(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Halcyon"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/halcyon1920unse 




n 
m. 

VNCCQAnEMlaiRE. 

re. 

Ie5 3po^fs . 



AA-a^^,. 



Foreword 



If in offering this HALCYON to 
Swarthmoreans we, of tlie Class of 
Nineteen Twenty, may revive long 
cherished memories for those who 
have left their Alma Mater, perpet- 
uate a love for Swarthmore in those 
whose college years are not yet four, 
and reflect for those who knew it 
not the true nature and achieve- 
ments of the military order which 
has so soon come and gone, then 
our earnest desire and purpose will 
have been accomplished. "^ "^ 



IN RECOGNITION OF THE 
CONSTANCY OF PURPOSE 
AND UNTIRING EFFORT 
EXERCISED INTHE INTER- 
EST OF THAT ORDER WHICH 
RENDERED SWARTHMORE 
COLLEGE COMPETENT TO 
MEET A NATIONAL EMER- 
GENCY, THE JUNIOR CLASS 
GRATEFULLY DEDICATES 
TO D FAN 

William Albert Alexander 

THIS HALCYON 
OF NINETEEN TWENTY 



n^lcyofi Staff 

















'-?>y 










Swartbmorc at tl)e j^lattsburg Oraiiting (Tamp 




Swartbmore's ^aval TA-vlators at 511.11. O. 



10 




]1 



THE FACULTY 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Spencer Trotter, M.D. Professor of Biology 

Samuel C. Palmer, Ph.D. - - - - Assistant Professor of Biology 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Gellert Alleman, B.S., Ph.D. - - - Professor of Chen^istry 

H. Jermain M. Creighton, B.A., M.A., M.Sc, D.Sc, Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry 

J. Russell Hull, A.B. - - - - - - Instructor in Chemistry 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND LAW 



Thomas Klingenberg Urdahl, Ph.D. 
Louis N. Robinson, A.B., Ph.D. - 



Professor of Economics 
Professor of Economics 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

George Frederick Blessing, B.M.E., M.E., Ph.D.. /. V. Williamson Professor 

of Mechanical Engineering 
Lewis Fussell, B.S., M.S., E.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
Charles G. Thatcher, A.B. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

John Joseph Matthews, A.B. . - - - Instructor in Engineering 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Harold Clarke Goddard, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Alexander CrisrvoU Cummins Pro- 
fessor of English 
Maude Bassett Gorham, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. - - Instructor in English 
Edgar White BurRILL, A.M. - - - Assistant Professor of English 

Esther Elizabeth Baldwin, A.M. - - - - Instructor in English 
Grace Winter Greene, A.M. - . - - Instructor in English 




14 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS AND FINE ARTS 

Henrietta Josephine Meeteer, Ph.D. - Professor of Greek and Latin 

Ethel Hampson Brewster, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Creek and Latin 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

^William Isaac Hull, Ph.D., Isaac H. Clothier Professor of History and Interna- 
tional Relations 
Edwin T. Kelley, A.B., A.M., B.S., Professor of History and International Relations 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY 

John Anthony Miller, Ph.D., Edward H. Magill Professor of Mathematics and 

Astronomy 
John Himes Pitman, A.M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
Earle Brenneman Miller, A.M., Acting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Caroline H. Smedley, A.M., - Assistant in Astronomy and Mathematics 

Walter Antonio Matos, A.B. Volunteer Observer in the Sproul Observatory 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND SPANISH 



Isabelle Bronk, Ph.B., Ph.D., Susan W. Lippincott Professor of the French Lan- 
guage and Literature, and Secretary of the Faculty 
Lander MacClintock, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Marcelle Achard 

Genevieve Tarby 

Mercedes C. Iribas ------ 



Instructor in French 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in French 

Assistant in Spanish 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Clara Price Newport, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of German Language and Literature 
Edna Harriet Richards, A.M. - Instructor in German. and Dean of Women 



*/\b.sent nil leave during second semester. 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Robert C. Brooks, Ph.D. - Joseph Wharton Professor of Political Science 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

Jesse Herman Holmes, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of History of Religion and Philosophy 
Charles Henry Fisher, A.M., - - - Acting Professor of Education 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING 

*Paul Martin Pearson, Litt.D. - - Professor of Public Speaking 

Wilbur Jones Kay . . - - Acting Professor of Public Speaking 

Elizabeth Biggins Oliver, A.M., Instructor in Public Speaking (Acting Head of 
the Department) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Mason E. Hufford, Ph.D. - - - Acting Assistant Professor of Physics 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 
E. LeRoy Mercer, M.D. . - - - Director of Physical Education 

DEPARTMENT OF WOMEN'S PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Helen Collins Culin, A.B., Acting Director of Physical Education of the Women 
Mary R. Lewis, M.D. ------ Lecturer in Hygiene 

Florence Marguerite Rose - Assistant in Physical Education of the Women 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Elizabeth Powell Bond, A.M. ----- Dean Emeritus 

William Hyde Appleton, Ph.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of the Creek Lan- 
guage and Literature 
Susan J. Cunningham, Sc.D., Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 
George Arthur Hoadley, C.E., A.B., A.M., Sc.D., Emeritus Professor of Physics 



^Absent on leave. 



16 




^dministratiori 



Joseph Swain, LL.D. (Wabash), LL.D. (Lafayette), 

LL.D. (Pennsylvania), $ B K, President of the College 

John Anthony Miller, Ph.D. (Chicago), 2 H, * B K, 

Vice President of the College 
Edna Harriet Richards, A.M., n B * 

Acting Dean of Women 
William Albert Alexander, A.B., <l> r A - Dean 
John Russell Hayes, AB., LL.B., * b k Librarian 
Harriet E. Worrell, A.B., Secretary to the President 
Chester Roberts, A.B. - - Superintendent 
Ella MichenER - Assistant to the Dean of Women 

Ruth Stephenson, A.B., K k r - - - - Secretary to the Dean 

Margaret Ormond, B.S. ---... Assistant Librarian 

Anne C. Brierly ---.----.. Dietitian 

Sarah Doddrell Coale - - . . . Matron of Wharton Hall 

Caroline Augusta Lukens, B.L. - - Matron of Parrish Hall Center 

Mary E. Cook ---...... Director of the Laundry 

Elizabeth Redheffer Hirst ----._ Bookkeeper 

Florence B. Barrett -------.. Nurse 

Julia R. Young, A.B. - - - - - Stenographer to the Dean 



PRESIDENT SW.ilN' 





I)i;.\.\ AI.EX,\.\liE]t 



DEAN UICHARDS 



17 



^oar6 of Managers 



President 
Vice Presidenl 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



- Robert M. Janney 

Wilson M. Powell, Jr. 

Hetty Lippincott Miller 

Charles M. Biddle 



Term Expires Twelfth Month, 1919 

Edward Martin, M.D. ---.... Philadelphia 

Robert M. Janney - - - - - - - - Philadelphia 

Wilson M. Powell, Jr. ------ - New York City 

William W. Cocks ----- Westbury, Long Island, N. Y. 

Lucy Biddle Lewis -------- Lansdowne 

Philip M. Sharpless - - - - - - - - West Chester 

Mary Hibbard Thatcher ------- Swarthmore 

Mary Wharton Mendelson New York City 



Term Expires Twelfth Month, 1920 

Howard W. Lippincott 

Emma C. Bancroft ------ 

Charles F. Jenkins 

Harriet Cox McDowell 

Abigail Foulke Pim - 

Robert H. Walker 

T. Stockton Matthews 

Mary Lippincott Griscom 

Term Expires Twelfth Month, 1921 

Joanna Wharton Lippincott - . - -, 
Howard Cooper Johnson . - . - . 

Rowland Comly - 

Hetty Lippincott Miller ----- 
Elsie Palmer Brown .-.--. 

Henry C. Turner - 

Daniel Underhill, Jr. 

Esther H. Cornell .--..- 



Swarthmore 

Wilmington, Del. 

Philadelphia 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Swarthmore 

Baltimore, Md. 

- Baltimore, Md. 

Moorestown, N. J. 



Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 

Riverton, N. J. 

Washington, D. C. 

New York City 

Brooklyn, N, Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Term Expires Twelfth Month, 1922 

Isaac H. Clothier -------- Philadelphia 

Emma McIlxaine Cooper ------ Camden, N. J. 

Rebecca C. Longstreth ------- Haverford 

William C. Sproul - - - - - - - - - Chester 

Caroline H. Worth Coatesville 

Robert Pyle --------- West Grove 

Joseph Swain -..------ Swarthmore 

Edward B. Temple Swarthmore 



18 




La vie Militaire 



it is icit/i a feeling of real pride tlutt I eon- 
template the record /iiade by Sifartliiiiore 
men in the struggle of the ages. The 
affectio)! in zchieh our loyal ahiinni held 
their Alma 3Iater has been strengthened 
by the knoidedge that Sivarthniore has 
contributed so much to the service of the 
Republic in its great crisis. We are grate- 
ful that our Sicarthmore vien of the fight- 
ing age have been so courageous and so 
dependable and that the men and icomen 
oj the older classes, who did not fight. 
rcdlied so splendidly to patriotic duty here 
at home. May -we have the further joy of 
seeing Swarthmore in all its elements stand 
firmly for American principles at home and 
abroad in the days of readjustment zchieh 
are before us. 

Williaiit C. Sprout, '91, 

Governor of Pen iisytraii in. 



19 




21 



HALCYON 




^. 




r 

7 




I 

Z 
D 





22 



A-^A- 



THE S. A. T. G. 



I 

z 

D 



A RAISON D'ETRE 

^4^^^^ HOUGH to turn aside from the course dictated by the convictions of con- 
M ^ I science be to jeopardize the stronghold in which those beHefs have been cher- 
^^^ ^y ished, yet the unselfishness, the freedom from bias or narrow sectarianism 
which such action reveals, recommend those who commit themselves to the 
change as wholly commendable and praiseworthy before the world, — m truth more to be 
respected than those v\'ho, unswerving, resist every departure from the exercise of their 
time-honored doctrines. 

Swarthmore College came to feel that the exigency of the military situation in which 
the United States was involved called upon her for an emergency measure. It was no 
longer time for the ordinary pursuit of a peace program. The time was ripe for sacrifice, 
for departure from principle, even, in order better to serve. Such was her state of mind 
when approached by the Government with a proposal to establish a unit of the Students 
Army Training Corps at Swarthmore. And in such a state of mind, supported by a con- 
cert of alumni and undergraduate opinion, the College opened her doors to Uncle Sam and 
set about assisting the military representatives in the establishment of the new order. 

Now that the emergency is past, we are competent to look back upon the military 
regime with an unclouded vision, and estimate the extent of its success. The life of a sol- 
dier — on this side of the firing line, at least — is everywhere hailed as a healthy and robust 
existence, affording excellent opportunity for physical betterment. So it was found at 
Swarthmore. The prescribed exercise, the regular hours of eating and sleeping, and the 
disciphnary training of the army, livened many a step, broadened many a pair of shoul- 
ders, and made many a sluggard a true, trim soldier. 

But apart from the value of the S. A. T. C. to the men in its ranks, the organization 
made a considerable contribution toward the potential fighting power of the country. None 
of the members of the Swarthmore unit were sent overseas ; only a few were ordered to 
officers training camps; but many, at the time orders for demobiliziation came through, had 
been recommended for such transfer. In a short time, probably by the end of January, 
the original membership of the Swarthmore unit would have been exhausted by departure 
of the candidate-officers to training camps of the various branches of the service. In this 
respect, then, the S. A. T. C. at Swarthmore made an essential contribution to the War 
Department's officers training program. 

The remaining consideration has to do with the material effect of the S. A. T. C. 
upon the College. Many institutions which supported units of the S. A. T. C. suffered 



1_ 



I 

Z 
D 



HALCYON 



first, from being obliged to lower their standards of scholarship and character, and sec- 
ond, from sudden discontinuance of income upon demobilization. President Swain has 
drawn our attention to the absence of the former condition at Swarthmore; and these ele- 
ments being interdependent, the latter detriment was evidently negligible. Finally, as for 
those persons who decried the establishment of the military unit at Swarthmore, let us refer 
to our opening words, with this much in addition, — that while the Stars and Stripes, float- 
ing over Parrish Hall during that period of three months, designated Swarthmore College 
as a military post, those colors still may wave emblematic of the service rendered, while 
beneath that flag there exists a College mind no less loyal to traditional origin, and cer- 
tainly invigorated and refreshed by this serviceable deviation from patriarchal precedent. 



I 

z 

D 



Z 
D 




24 



^-A--^ 



I 

z 



The Halcyon Photoplay 
Company 



in rii\st Fresentation of 

"Bb<t5.:3V.O.(L.a5lt:aea-lr>Jl>as" 



Genesis : 
In the 
beginning. 
Uncle Sam 
created the 

S. A. T. C, 






£« 







ancJ some neutral 
non-combatants. 



out of men 
from all parts 
of the country, 



even including 
a few gobs 




I 

z 

D 



25 



^-A--^ 



HALCYON 



He put the kybosh 
on the erst-while 
class scraps 




4f^«~««to 




I 

z 



r 
z 

D 



and substituted in 
their places such 
as this. 





who spoiled 

our sleep 

in the morning. 



Th 



en along came 




26 



^-A-^^ 



THE S. A. T. C. 



On the first of October, we 
took a pace forward, greatly 
altering our lives. 



Before long the Boches 
let out some Flu germs 
and for ages we lived in 
Quarantine, with nothing 
to do but — 






S 


1 fL:-^ 


JHPH||.siE^ 




■^"tlT' ^ jHHUIk 


yi w « 


K: ' , ^j ftvniBMP 


^^Zm ■ 


Utf-- * • -"^ 


>*"■ 


p« 



I 

i 




I 

7 

a 



Then the day students 
came back and organized 
the Flu Gang in the gym. 



When that was 
over and we had 
pledged all of our 
pay for the next 
decade for 



|_«M| ■^H 



THINK! 

//ay^eyouJboug/it 
Your L/m/t — 



th LIBERTY 

- LOAN 



They hiked us 



^ ^ ,^ ^ 



27 



^-A-^ 



HALCYON 



I 

z 



11 



to Chester 







while the girls 
waited for us to 
"come back from 
Over There." 





t 


mmmm 





At P. M. C. we 



I 

z 

D 



Even the dog 
drilled 







28 



^l ^ 



^-^^ 




I 
I 



and sometimes 
Foxy Grandpa gave 
us the once-over. 




When we got back 
there was always a raid 
on Bogardus' canteen 



\ 


.^^ 


C' 


*=> 




^^TT^"^^ 


, Jval 


|pL:fe ;^ IE 


^fflft^ 




Eu'IffiipM 


ft? BU^ fl HiJflbi. j' 1, 


fe-' 


•^■^ 



after devouring 
which we 
gambled like 
real soldiers. 




We spent most of 
our time on K. P. 
Guard, or P. G. 




Then the monkey 
suits came 




and after much squads 
right, squads left, and 
on right into line 



■>«'"'■ ■"" •"vr: 



29 



^-A- 



HALCYON 



z 




i|p# gi:i^i^mr% 




we began to look 
like regulars 



Whereupon we bet 
on our team and 
went in to Franklin 
Field to collect the 
coin. 



But we missed our 
guess, and bemg 
disgusted 




■ ^WJ il ^W* 








. ! ,:r.w. . 



I 

z 



30 



^-A--^ 



THE S. A. T. C. 



I 

z 



decided to beat up 
P. M. C. on their field 



Twmmm. Tw 




and then to quit 
the army. "The Loot' 
was wilHng. He gave 
us our walking papers 
down in Headquarters 



and except for 
cur wounded men 




we threw up the game and 
went home for the holidays 
displaymg our insignia 
Stick Around Till Christmas. 




I 

z 



r" 



£2jl, 



.•il 



^-A--A 



'20 AT WAR 



3- 



"^itl) 1920 In tl)e Service 



Frank Edward Atkins 
Charles Biddle Atlee 



Naval Aviation. See Junior Section 
Aviation Training School, University of Columbia 



I 

z 






Robert Frost Carr 

Sergeant, Ordnance, Overseas 

Upon urgent request. Bob allowed it to 
be said of him that he was in the St. Mihiel 
drive and the drive through the Argonne 
Forest, handling ammunition. He tells 
more freely of a Christmas banquet at which 
his Jazz band amused a gang of German 
prisoners. "The piano we got from one of 
the German barracks. The other pieces 
were the bottom of a chair, a fifty-gallon 
soup kettle, a three-foot circular saw, a piece 
of iron, a big dinner bell, and three combs 
with tissue paper." 



Alfred James Chalmers - Engineers, Overseas 

"Al" wanted to do his bit in the Aviation, but the 
promise of a long wait on this side in that branch of 
the service didn't suit him, so he got in the Engineers 
instead. He soon found himself in France doing "in- 
teresting, valuable and important work with a camou- 
flage outfit," which consisted of hiding Yank artillery 
from Boche fire. 




I 

z 



33 



John Francis Cunningham - . . Twelfth Field Artilery, U. S. A. 

Jack tried hard to get into the service. When he finally hooked up with the Field 
Artillery, in training at Camp Merritt, he was beset with hard luck. Measles got 
him just as his Battery was preparing to cross the pond and he was invalided and dis- 
charged. He IS now at Princeton University. 



James Raymond Dalton 



Thomas Leggett Eagan 



Corporal, Engineers, Overseas 



Lieutenant, Infantry. See Junior Section 



D.AMD Braman Fell ----- Corporal, U. S. Marine Corps 

Dave was one of the men who joined the Marines to get "action." Instead, he 
got inaction, much to his disgust. He writes, "College men in this outfit do not carry 
out Miss Gorham's 'noblesse oblige' doctrine in regard to assuming the burden of 
leadership. Ally Cornog has accepted a dog-rubber's' job, and Dave Harry is 
studying Russian. As for me, can you picture me a corporal of the guard posting 
a relief, wearing a 'gat' on my right hip, 'chasing' a detail of long-haired, unshaven 
prisoners clad in dungarees around to their chow, and answering a hundred and one 
fool questions in that mad house of a guard room." 



I 

z 



r 



John Robert Fetter 
Recognize Bob? 



U. S. Navy 




^-A 



'20 AT WAR 



Clifford Riggs Gillam 
Arthur Tyson Groome 



Naval Aviation. See Junior Section 
Corporal, Infantry, Overseas 




Ervin Lincoln Hall 

2nd Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

''I would not have missed the experience 
I received as a private and officer in the 
Field Artillery for anything I know of. 
Coming in contact with men from all parts 
of the country is an education which can- 
not be obtained from books. * * * My idea, 
which I believe is shared by every F. A. 
man is that it is the greatest branch of the 
service, for proof of which, ask Andy 
Simpson what he thinks." 



□ 



'— Ralf Lee Hartwell 



d 



Base Hospital 34, Overseas 

Ralf had not been two months out of the hospital 
with a severe attack of pneumonia before he enlisted 
in the Ambulance Corps, May, 1917. He went 
across with his unit in December, and stuck to the 
game many months after it was all over. He expects 
to return to College in the fall. 




^ ^ 



n 



35 



^-A--A 



HALCYON 



James Minshall Holden 



Lieutenant, Infantry. See Junior Section 




William Yates Irwin, Jr. 

Sergeant, Chemical Warfare Service 

"The hard-boiled guy said gas was "Bunk." 
Said it was harmless, only stunk; 
And that the cock-eyed world he'd tell 
That all gas masks could go to — well, 
They sent hard-boiled up to the line; 
Fritz spilled the mustard good and fine ; 
And yet some folks still wonder why 
'Twas flowers for the hard-boiled guy." 



7 

D 



I 

Z 

D 



Jesse Gearing Johnson - Ensign, U. S. N. 

"Stuge planned to murder me. Got me a ride in 
a seaplane. After about half an hour of flying, our 
motor stopped at an altitude of 2,000 feet. So we 
went down. When we hit the ocean, I went right on 
through my seat. We were about fifteen miles from 
shore. Monkeyed around with a Liberty Motor on 
the bum until picked up by a transport in answer to 
the rockets we were sending up. During the night, 
while we were being towed ashore, the plane sank to 
the bottom of the bay." 




David Streeper Klauder 



Lieutenant, Infantry. See Junior Section 



36 



^-^-^ 



'20 AT WAR 



T 

1 

Q 

i 

L 
n 



1920 ia tl)e OrencI) Mortar ^atter^ 



George Corwin Holmes 
Philip Witherspoon Hunt 
Carl Franklin Michael - 
Clinton Elmer Walter, Jr. 
Russell Atlee Yarnall - 



- Private 

First Lieutenant 

Corporal 

Sergeant 



"We started out with I 1 days of straight 
service down in Lorraine followed without 
rest by campaigns on the Champagne front, 
Soissons-Rheims salient, St. Mihiel salient, 
Argonne woods and in front of Verdun. 
The armistice was signed when we were 
within a few kilometers of Sedan." 





"The other night we were on our way back 
from our positions, and the Boche aviators 
were everywhere overhead, seeking anything 
to bomb. We were all in a big open wagon, 
and the men were dead tired and hungry. 
It was a beautiful moonlight night, and down 
from the skies, like a hawk swooping for its 
prey, came an avion of the black crosses, 
and let loose all four of his bombs on us, 
and then disappeared into the darkness." 



n 



LIKUT. C.MiL F. M1CII.\EL 




I 



Clinton Elmer Walter - - - - 1 1 7th Trench Mortar Battery 
"For days before the start of the battle we had been expecting it every night. * * '^ 
An hour before the scheduled time for the beginning of the enemy's artillery opera- 
tions, our own guns began pounding away with a steady thunder at Fritz's divisions. 
Suddenly there was a whine, a little different from those of our own shells, followed 
by a muffled report as a German gas shell landed a couple of hundred yards away. 
All was quiet for several minutes, and then suddenly hell broke loose." 

Philip Hunt 

We haven't been able to glean much from Phil directly about his service with the 
T. M. B., but we read a newspaper account some time ago of an interview with 
a wounded man of the 1 1 7th, who declared that "one of the bravest soldiers in the 
organization was a Phil Hunt, of Wayne. " 

James Horace Mendenhall ..-.-- Naval Aviation 
Horace had only been in the snappy uniform of an aviator a month when the 
armistice was signed, and his chances for high flying went up the spout. 

William Henry Norris -------- Infantry 

Bill and A. Mitchell Palmer were both doing essential War Work at Washing- 
ton. They bunked together, only Bill was no Custodian. He was in the Adjutant 
General's Office, holding down a job "that is worse than boning for the final exams." 

Chester Willets Vanderbilt - - - - Ensign, U. S. Navy 

"Come on down. I'd like to show you over a ship, for you can't begin to realize 
how darn little I know about the Navy." 

Lloyd Agnew Vorhees - - - - - - U. S. Marine Corps 

Lloyd tried harder than the Boches to get to Paris, but he only got to Paris Island 
with the Marines. 



Base Hospital 20, Overseas 
ittle respite from the trials and toils of 



Earle Rash Wheatley 

We hear that ''Wheat" once sought a 
Ambulance work and took a trip through La Belle France, stopping for some time 
at Monte Carlo We marvel that he ever got away, considering that middle name 
of his. 



Clarence Howard Yoder 



2nd Lieutenant. Infantry 



See Junior Section 



T 



n 







^-A-^ 



I 

z 

D 



5wartl)more '^av ^ecor6 

In compiling a war record of this character, there must of necessity be many inac- 
curacies and many cases of incomplete information. Every effort has been made, how- 
ever, to secure an account of the name and service of every Swarthmorean, and the fol- 
lowing is as complete a record as may be presented, considering the scarcity of available 
information and of space in which to present it. 

A count of the number of Swarthmoreans in actual military service shows a total of 
five hundred and sixteen. Subtracting one hundred and sixty-two men who were in the 
Students' Army Training Corps, either at Swarthmore or other institutions, there remain 
more than three hundred and .fifty who saw service outside of college halls. It is safe to 
say that this number represents more than fifty per cent, of the total number of Swarth- 
moreans of military age. This count gives no consideration to the large number of Swarth- 
more men and women who served in various branches of non-military war work. These 
figures tell better than words the story of Swarthmore's patriotism and unselfish sacrifice. 

The follo\ving list will give an idea of the diversity of service rendered by Swarth- 
moreans, and of their preferences for different branches of the service. 



Students Army Training Corps 
Infantry . . . . 

Ordnance Department 
Navy and Naval Reserve Force - 
Field, Heavy and Coast Artillery 
Engineers . - - - 

Army Air Service 
Naval Aviation . - - 

Medical Corps - - . 

Ambulance Corps - - . 

Marine Corps . - - 

Signal Corps - . - . 

Quartermasters Department 
Courier Service - - r 

Tank Corps ... 

Chemical Warfare Service 
Motor Transport Service 
Cavalry . . _ . 



162 

69 

46 

45 

36 

30 

25 

22 

18 

12 

12 

11 

8 

8 

7 

4 

3 



One hundred and thirty-three Swarthmoreans were overseas in active military serv- 
ice. Ten Swarthmore men and one professor met death while in their country's service. 
Four of these casualties were from the class of '19, the class which actually contributed 
the greatest number of men to the service, and which suffered the most from the war. The 



D 



HALCYON 



''"' W^^?'^'^' '-* 




I 

Z 




'JLJ- i I 




^ 



If 




I 

z 



40 



^-A-^ 



WAR RECORD 



following statistics show that fifty-seven ' 1 9ers were in the service. While this number 
is not as great as that shown by '21 and '22, it must be remembered that most of the 
men of the latter classes were in the S. A. T. C. 



n 



~7 



Class 

'22 
'21 
•20 
'19 
'18 
'17 
'16 
'15 
•14 
'13 
'12 
•11 
'10 
'09 



Number of Men in Service 



Class 



76 


'08 


69 


•07 


50 


•06 


57 


'05 


39 


'03 


45 


'02 


37 


•01 


28 


•00 


16 


'98 


20 


'95 


15 


'87 


12 


•80 


5 


'78 


13 





Number o£ Men in Service 

3 

- 7 
6 

- 4 
2 

- 2 
1 

- 2 
2 

- 3 
2 
1 
2 



A very large proportion of the total number of Swarthmoreans who went into the 
service won commissions. In her quota of officers, Swarthmcre boasts of one colonel, one 
heutenant-colonel, twelve majors, twenty-seven captams, fifteen ensigns, and one hundred 
and fifteen lieutenants. While less is known about the number of Swarthmoreans who 
were non-commissioned officers, it is certain that there were two sergeant-majors, two 
master engineers, twenty-six sergeants, and fifteen corporals. 



Abele, Richard P., ex-' 11 
Agnew, Harmon P., ex-' 19 
AiNswoRTH, Cyril, ex-' 17 
AiNswoRTH, Eric, '21 
AINSWORTH, HAROLD, ' 

Killed December 19, 1917 
Ainsworth, Marcus, ex-' 19 
Albertson, a. Raymond, ex- 
Albertson, Edwin R., ex-' 19 
Albertson, John G., '20 
Alderfer, Clement J., '17 
Alford, Newell G., '09 
Ames, James W., '17 - 
Anthony, J. Garner, '22 
ARNOLD, JAMES P., ex-' 19, 

1918 



17, 



- Captain, Q. M. C. 

- Captam, Infantry 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation, A. E. F. 

- C. Q. M., U. S. Naval Aviation 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation, A. E. F. 



Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

16 Infantry, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Cadet, U. S. Army Aviation 

Sergeant, Engineers 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

Sergeant, Field Artillery 

Captain, Infantry, A. E. F. Killed in action June, 



I 

z 



^ ^ ^ ^ 



41 



I 

z 



•22 

17 - 
'14 
'19 



'21 

'22 



Atkins, F. Edward, '20 
Atkinson, T. Howard, '20 
Bailey, Lynn H., '17 
Baker, Albert B., ex-' 13 - 
Baker, H. Fenimore, ex-' 19 
Baldwin, Bird T., '00 
Ballard, Judson T., '19 
Barker, John B., ex- 
Barnard, Boyd T., '1 
Barnard, Elliot M., 
Barnard, Norris C. 
Bartleson, Edward E., 
Battersby, William L. 
Baum, Richard T., ex-'09 
Baxter, Albert L., '22 
Baxter, Harold C, ex-' 16 
Bell, John W., '17 
Benjamin, Grant E., '21 - 
Berg, Mann G., ex-'21 - 
Berry, Homer H., ex-' 19 - 
Berry, Paul, ex-' 18 
Beury, William M., '15 - 
Bew, Walter T., ex-' 17 
BiTLER, Henry H., Jr., '20 
Blackburn, Albert E., ex-'95 
Blackburn, Russell, '16 - 
Blackman, Albert E., ex-'95 
Blackwell, Charles M., ex-' 1 6 
Blair, Francis C, '22 - 
Blake, Gilson, '15 
Blake, J. Murdock, ex-' 19 
Blake, Walter S., ex-' 17 - 
Blau, Robert S., '18 
BoNSALL, Thomas F., '22 - 
BouREAU, Harry N., ex-'21 
Bower, Chester B., ex-'06 
Boyd, Fisher L., ex-'08 - 
Bradfield, W. H. Gibson, '14 
Bressler, Alexander L., '21 
Bressler, Harper V., '14 - 



C. Q. M., U. S. Naval Aviation 

S. A. r. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant, Engineers, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Ordnance 

Lieutenant, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

- Major, Sanitary Corps 
S. A. T. C , Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Sergeant, Ordnance 
Sergeant, Heavy Artillery, A. E. F. 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, Italian Army, Italian War Cross 
S. A. T. C., S\s'arthmore College 

Engineers 

- Lieutenant, Q, M. C, A. E. F. 

Seaman, First Class, U. S. Navy 

Tank Corps, A. E. F. 

U. S. Navy 

Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

- Sergeant, Signal Corps 
Lieutenant, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Surgeon, Examining Board 

Ordnance 

Contract Surgeon, Medical Department 

Ordnance. A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Ensign, U. S. Navy 

- Lieutenant, Infantry 
Sergeant, U. S. Marine Corps 

- Ensign, U. S. Navy 
- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

S. A. T. C, Brown University 

Lieutenant, Ordnance 

- Captain, Ordnance 

Field Artillery 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, U. S. Navy 



z 

D 



4a 



^^A--^ 



WAR RECORD 



I 

z 

D 



BRIGGS, HARRY S., ex-' 16 
Briggs, Leon W., '17 
Brinton, S. Jervis, ex-' 16 
Bronk, Detlev W., '20 
Brooke, Richard D., ex-' 17 - 
Brown, Boyd J., '21 - 
Brown, Herbert L., '16 
Brown, John T., ex-' 19 
Browning, Robert S., '15 
BucKMAN, Howard M., '14 
BucKMAN, Franklin P., ex-' 19 
Bunting, George M., ex-' 19 
Bunting, Stephen C, '20 
Burn, Philip H., ex-'21 
Burnett, George L., '21 
Bush, Edwin M., '20 
Butterworth, Harold L., '22 
Cameron, Warren M., ex-' 18 
Campbell, Edward L., ex-'22 
Campbell, Richard D., ex-'22 
Carpenter, Philip E., '13 
Carr, Robert F., ex-'20 
Carris, Edward C, '19 - 
Carrol, Wharton B., '14 
Carter, James F., '22 - 
Carter, William P., '21 - 
Casey, George W., '21 - 
Cavin, Edward H., '09 
Chalmers, Alfred J., ex-'20 - 
Chandler, Paul W., '21 - 
Christensen, Alfred, '21 
Cisney, William R., '22 - 
Clark, Allen G., '22 - 
Clark, Norman W., ex-' 16 
Clement, John F., '08 
Clime, Benjamin S., '16 - 
Coles, Charles B., '21 
Collins, Leon H., '21 
Collisson, Norman H., '22 - 
Colt, Howard F., '12 



U. S. Air Service, A. E. F., Died in Prance 

- Corporal, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 
Sergeant, Field Artillery, Medical Reserve Corps 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 
U. S. Army A^mbulance Corps, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- U. S. Navy 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 

U. S. Navy 

Base Hospital Unit No. 20, A. E. F. 

- First Class Ship-Fitter, U. S. Navy 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C , Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Ordnance 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 
Sergeant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Medical Department, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

O. T. C. 
Engineers, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

Ordinance, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Ordinance, A, E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant, Engineers, A. E. F. 



I 



43 



r 



7 
D 



HALCYON 




I 

z 





44 



^-A--A 



WAR RECORD 



I 

z 

D 



CoMLEY, Roy C, '17 
CoNAHEY, George, '20 
Conway, J. Frederick, ex-'2I 
CooGAN, John S., ex-' 15 
CoRNOG, Allison, G., "19 

CORNOG, ElLWOOD C, ex-' 1 7 

CoRNOG, I. Clyde, '17 - 
Corson, Ewing T., '18 
CoRsoN, George C, '10 
Craig, George A., ex-' 16 - 
Crew, Roland H., '13 - 
Crewitt, John A., ex-' 10 - 
Crews, Robert A., '11 - 
Cunningham, John F., ex-'20 
Curran, Thomas A., ex-'22 
Curtin, Ellsworth F., '16 
Daller, George M., '11 
Dalton, Raymond J., ex-'20 
Darlington, Isaac G., '07 
Darlington, Richard A., '21 
Dassell, Virgil H., ex-'22 
Davenport, LaMar H , '22 
Delaplaine, Roy W., '13 
Dennis, Fred C, '16 
Dennison, David M., '21 
Denworth, Raymond K., '11 
Detwiler, Daniel, ex-'22 
Diggins, George J., '22 
Dillingham, William H., '16 
Donnelly, Frederick S., '18 
Dowdell, Marc P., ex-' 17 
Dov/DY, Allen E., '16 
Downing, W. Kirk, '22 
DoYLE, John, '21 - - - 
Doyle, Thomas H., '16 
Dudley, Frank S., '22 
Dudley, John W., '21 - 
Dufendach, Harold E., '22 
Duffy, C. Clyde, ex-' 19 
Dunn, Henry W., ex-' 16 - 
Durbin, William H., ex-'21 
D'Olier, Francis W., '07 - 



Lieutenant, Chemical Warfare Service, A. E. I-. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant Major, Infantry 
Sergeant, Engineers, A. E. F. 

- U. S. Marine Corps 
Lieutenant, Infantry 

U. S. Army Air Service 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 

Lieutenant, Motor Transport Corps, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

Master Engineer, Engineers, A. E. F. 

- U. S. Ambulance Corps, A. E. F. 

- Lieutenant, Infantry 

Field Artillery 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Engineers, A. E. F. 

- - - - Lieutenant, Ordnance 

S. A. 1 . C, Swarthmore College 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Captain, Infantry, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Major, Ordnance 

Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
U. S. Marine Corps, Lieutenant, Army Aviation 

- Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 

Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

Cadet, U. S. Coast Guard 

S. A. T. C Swarthmore College 

- Chief Machinist's Mate, U. S. Naval Aviation 

- Lieutenant, Infantry 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Gunnery Sergeant, U. S. Marine Corps 

- Camp Quartermaster, Utilities Dept., Q. M. C. 

- Base Hospital Unit No. 20, A. E. F. 
Captain, Ordnance 



I 

z 

u 



45- 



r 



Eagan, Thomas L., '20 - 
Earp, John E., '22 - 
Eby, Leslie H., '16 
Elliot, Mark, ex-' 19 
Elsbree, Wayland H., '21 
Elsbree, Willard, S., '22 
End, George K., ex-' 17 
Esibill, Norman F., '22 
EssLiNGER, George P., '22 
Evans, C. Earl, ex-' 1 6 
Evans, Henry T., ex-' 19 
EwELL, Frank O., '18 
FAIRLAMB, H. GARDINER 

January 12, 1918 

Farley, Robert, ex-'09 
Farley, Walter S., ex-' 15 
Fell, David B., ex-'20 
Ferguson, Donald R., '12 
Ferris, John P., ex-' 19 
Fetter, Frank W., '20 
Fetter, J. Robert, ex-'20 - 
Ford, Carroll P., '21 - 
Francis, A. Tench, '20 
FussELL, Milton H., '15 
Gaito, William P., ex-'22 
Gardiner, Arthur W., '20 
Garwood, Justice P., ex-' 14 
Gaskill, Joseph F., '10 
Gatchell, Warren E., '14 
Gawthrop, Harold J., ex-' 16, 

Force. 
Gemmill, Paul F., '17 
Gilchrist, Claude F., '12 
GiLKYsoN, T. Walter, '01 
GiLLAM, Clifford R., '20 
GiLLAM, W. Harry, '13 
Gillespie, Edward A., '22 
Gillespie, Franklin S., '19 
GiLMORE, J. Campbell, '1 1 
GiRDWooD, E. Nelson, '20 
GoEHRiNG, F. Rudolph, ex-'l 
GoEHRiNG, Walter, ex-' 18 



- Lieutenant, Infantry 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant, Ordnance 

U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Sergeant, Field Artillery 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, U. S. Army Ambulance Corps, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Medical Department, Aviation 

Engineers, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Engineers 

, ex-' 1 7, Corporal, Engmeers, Died on way to France, 

- - - Lieutenant, Medical Corps 

- Corporal, U. S. Marine Corps 

Corporal, U. S. Marine Corps 

- Captain, Machine Gun Battalion, A. E. F. 

Sergeant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Submarine Listener, U. S. Navy 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Tank Corps 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

Captain, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

Captain, Ordnance 

Machinist's Mate, Second Class, U. S. Naval Reserve 

Chemical Warfare Service 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation 

Captain, Ordnance; Major, Courier Service, A. E. F. 

Cadet, Naval Aviation 

- Captain, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation 

------ Lieutenant, Infantry 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
3 - - - - - Lieutenant, Infantry 

First Class Yeoman, U. S. Navy 



I 

z 

D 



46 



^-A- 



WAR RECORD 




I 



D 



GouRLEY, Russell C, '19 
GowDY, Edwin T., '19 
Graham, Malcolm S., '16 
Green, W. Russell, '13 - 
Griest, Maurice, '09 
Grigg, Eayre B., ex-' 1 8 
Grobert, Norman B., '2 1 
Gutelius, Frederick P., '17 
Hackman, Robert W., '12 
Haines, Howard L., e.\-'22 
Haldeman, Charles W., '20 
Halsey, William, '12 
Halsted, Jess, '18 
Hampson, Ormsby D., '22 - 
Hannum, Charles B., '22 
Harcourt, Ralph E., ex-' 11 
Harlan, Randolph B., '16 
Harry, David P., '16 
Hartung, Francis C, ex-' 17 
Hartv/ell, Ralf L., ex-'20 
Hastings, Lanta C, ex-'2 1 
Hayes, George P., '18 
Heacock, Ralph H., '18 
Headings, Donald M., '20 
Heald, Pusey B., '18 - 
Heck, J. Holland, ex-' 19 - 
Heed, Samuel D., '07 - 
Henderson, Leon, ex-' 18 - 
Henry, Russell A., ex-' 11 
Hess, Paul M., '20 - 
Hicks, Philip M., '05 - 
HiGGiNs, Robert B., ex-'80 
Hilgert, John M., '21 
Hilton, J. Stanley, ex-' 1 6 
Himes, William D., ex-'08 
HiRD, James P., ex-' 16 
Hodge, D. Malcolm, '19 
Hodge, Richard G., ex-' 19 
Hodge, Sewell W., '16 
Hoke, Cushman J., '19 
Hoke, Frank, '22 - 

HOLDEN, J. MiNSHALL, '20 



s. 


A. 


T. 


C. 


s. 


A. 


T. 


C. 


s. 


A. 


T. 


C. 


s. 


A. 


T. 


C. 



Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 

Plattsburg Training Camp 

Chief Gunner's Mate, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Artillery, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Engineers 

Corporal, Army Supply Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 

Lieutenant, Engineers 
Swarthmore College 
Swarthmore College 
Signal Corps 
Sergeant, Ordnance 
Swarthmore College 
Swarthmore College 
- C. P. O., U. S. Naval Aviation, France 
Sergeant, Signal Corps 
U. S. Marine Corps 

- - - S. A. T. C. 

- Base Hospital No. 34, A. E. F. 
Lieutenant, Tank Corps, A. E. F. 

Ambulance Corps 
- Ensign, U. S. Navy 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 

- - - Lieutenant, Infantry 
- - - - Captam, Ordnance 

Lieutenant, Ordnance 
U. S. Navy 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 

Captain, U. S. Navy 
- , - S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- - , - Naval Coast Reserves 

- - - Captain, Ordnance 
Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F., Italy 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps 

Lieutenant, Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. 

- U. S. Naval Reserve Force 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Infantry 



I 

z 



47 



r 
z 

D 



HOLLINGSHEAD, E. RoGER, ex-' 1 9 
HOLLINGSHEAD, S. B., ex-'98 

Holmes, George C, ex-'20 
Holmes, Jesse H., Jr., '21 
Holme, Harry D., '06 - 
Howell, Charles M., '19 
HoYT, Robert D., ex-'09 
HoYT, William K., '12 
HuEY, William R., '21 - 
Hunt, Philip W., ex-'20 - 
Hunter, Earl A., '15 - 
Hutchinson, Halbert C, ex-' 19 
Hutchinson, Herbert L., '22 
Irwin, William Y., Jr., ex-'20 - 
Jackson, Frank H., '22 
Jackson, George B., '21 - 
Jackson, Herbert W., ex-' 19 
Jackson, James J., '16 
Jackson, Otley E., ex-'OO 
James, Walter R., ex-'21 - - 
Jenkins, Dudley A., ex-' 17 - 
Jenkins, Howard M., '20 - 
Johnson, Jesse G., ex-'20 
Johnson, John W., ex-' 19 - 
Johnson, William P., '22 
Jones, Alden B., ex-' 13 
Jones, Alister R., ex-' 19 
Joseph, Edwin M., '21 
Joyce, Robert S., '21 - 
Katzenbach, Howard B., '21 
Keller, Joseph W., ex-'07 
Kelley, William D., ex-' 19 
Kelsey, Albert W., '22 
Kemp, William P., '21 
Kerns, W. Vernon, '13 
KiNKEAD, William H., ex-'22 
Klauder, David S., '20 
Kline, Benjamin, ex-'07 
Klopp, John W., '21 - 
KoLB, George H., '21 
Korn, Adolph, '17 
Lafore, J. A., '95 - 



Ordnance, A. E. F. 

Major, Medical Hospital Train, A. E. F. 

Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Engineers, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Captain, U. S. Army Aviation 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. 

- Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

Transportation Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant, Chemical Warfare Service, A. E. F. 

Corporal, Field Artillery 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Lieutenant, Engineers 

Captain, Engineers 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Base Hospital Umt 38, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Base Hospital Unit No. 20, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, University of Pennsylvania 

Lieutenant, Signal Corps 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Major, Field Artillery 

Lieutenant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Lieutenant, Infantry 

Medical Reserve Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Engineers 
- Major, Ordnance 



I 



48 




r 
z 

D 



Lambrecht, Herbert F., '22 
Landis, D. Allen, 
Landis, Harry H., '21 - 
Landon, Frederick N., '22 
Lang, Harry W., '21 - 
Lang, Walter B., '17 
Larkin, Charles P., '21 
Laubach, Robert W., ex-' 18 
Lesley, Conrad C, ex-' 17 
Lewis, Lloyd D., '13 
Linton, Ralph, '15 - - 
Lipfincott, James J., '05 - 
LiPPiNCOTT, Olin W., '22 
Lipfincott, Robert C, ex-' 17 - 
Lock, Roy L., ex-' 18 

LONGSTRETH, JOHN C, ex-'2 1 

LowDEN, Franklin, ex-' 16 
LowDEN, William P., '22 - 
Lucas, Edwin A., '14 
LucKiE, Edward B., ex-' 12 
LuKENS, Arthur T., ex-' 19 - 
LuKENS, Charles W., '21 
LuKENS, James C, '17 - - 
LuKENs, James W., ex-'21 - 
LuKENs, Samuel C, ex-' 18 
LuKENs, Walter L., '12 - 
LuKENS, William P., '13 
Lungren, C. Howard, ex-'21 
LuTZ, Maurice McN., '14 - 
McAllister, T. Sherman, '21 - 
McCabe, Thomas B., '15 
McClellan, George B., '22 
McConnell, Oviatt, ex-'22 - 
McCullough, Campbell R , '22 
McDoNOUGH, William R., '07 
McEvoy, Lawrence J., '22 
McGuGAN, Daniel, ex-'22 
McIntire, Benjamin M., ex-' 10 - 
McKinley, Morrison C, ex-'2i 
Macksey, Raymond E., '21 
Mammel, Albert C, '21 
Mann, Arthur H., '15 



S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Engineers, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Franklin and Marshall College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Convois Autos, A. E. F. 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 

U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

- Corporal, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

Captain, Engineers, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

- Field Artillery 

- U. S. Navy, Foreign Waters 

- Medical Corps 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Lieutenant, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

Ensign, U. S. Navy 
Corporal, Infantry, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Tank Corps 

- Cadet, Naval Aviation 

Q. M. C, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Machine Gun Co., A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, U. S. Air Service 

Corporal, Engineers, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Engineers, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Captain, Ordnance 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Ordnance 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Medical Corps, A. E. F. 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, University of Pennsylvania 



I 

z 



49 



HALCYON 



I 

z 

D 




I 

Z 

D 



50 



^-^^ 



T 
J. 

□ 



D 



Marks, Frank H., '21 - 
Marr, Harold G., ex-' 1 8 - 
Marshall, William H., ex-' I 7 
Martin, Edward E., '78 
Masters, John A., ex-'21 
Matson, J. Burnett, ex-' 18 
Matson, William W., '15 
Maule, Walter W., ex-' 18 
Mealy, John K., ex-' 18 
Mears, Charles S., '21 
Melick, James B., '15 - 
Melick, Joel M-, '14 
Mendelsohn, Louis, ex-' 15 
Mendenhall, J. Horace, ex-'20 
Mercer, E. LeRoy, 
Meredith, Edward R., '03 
Merriam, Lucius B., '22 
Michael, Carl F., ex-'20 - 
Michener, C. Raymond, '19 - 
Mitchell, Foster V., ex-' 17 
Mitchell, James E., '12 
Moldower, Nathaniel B., 
Monaghan, J., '13 
Moore, Harold E., ex-'21 
Moore, Jesse R., '22 
Morgan, Donald S., '21 
Morgan, Roland R, ex-' 19 
MoYLAN, William S., '21 - 
MuNCE, Gordon G., ex-' 18 
MuRCH, John D., '16 
Murfit, Richard, ex-' 12 
Myers, Allen L, '18 
Myers, Charles L. R 
Myers, Clarence G., 
Myrick, Prentiss A., 
NABB, MALVERN J. 

France. 
Nay, C. Paul, '18 
Neff, Charles, ex-'20 
Nehls, Edward C, ex-' 11 



S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Signal Corps, A. E. F. 

- Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

- Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps 
U. S. Air Service 

- U. S. Air Service, A. E. F. 
Lieutenant, Engineers 

Ordnance 

Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. 

U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

----- Captain, Infantry 

S. A, T. C, Hahnemann Medical College 

Ordnance, A. E. F. 

- Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 
Physical Director, Contract Surgeon, S. A. T. C. 

- Captain, Engineers, A. E. F. 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Sergeant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

- . _ - - Lieutenant, Ordnance 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
U. S. Air Service 

Medical Corps 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
- Engineers, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Sergeant, U. S. Ambulance Corps, A. E. F. 
Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation, A. E. F. 
Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation, A. E. F. 

Sergeant, Chemical Warfare Service, A. E. F. 

Hospital Corps, U. S. Navy 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation 

M - - - - - - Artillery, A. E. F. 

ex-' 19, Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 



-'22 



'12 

17 - 



S. A. T. C. 



Killed in action in 

Sergeant, Artillery 
Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, Infantry 



NELSON, ALBERT N., ex-' 19, O. T. C. Died of pneumonia at Camp Zachary 
Taylor. 



^ ^ ^ ^ 



n 



51 



I 
z 

D 



x-'20 



'D 



Neville, Joseph S., 
Nevyas, Jacob, '19 
Nevyas, Jesse, '22 - 
NoRRis, William H. 
Nunez, Robert F., ex-' 18 
Ogden, John M., '19 
Ogden, S. Robinson, ex-' I) 
Olin, Harry A., ex-' 18 
Oppenlander, George S., 
Osmond, Charles, ex-' 15 
Palmer, Edward P., '06 
Park, Pum Koo, '22 
Passmore, Andrew M., ex 
Passmore, Horace B., ex-'20 
Passmore, James, ex-' 18 - 
Pearson, Andrew R., '19 - 
Pearson, Leon M., '20 - 
Peaslee, Amos J., '07, Captain, 
Pennock, Stanley R, ex-' 17 
Perkins, Edward R., '11 - 
PERKINS, T. H. DUDLEY, 
Perry, Horace M., '16 
Pettit, a. Russell, 
Pettit, O. Howard, 
Philips, Charles F. 
Pierce, Allin H., 
Place, George W., 
Pollard, Robert S. 
Pollock, Benjamin 
Pouchot, Francis O., ex-'22 
Powell, George A., '21 
Powell, William, ex-'21 
PowNALL, William J., '22 
Price, Reginald C, ex-'06 
Price, T. Rowe, '19 
Provost, William R., ex-'17 
PuGH, Joseph J., '21 
Putnam, Allen L., '22 
Pyle, F. Lawrence, '16 
QuAYLE, Osborne R., '19 - 
Rath, Morris C, ex-' 11 
Reese, William C, ex-'22 



S. A. T. C. 
S. A. T. C. 



06 



•17 
ex-' I 7 
, ex-' I 9 
19 - 
'21 

'22 - 
, ex-' 13 



Infantry 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Adjutant General's Depot 
Medical Corps 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Ordnance 

'17- - - . - Lieutenant, Depot Brigade 

Signal Corps, A. E. F. 
Captain, Engineers, Courier Service, A. E. F. 

Swarthmore College 
Ordnance 
Swarthmore College 
- Lieutenant, Infantry 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Ordnance; Major, Director Courier Service, A. E. F. 

Sergeant, Cavalry 
Ensign, U. S. Navy 
Captain, Ordnance. Died in the service 
Lieutenant, Military Police Corps, A. E. F. 
Engineers, A. E. F. 
Infantry 
U. S. Naval Reserve Force 
- Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 
A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Infantry 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Quartermaster Sergeant, U. S. Marine Corps 

O. T. C. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, Ordnance 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Signal Corps 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 



S. 
S. 



q 



^^A-^ 



WAR RECORD 



Reid, John S., '13 
Reilly, William J., '18 
Reynolds, Gregg D., '20 
Rhoads, Alfred L., '06 
RicKERT, James R., '22 - 
RiDPATH, William L., ex-' 19 
RiFFERT, John S., '16 - 
Roberts, Harold S., '12 - 
Roberts, Jesse R., ex-' 16 
Robinson, Edmund G., ex-' 14 
Robinson, J. Dorman, '15 
Rogers, John A., ex-' 1 5 
Rogers, Clayton F., '15 
Roy, Harold E., '09 - 
. Rush, John S., '1 3 
Rutter, Edward J., ex-'22 
Sagebeer, Richard G., ex-'22 
Sands, Joseph E., '17 
ScHLESs, Jacob T., '14 - 
ScHOEW, Frederick W., ex-' 19 
Seaman, W. Laurie, '15 
Seligman, James L., ex-' 18 
Sellers, Harry M., '22 
Sharp, Kenneth A., '22 - 
Sharp, Henry M., ex-'22 
Sharpless, Lawrence, '12 
Shemely, William G., ex-'09 
Shepherd, O. D., ex-' 14 
Sheppard, Daniel M., ex-' 1 8 
Sherred, Norman, '15 
Shidle, Norman G., '17 Seam 

Shoemaker, Lester B., ex-' 17 - 
Shoemaker, William McL., '17 
Short, Clarence A., '21 - 
Shrode, p. Carl, '16 
SicKLER, Joseph S., ex-'20 
Simpson, Andrew, '19 - 
Skerrett, Delamere, ex-'87 
Smith, Edmund P., ex-' 19 
Smith, Edward R., '22 
Smith, Gordon, '22 
Smith, Harold L., ex-' 17 - 



Lieutenant, Ordnance 

- - - - Lieutenant, Infantry 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Mechanical Corps 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

First Class Seaman, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

- - - Lieutenant, Ordnance 

Sergeant Major. Infantry 

Depot Brigade 

Infantry 

Ordnance 

Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

Lieutenant, Ordnance 

Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

Corporal, U. S. Signal Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

S. A. T. C, University of Pennsylvania 

Lieutenant, Engineers 

- - - Ensign, U. S. Navy 
- Lieutenant, U. S. Army Aviation 

Captain, Q. M. C. 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Tank Corps 

- Lieutenant, Medical Corps 

U. S. Navy 

- Artillery, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

an. Second Class, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Lieutenant, A. E. F. 
Cadet, U. S. Naval Aviation 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

O. T. C. 

S. A. T. C, University of Pennsylvania 

- Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

- - - Colonel, Coast Artillery 
Lieutenant, Heavy Artillery, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, U. S. Army Air Service, A. E. F. 



53 



I 

7 



Smith, W. Dulty, ex-'05 

Snyder, James R., '13 

SoYARs, William O., '14 

Spackman, G. Donald, '17 

Spring, Wallace N., ex-'21 

Sproul, John R., '1 7 

Stainton, John L., '22 - 

Stallings, Eugene M., ex-'20 

Stephens, John D., '16 

Stewart, Carl B., ex-' 19 - 

Stewart, George W., '22 

Stewart, Samuel T., '03 - 

Stickney, D. John, '19 - 

Stiles, Arthur L., '22 

Stites, Harry J., '15 

Stites, Joseph D., '13 

Stockton, Max R., ex-' 14 

Stone, James A., '10 

Stow, Franklin P., ex-' 19 

Stow, William H., '21 

Stratton, Roland P., ex-' 18 

Straub, Ralph S, '09 

Straubel, Ernest M., ex-'22 

Strong, Henry L., ex-' 18 - 

Stubbs, Harold T., '20 

Taggart, John D., '22 

Tanguay, Lewis L., '16 

Tarble, Newton E., '13 - 

Taylor, Andrew G., ex-'09 - 

Taylor, John G., '15 

Taylor, Robert M., ex-' 19 

Taylor, T. Newbold, ex-' 19 

Taylor, T. R., '12 

Temple, Charles, ex-' 19 - - - 

TERRADELL, RUSSELL J., '19, Corpora 

Died of wounds, October 16, 1918 
Terrell, Frederick B., ex-'05 - 
Thompson, Theodore R., ex-'20 
Thornton, Percy S., ex-' 18 
Thornton, Pierce S., ex-' 18 - 
TiMMis, Walter W., '17 - 
Tisdale, Alexander V., ex-' 15 



Major, U. S. Marine Corps 

Lieutenant, Signal Corps 

- O. T. C, U. S. Marine Corps 

Lieutenant, Heavy Artillery, A. E. F. 

O. T. C. 

Lieutenant, Infantry, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Tank Corps, A. E. F. 

Ordnance 

Lieutenant, U. S. Arntiy Aviation, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- Major, Coast Artillery 

Lieutenant, Ordnance 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, Signal Corps, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

Major, U. S. Ambulance Corps, with ItaUan Army 

- Lieutenant, U. S. Air Service 

- Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

Apprentice Seaman, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Corporal, Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

U. S. Ambulance Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

U. S. Naval Aviation, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
- Ensign, U. S. Navy 

- Lieutenant, Infantry, Courier Service, A. E. F. 

Tank Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, University of Pennsylvania 

Sergeant, Infantry 

Machinist's Mate, U. S. Navy 

Lieutenant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

- ■ - - - - U. S. Navy 

Machine Gun Company, A. E. F. 



Major, Machine Gun Battalion 

A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Medical Corps, U. S. Navy 

- Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

- Ensign, U. S. Navy 



1 

i 



54 



^-A-^ 



WAR RECORD 



I 

z 



ToMLiNsoN, Edwin A., '16 
ToMLiNsoN, Gilbert E., '20 
ToMLiNsoN, William W., '17 
Travilla, Thomas H., ex-' 12 
Twining, H. Earle, '15 
Uhl, Raymond W., ex-'2l 
Valentine, Alan C. 
VanCott, George, '09 
Vanderbilt, Chester W., ex 



Lieutenant, Labor Battalion 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Aviation 

Ensign, U. S. Navy 

Lieutenant, Dental Corps, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Hahnamann Medical College 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Plattsburg Training Camp 

Ensign, U. S. Navy 



.-'20 - - Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Vernon, Ralph B., ex-' 13, Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserve Force, Foreign "Waters 
ViSNISKKI, Guy T., '98 - - Major, Editor of "Stars and Stripes," A. E. F. 



Field Artillery, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Captain, Q. M. C. 

Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

Corporal, Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Lieutenant, Signal Corps 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
Sergeant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

Corporal, U. S. Air Service, A. E. F. 
Captain, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Engineers, A. E. F. 

- Base Hospital Unit No. 20, A. E. F. 

Lieutenant, Engineers, A. E. F. 

Master Engineer, Engineers, A. E. F. 

S. A. T. C, Brown University 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Field Artillery 
- Lieutenant, Infantry 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
- Lieutenant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 

- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

Lieutenant, Ordnance, A. E. F. 



VoELKER, Edward, ex-' 1 9 - 
Walker, Harry E., ex-'22 
Walker, Robert H., '02 - 
Wall, Charles R., '15 
Wallen, Seeley, a., '02 - 
Walter, Clinton E., ex-'20 - 
Wassman, Charles W., '20 
Watson, Joseph A., 'II 
Webb, Samuel B., '21 
Webb, Walter C, ex-' 16 
Weeks, Walter A., ex-' 15 
Welter, Charles H., '09 
West, George M., '21 
Westcott, Milton R., ex-'21 
Wetherald, J. Stanley, '15 
Wheatley, Earl R., ex-'20 - 
White, Edward E., ex-' 17 
White, John C, '15 
White, John J., ex-'21 
White, Russell, '21 
Whittier, John W., ex-'22 
Wickersham, Francis D., ex-'22 
Wickham, Otto W., ex-' 11 
Widener, Dean C, '18 
Wiese, J. Frederic, '21 
Williams, John S., '15 - 
Wilson, Ralph E., '20 - 
Wise, Malcolm R., ex-'22 
Worth, William A., '14 - 

Wright, Ralph M., ex-' 18 Infantry 

Yarnall, Russell A., ex-'20. Sergeant, Trench Mortar Battery, A. E. F. War 
Cross 



q 



.-A--^ 



I 

z 



- Lieutenant, Field Artillery 

Lieutenant, Infantry 

- Infantry 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 

S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 



Yates, Joseph F., ex-' 1 8 

YoDER, Clarence H., '20 - 

Young, Frederick C, '13 - 

Young, William C, '22 - 

Young, William C, Jr., '22 

Zane, Charles R., ex-'22 - 

ZANE, RANDOLPH T., '09, Major, U. S. Marine Corps, A. E. F. Killed in 

action 
Zeitlin, Robert M., ex-'21 
Zerega, John W., ex-' 18 



- S. A. T. C, Swarthmore College 



Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserve Force 
- Artillery School, A. E. F. 



!^acK of tl)e Clnes 



It is often difficult to differentiate between the first-line men and the men "back of 
the lines." In many cases the contribution of the latter — both men and women of 
Swarthmore — meant more than just "essential war work," and m one case it meant the 
supreme sacrifice. Professor Roy B. Pace gave up his life in service "back of the lines." 
Swarthmore boasted about half a hundred non-combatant war workers, whose service we 
have attempted to indicate in the following record: 

Baker, Ralph J., '07 - Assistant General Counsel, Alien Property Custodian 

Barnes, H. Freeman. '18 Y. M. C. A. 

Baum, Richard T., ex-' 19 - - - Red Cross Supply Train, France 

Brooks, Robert C, Professor of Political Science - - - Red Cross 



Burdsall, E. Morris, '17 
BuRDSALL, Richard, L., '17 
CoKER, Gladys, '11 
Collins, Byron S., '15 
Denworth, Hugh F., '16 
Farquar, R. B., '00 - 
Gemmill, Paul F., '17 - 
Hayes, William Waldo, ' 1 8 
Hough, Israel E., ex-'20 
howells, folger b., '13 - 
Jenkins, William L., '10 
Lamb, Philip C, '06 - 
Lesley, Victoria C, '14 



Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 

Friends Reconstruction Unit, Pans 

- Y. M. C. A. Canteen, Paris 

Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 

United States Food Administration 

Information mcomplete 

Y. M. C. A., Overseas 

Friends Reconstruction Unit, Red Cross, Overseas 

Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 

Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 

American Consul at Odessa, Russia 

- Y. M. C. A., Paris 



Y. M. C. A. Canteen, Paris 
Linton, William H., '05, Manager of Commissary Department, New York Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation 
McDowell, Carleton, '09 - - - Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 
Messner, Henry, '13 Y. M. C. A., Paris 



I 

z 
□ 



56 



^-A-^ 



T 

1 



D 



WAR RECORD 




Miller, Anna Lippincott, '15 Red Cross, Paris 

Morgan, E. Tasso, '17 - Planes Inspection Bureau of Aircraft Production 

PACE, ROY BENNETT, Assistant Professor of English, Y. M. C. A. Died of 

disease on August 30, 1918, at Blois, France. 
Palmer, A. Mitchell, '91 - - - - Alien Property Custodian 

Pearson, Paul M., Professor of Public Speaking - Red Cross, Y. M. C. A. 
Price, W. W., '12 - - - - - Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 

Reid, John S., '13 - - - - - - Wisconsin Gun Works 

Reinheimer, Malvin, '12 - - - - - - - Y. M. C. A. 

RiCKMAN, Lydia Lewis, '06 - - Friends Relief Work, England, Russia 

Rittman, Walter F., '09, Consulting Chemical Engineer, Bureau of Mines and 
Chemical Warfare Service 

Friends Reconstruction Unit, Pans 

'14 - Manager of Home for French Orphans, France 

ex-' 1 5 - - - Friends Reconstruction Unit, Pans 

Patent Department, Bureau of Aircraft Production 

Director of Bureau of Trusts, Alien Property Custodian 

'14- - - - Employee in War Department 

16 - - . , - War Camp Community Service 

Director Hostess House, Y. W. C. A. 

'1 1 War Prisoners' Aid, Y. M. C. A., Bern, Switzerland 

, ex-' 13 - - - - - - Y. M. C. A. 

ex-'02. Professor of Military Science and Tactics, State Col- 



Smith, Walter E., '17 
Speakman, Martha T., 
Stephens, D. Owen, e> 
Stone, James A., '10 
Stone, Ralph, '89 
Strang, Albert R., 
Tanguay, Lewis L., 
Truman, Mary, '09 
Tyler, W. Russell, 
VanSyckel, James S 
Wallen, Seeley a., 

lege, N. M. 
White, Frances M., 



'91 



Friends Reconstruction Unit, Paris 




I 



57 



^-A--A 



HALCYON 



z 




58 






iseraDles 



u 



^-^-^ 



SENIORS 




2^V 



5LNI0R 




J 
I 

Z 
D 



CLASS OFFICERS 

FIRST SEME.STER .SECOND SEMESTER 

yVlaryEW.Uor, PRESIDENT Ailm P.'^rc^ 

Jan<^PJ.rown VICE PRESIDENT JohnM. 0<,den 

EleanorJ\.J\onK Sf.CnETARY HdenR-Biddle 

XuthHCoos TREASURER IsabclB.M»y.rs. 




I 

z 



59 



HALCYON 



I 



D 




I 

Z 
D 



60 



^-A--^ 



Senior 4^ersonalla 



Alice Naomi Adams, k a 0, Swarthmore 

"Keep the home fires burning' 
Prepared at Swarthmore High School. 



Psychology and Education 



Charles Colliday Ashmead, Beesley's Point, N. J. - Electrical Engineering 

"Oh, pomps and vanities of this xeicked world, I hate you!" 
Prepared at Pleasantville High School 

Eleanor Williams Atkinson, Trenton, N. J. - - - - German 

"Fire! Fire! Pour on mater" 

Prepared at State Model School, Trenton; Class Hockey (MITII-IV) ; Class 
Swirrming (I-II-III-IV) ; Class Basketball (MI-III-IV) ; 'Varsity Hockey 
(II-III-IV) ; Halcyon Staff; Phoenix; Head Fire Captain; Chairman War 
Council; Mortar Board; <t B K. 



c 



Z 



J 
I 

z 

D 



ii 


r -t 



Ardis Mayhew Baldwin, K K r, Baltimore, Md. - English 
"Alack, there lies more peril in thine eyes 
Than twenty of their swords" 
Prepared at Parker Collegiate Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
Friends' School, Baltimore; Y. W. C. A.; Somerville; Soph 
Show Scenery Committee ; Halcyon ; Phoenix. 

Judson Tupper Ballard, K S, Philadelphia - Chemistry 
"A Man Well Liked by Men, and Women, Too" 
Prepared at Northeast High School; Track (H ; 
Cheer Leader (IIITV) ; Manager of Baseball (III) 
ager of Hamburg Show (Hi) ; Class Prezidcr.t ( 
Kwink; Book and Key. 



Head 

Man- 

II-2); 



SHEEPISH 



NoRRis Clements Barnard, * k *, Brooklyn, N. Y., Mechani- 
chcl Engineering 

"Good Manners Are Made Up of Petty Sacrifices" 

Prepared at Manual Training High School, Brooklyn ; La- 
crosse (III); Lacrosse Manager (IV) ; Soph Show; Secretary 
of Ensineers' Club (III-l ) ; Vice President Athletic Associa- 
tion (IV) ; Treasurer Y. M. C. A. (IV) ; Musical Clubs 
(III) ; Captain, S. A. T. C. 




HI 



I 

7 



Catherine Reading Belville, K K r, Trenton, N. J. - - Economics 

"There are smiles that make us /lappp" 
Prepared at State Model School, Trenton; Class Gym Team (I-IITII); "Varsity 
Gym Team (III); Winner of Declamation Contest (III); Soph Show; Phoenix; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabmet (III); Student Government Executive Committee (III-1, 
IV-2) ; President Student Government (IV-I); Class Secretary (1-2); Mortar 
Board ; T I K. 



Helen Roberta Biddle, K A 0, Riverton, N. J. . - 

Too Much Mustard" 
Prepared at Friends' High School, Moorestown, N. J.; 'Varsity Hockey (I-II-III- 
IV); Class Hockey (I-IMIITV) ; Class Secretary (II-I, IV-2); Glee Club; 
Soph Show ; r I K. 



Biology I — 



Ruth Breuninger, n B $, Washington, D. C. 

"Then Along Came Ruth" 
Prepared at George Washington University; Y. W. C. A. 

Jane Pancoast Brown, n b $, Leesburg, Va. . _ . - 

"The Apostle of Paul" 
Prepared at Lincoln High School; Class Basketball (III); Class Vice 
(IV); Y. W. C. A.; Somerville. 



French 

English 
President 



Janet McPherson Brown, AT, Washington, D. C. - - Ps^cholog}; 

"The Song of David" 
Prepared at Friends' School, Washington, D. C. ; Secretary Soph Show Executive 
Committee; Halcyon Staff; Secretary Women's Student Government (II-l); Y. 
W. C. A. Social Service Committee (III), Sub-chairman (IV); Somerville. 

Edward Clayton Carris, $ K *, Haddonfield, N. J. - Electrical Engineering 

"Lead Kindl]) Light" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; 'Varsity Baseball (I-II-III-IV) , Captain (III- 

IV); Manager Basketball (III-IV) ; Soph Show; 
Class President (II-2) ; President Executive Com- 
mittee Men's Student Government (IV-1), Mem- 
ber (IV-2) ; Corporal S. A. T. C. ; Engineers Club; 
Devils; Book and Key. 



m 



■v^ 




INDIAN COHN-OG 



Viola Martha Conner, Wilmington Del. History 
"I am Viola; which to confirm. 
Til bring you a captain to this town." 
Prepared at Wilmington High School; Chairman 
Employment Bureau; Y. W. C. A.; Somerville. 

William Lindsay Cornog, ay, Ithan - Chemistry 
"Patience, and Shuffle the Cards" 
Prepared at Radnor High School; Football Squad 
(I-II-III); 'Varsity Football (IV); Track (III); 
Penn Relay Team (III) ; Soph Show; Devils. 



I 

z 

D 



62 



A--^-^ 



SENIORS 



Mary InGRAHM CroslEY, K a 0, Melrose Park - - - - 

"There's a Lillle Bit of Bad in Every Cood Llllle Girl" 
Prepared at Cheltenham High School; Soph Show; Phoenix; Y. W. C. A, 



English 




Ruth Hay Cross, n B $, Cynwyd, Malhematics 
"Cross-ing the Bar-nard" 
Prepared at Philadelphia High School for 
Girls; Soph Show; Flower Girl, May Day; 
Class Sub-Treasurer (1-2); Class Treasurer 
(IV-1); Treasurer Women's Student Gov- 
ernment (IV-1); Treasurer Somerville 
(III) ; Mathematics Club; Y. W. C. A. 



-AXD RfTH 



I 

z 



1 

7 



Dorothea Lindsay Darlington, a r, Darhng - - - - Biology 
"She Was Combing Her Chestnut Hair; 
It Was Hanging Upon a Chair" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; Class Hockey (I-II-III-IV) ; 'Varsity Hockey 
(IV); Class Gym (I-II-III-IV), Captam (I-II) ; 'Varsity Gym (I-II- 
III-IV); Class Basketball (I-II-III-IV), Captam (III); Athletic Council 
(II-IV); President of Women's Athletic Association (IV); 'Varsity Manager 
(IV) ; Somerville. 



Katherine Vande\ORT Fahnestock, II B 0, Harrisburg, 
"Give Me an Audience for a Word or Two" 

Prepared at Harrisburg High School; Class Swimming Team 
(II-III-IV), 'Varsity (III-IV), Captam (III); Class 
Hockey Team (II-III-IV), 'Varsity (IV) ; Class Gym Team 
(I-II-III-IV), 'Varsity (I-II-III-IV); Soph Show; Extem- 
poraneous Speaking Contest, Second Place (I), First Place 
(II-III); Declamation Contest (III-IV); Halcyon Staff; 
Table Committee; Somerville; Y. W. C. A. Secretary (II), 
President (IV); Women's Athletic Association; Mortar 
Board. 



e? ^ e 'Qf 



Public Speaking 




HERE KITTY 



63 



I 




Elizabeth Newman Frorer, KKT, Philadelphia, Mathematics 

"I've Been Working in the Corn Field" 

Prepared at Philadelphia High School for Girls; Women's 
Athletic Association; Senior Elector (IV) ; I. C. S. A. ; Som- 
erville, Assistant Auditor (II-2, III-l), Auditor (III-2, 
II-l), Assistant Secretary (III), Corresponding Secretary 
(IV). , 



Doris Mellor Gilbert, 
"Lost 



AAA, Philadelphia 
and Found" 



BAREFOOT BETTY 



Prepared at West Philadelphia High School 
Pennsylvania (III); Class Basketball (I); 
(I-II) ; Secretary Math Club. 



Mathematics 



University of 
Class Hockey 



Franklin Simcoe Gillespie, $ k *, Swarthmore 

"Oh, 'Tis Excellent to Have a Giant's Strength" 
Prepared at Mercersburg Academy; Football Squad (I), 'Varsity Football (II- 



III) ; Baseball Squad (I-II), Assistant Manager (III) ; Kwink; Devils, 
from Army Aviation, Second Lieutenant. 



Returned 



Hisiorxi 



Mary Hall Goodall, IT B <^, Philadelphia 

"/ Would Rather Be Sick Than Idle" 

Prepared at West Philadelphia High School; Soph Show; Y. W. C. A.; Somer- 
ville; Women s Athletic Association. 

Russell Conv/ELL Gourley, K 2, Philadelphia - - - Political Sc'.ence 

"It Becomes a Man to Be Modest" 

Prepared at Cheltenham High School; Baseball (III-IV) ; Basketball (III) ; Soph 
Shovi^; Debate (IV); Class Treasurer (III-2) ; Devils. Returned from Naval 
Aviation, Ensign. 



Edwin Tudor Gowdy, ^ 2 K, Thompsonville, Conn. 

"Here Comes Tootsie" 



History 



Prepared at Enfield High School; 'Varsity Track (III); Soph Show; Class 
Marshall, Founders' Day (II); Class Vice President (III-l); Glee Club (I-II- 
III) ; Captain, S. A. T. C. ; Kwink; Book and Key. 



Josephine Murray Griffiths, Norristown 

"Work, for the Night Is Coming 
When Table Lists Are Due" 



Mathematics 



Prepared at Norristown High School; Class Hockey (I-II-III-IV) ; Treasurer 
Women's Student Government (III-l), Executive Committee (IV-2) ; Y. W. C. 
A.; Table Committee; Women's Athletic Association; Treasurer Red Cross (IV). 



.^ 



n 



64 



'4^4^-4^ 



SENIORS 



±_ 




Margaret Haviland, n b $, Brooklyn N. Y. - French 

"Peg o' Mv Heart" 

Prepared at Brooklyn Friends' School; Soph Show; Y. 
W. C. A. Cabinet (IV); Women's Athletic Association; 
Somerville. 



Esther Rachel Hayes, Swarthmore - - English 

"They Are Never Alone That Are 
Accompanied by Nohh Thoughts" 

Prepared at Swarthmore High School; Swimming Team (II) ; 
Somerville Day Play; I. C. S. A.; Somerville. 



PEG HAVA-HEART 



Elisabeth Andrews Hibberd, k k r, Oakland, Cal. 

"Hello, 'Frisco!" 
Prepared at Oakland High School; Entered from University of California. 



English 



z 



J 

r 

z 



David Malcolm Hodge, Chester Political Science 

"Polly-Wolly-Doodle All the Day" 

Prepared at Chester High School; Soph Show; Soph-Fresh Debate (I-II) ; Second 
Prize in Extemporaneous Speaking Contest (II); Founders' Day Play (I-II-III). 



CuSHMAN Jacob Hoke, B IT, Indianapolis, Ind. 

"Oh for a Life on the Ocean Wave!" 
Entered from Depauw University; Corporal, S. A. T. C. 



AY 



Mill 



ville, 



N. J., 



Charles Manly Howell, 
M echanical Engineering 

"An Athlete of Brain and Brawn" 

Prepared at Millville High School ; 'Varsity Football 
(III-IV) ; President Y. M. C. A.; Executive Com- 
mittee Men's Student Government (IV-1) ; Lieuten- 
ant, S. A. T. C; Book and Key; >; T. 



Phillis MlKI Kgmori, White Plains, N. Y. Latin 

"Madam Butterfly" 

Prepared at Brooklyn Friends' School; Soph Show; 
Halcyon Staff; War Council; Somerville; Mortar 
Board. 




:=r-»^-• 



HE'S A DEVn. IN HIS 
OWN HOME TOWN 



HALCYON 





YOU STOP 



Dorothy Fordyce Lucas, Atlantic City, N. J. - History 
"The Sunshine of Your Smile" 
Prepared at Woodbury High School ; Women's Athletic As- 
sociation ; Y. W. C. A. ; I. C. S. A. ; Somerville, Librarian 
(III). 

Bess McClellan, a r, Arden, N. Y. - - French 
'Clad Music to Pour Forth on Every Irish Ear" 
Prepared at Tuxedo High School and Munroe High School; 
Chairman Soph Show Music Committee ; Class Secretary 
(III-l); Y. W. C. A. 



English 



Marie Louise Meeteer, Middletown, N. Y. - 

"Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning" 
Prepared at Hackensack High School; Women's Athletic Asscoiation; Somerville; 
Y. W. C. A. 

Isabel Briggs Myers, K K r, Washington, D. C. - - - Political Science 

"Fve But One Chief Delight" 
Prepared at Western High School, Washington, D. C. ; Class Hockey (I-III-IV) ; 
Class Gym (I-IMII) ; 'Varsity Gym (LII-III) ; Class Swimming (I-II- 
III); 'Varsity Swimming (II-III) ; Class Basketball (I-II-III) ; Class Treasurer 
(IV-2) ; Anson Lapham Scholarship (I); Samuel J. Underbill Scholarship (II); 
Deborah Fisher Wharton Scholarship (III); Freshman Latin Prize (I), Secretary 
Phoenix Advisory Board (IILIV) ; Associate Editor 1919 Halcvon ; Soph Show; 
Chairman War Basis Committee (III) ; Vice President Women's A. A. (Ill), 
President Elect (IV) ; Mortar Board; $ B K. 



c 



Z 



7 



Charles Raymond MicheneR, $ 2 K, Bendersville - Mechanical Engineering 

"He Is the Very Pineapple of Politeness" 
Prepared at West Chester Normal School; 'Varsity Lacrosse (III); Glee Club 
(I-IMII), Manager (III); Assistant Manager 1919 Halcyon ; President Engi- 
ners Club (IV). 



Jacob Nevyas, West Chester - - - Chemistry 

"Conspicuous by His Absence" 
Prepared at West Chester High School; P. M. Sharpies 
Scholar (1915-1919); Fresh-Soph Wrestling Contest (MI), 
Winner (I) ; Corporal, S. A. T. C. 

Esther Anne Newcomer, a r, Philadelphia - Economics 
"/ Never Could Tread a Single Pleasure Under Fool" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; Class Hockey (I-II-III- 
IV), Captain (IV) ; 'Varsity Hockey (IV) ; Women's Ath- 
letic Association; Soph Show; Somerville; Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
net (IV) ; D. A. S. 




NOT MATCHED- 
IN SHOES. 
WE MEAN 



^-A-^ 



SENIORS 



a 




John Mahlon Ogden, $ K ^I", Ogden - Economics 

"Oh Horn Shall the Young Secure Their Hearts" 

Prepared at Chester High School; 'Varsity Baseball (I-II- 
III) ; 'Varsity Basketball (III) ; Executive Committee Men's 
Student Government (IV-2) ; Class Vice President (IV-2); 
Sergeant, S. A. T. C. ; Devils. 



Harry Arthur Olin, k 2, Chicago 

"Domestic Happiness' 



Political Science 



Prepared at Lane Tech. High School, Chicago; 'Varsity Track (I-II-III) ; 'Var- 
sity Basketball (I-II) ; Football (MI), 'Varsity (III); Class Basketball (II-III) ; 
Local Editor The Phoenix (III), Editor-elect (IV); Halcyon Staff; President- 
elect Men's Athletic Association (IV); Class President (II-l), Treasurer (I-l), 
Vice President (1-2) ; Founders' Day Play (II) ; Soph 
Show; Monks; Book and Key. Returned from Ordnance, 
First Lieutenant. 



Ruth Marie Orndorff, Philadelphia 
"Tickle-Toe" 



English 



Prepared at West Philadelphia High School; Hockey (IV) : 
Gym (III) ; Athletic Council (III) ; Somerville Librarian. 





RUTHLESS 



□ 



r 



Edgar Zavitz Palmer, Ridley Park - Political Science 
"He Makes a Solitude and Calls it Peace" 
Prepared at Chester High School. 



FKIENDS 
KECON.STRUCTION 



^ ^ e 



67 



^-A--A 



HALCYON 



r 

z 




A PHOENIX BIKD 



Andrew Russell Pearson, K S, Swarthmore - Economics 

"Reason Shall Prevail With Me More Than Popular Opinion" 

Prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy and Swarthmore Prep ; 
'Varsity Lacrosse (II) ; 'Varsity Swimming (I-II) ; 'Varsity 
Debate (III) ; Treasurer Athletic Association (IV) ; Hon- 
orable Mention Oratorical Contest (III) ; Honorable Mention 
Declamation Contest (IV) ; Extemporaneous Speaking Con- 
test (II); Editor of Phoenix; Manager of Founders' Day 
Play (I); Director of Soph Show; Executive Committee 
Men's Student Government (IV-1 ) ; Class Treasurer (II-I ) ; 
Corporal, S. A. T. C. ; A 2 P ; Book and Key. 



Allin Hugh Pierce, a Y, Fort Dodge, la. - Economics 

"I Dare Do All That Mav Become a Man; Who Dares Do 
More Is None" 

Prepared at Fort Dodge High School ; Western Swarthmore 
Club Scholar 1915-1916; Cross Country (I); 'Varsity 
Track (I-II-III-IV), Captam (IV); Football Squad (II- 
III); Class Treasurer (III-I); Class Vice President-elect 
(IV-I ) ; Class President (IV-2) ; Executive Committee 
Men's Student Government (III-2), President-elect (IV-1), 
President (IV-2); Business Manager 1919 Halcyon ; 
Phoenix Advisory Board (III) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (III) ; 
Debate Team (I-II-III), Captain (III); Oratorical Contest 
(I-III), Winner (III); Potter Extemporaneous Speaking 
Contest (I-II); Fresh-Soph Debate (I-II); Third Place in 
Pennsylvania Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest (III) ; Vice 
President Pennsylvania Intercollegiate Oratorical Union (III', 
President (IV); Secretary-Treasurer Debate Board (III), 
President-elect (IV); ASP; Devils; Book and Key. Re- ,,„^„^„ ^,„, 

df IVT 1 A ■ ■ ANOTHFjR IiIIiI)- 

rrom IN aval Aviation. wvih WI^'Gs 





Margaret Elgar Powell, Lansdowne 

"Tell Me Why the Stars Do Shine" 
Prepared at George School. 



Aslronomyi 



WHAT CARE I 
FOR PRICES 



Thomas Rowe Price, Jr., a Y, Glyndon, Md. - Chemistry 

"It May Be Said He Never Passed a Bonnet 
Without a Loolj; Beneath, or Comment on it" 

Prepared at Franklin High School and Baltimore Friends' 
School; 'Varsity Lacrosse (III); Manager Football (IV); 
Manager Swimming Team (III); Class President (III-l); 
Soph Show; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Corporal, S. A. T. C. 



z 

D 



68 



SENIORS 



I 



Elizabeth Pyle, Washington, D. C. - -^- - - ■ French 

"So Long Belly" 
Prepared at Western High School, Washington, D. C. ; Gym Team (I); Swim- 
ming Team (I) ; Somerville. 

Osborne Robinson Quayle, a y, Wilmington, Del. - Chemical Engineering 

"He Was. a Cenlle Youth" 
Prepared at Wilmington High School; 'Varsity Track (II-III) ; 'Varsity Cross 
Country (II); President Athletic Association; Lieutenant, S. A. T. C. 



Gladys Amanda Reichard, Bangor - Latin 

"/'// Rise up in the Morn 
And Help to Hoe ihe Corn." 
Prepared at Bangor High School; Executive Com- 
mittee Women's Student Government (III) ; Mortar 
Board; # B K. 

Helen Hutchinson Reid, Lansdowne - History 
"Get Out and Get Under" 
Prepared at Lansdowne High School; Class Basket- 
ball (I) ; Somerville. 




BECKY 



Helen Koons Robey, a r, Philadelphia 



Public Speaking 



"What's This Dull ToTvn to Me 



Robert's Not Near" 
Prepared at Germantown Friends' School and Friends' Central School 
(I-II-III) ; Soph Show; Pubhc Speaking Contest (III) ; Somerville. 



Glee Club 



Economics 



Eleanor Rae Runk, k k r, Philipsburg . . . - 

"Hang Sorrorx), Care'll Kill a Cat" 
Prepared at Philipsburg High School; Class Hockey (IV); Soph Show; Secre- 
tary Glee Club (III) ; President I. C. S. A. (IV) ; Vice President Women s Stu- 
dent Government (III); President Women's Student Government (IV-2) ; Class 
Secretary (IV) ; A A 2. 



Irma Kipp Russell, K a O, Bedford, Psy- 
chology 
"Don't Take My Darling Boy Arvay" 
Prepared at Bedford High School; Soph 
Show; Glee Club (I-II); Y. W. C. A.; 
Chairman War Basis Committee (IV) ; 
Somerville; Class Chairman (II); I. C. 
S. A. 




AT lTi:l! rOfNTAlN 
Ob' YOUTH 



□ 



69 



■ A--A-^ 



HALCYON 



Helene Barrett Scott, <!> 5 $, Wilmington, Del. 



French 



"Comme je I'aime!" 
Prepared at Wilmington Friends' School ; Soph Show ; Y. W. C. A. ; Somerville ; 
Classical Club; I. C. S. A. 




NEVER-CtISS 



Phebe Underhill Seaman, k a ©, Jericho, N. Y. 

Hislor}) 
"What a Beautiful Pussv You Are" 
Prepared at Friends' Academy ; Treasurer Red Cross 
(III), Chairman (IV); War Council (IV); Y. W. 
C. A.; Somerville, Assistant Treasurer (II). 

Andrew Simpson, K 2, Darby - Electrical Engineering 
"Stern Men With Empires in Their Brains" 
Prepared at Swarthmore Prep.; Lacrosse (II-III-IV), 
Captam (III-IV) ; Soccer (ITMII), Manager (III), 
Captain-elect (IV); President-elect Athletic Associa- 
tion (IV); Associate Editor 1919 Halcyon ; Stage 
Manager Soph Show; Class Treasurer (II-l); Class 
President-elect (IV-I); Engmeers Club; Mathematics 
Club ; 2 T ; Devils ; Book and Key. Returned from 
Field Artillery, Second Lieutenant. 



n 



David John Stickney, k 2, Buffalo, N. Y. Chemisir]) 

"If This Fa I, the Pillared Firmament Is Rottenness, and 
Earth's Base Built on Stubble" 

Prepared at Buffalo High School; Soccer (II-III), 

Manager-elect (IV); Glee Club (I-II-III) ; Tennis 

-•- (II-III), Manager-elect (IV); Class President-elect 

r— r (IV-I). Returned from Ordnance, Second Lieutenant. 

Elizabeth Stotsenburg, Ridley Park 

/Psychology and Education 
_ "Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful" 

, — I Prepared at Ridley Park High School ; Treasurer Glee 

Club (III) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (III) ; Somerville. 

Elinor Christina Stout, a © n, Wenonah, N. J. 

"The Heart Is Wiser Than the Intellect' 
Prepared at Woodbury High School ; Somerville. 




THE OLD COME-B.iCK 



Historv 



Esther Gertrude Taylor, Philadelphia English 

"Oh, for a Thousand Tongues to Sing" 
Prepared at West Philadelphia High School and Girls' High School; Soph Show; 
Glee Club (MI-III); Somerville. 



70 



SENIORS 



^^^^ 



Leonard Kittinger Moore Taylor, West Chester - Mechanical Engineering 

"What a Spendthrift Is He of His Tongue" 
Prepared at Friends' Graded School, West 
Chester; "Varsity Track (III); Engineers 
Club. 



Dorothy Thomas, k k r. Glen Cove, N. Y., 
French 

"The Old Maids' Ball" 
Prepared at Friends' Academy, L. I.; 
Soph Show; Secretary Cercle Francais; \. 
W. C. A. ; Somerville. 




THREE LITTLE MAIDS 
FROM SCHOOL 



Q 



I 
Z 



Helene Carlotta Toerring, Philadelphia 

"/ Aint Cot No Lolly-Pop' 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; Somerville. 



Mary Headley VeRNAM, a r, Trenton, N. J. - Biologv 

"Oh Captain, Ml) Captain!" 
Prepared at State Model School, Trenton, N. J. ; Class 
Basketball (I-IITII-IV) , Captam (I); 'Varsity Basket- 
ball (II-IIITV), Captain (IV); Class Hockey (I-II-III- 
IV), Captain (II); 'Varsity Hockey (II-IIMV), Captam 
(IV); Class Gym Squad (I-IF; Soph Show; Class Secre- 
tary (II-2) ; Executive Committee Women's Student Gov- 
ernment (III-l, IV-1); Secretary Women's Athletic Associ- 
ation (II); Delegate Athletic Association Conference; Ath- 
letic Council (IV) ; Mortar Board; A A 2. 



Historv —, 




BLACK DOG 




Biology 



WAKE-IXG HEIi BH'.LK 



Marian Cleveland Ware, A ® n, Salem, N. J. 
"Could the Photographer Bui Seize 
The Moment We Look Pleasant, Please" 
Prepared at Salem High School; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 
Vice President Y. W. C. A. (IV) ; Treasurer Women's 
Student Government (IV-2) ; War Council (IV); HAL- 
CYON; Assistant Corresponding Secretary of Somerville (II), 
Vice President (III). 



Elizabeth Atkinson Watson, Doylestown - History 

"There's a Quaker Down in Quakertorvn" 

Prepared at Doylestown High School; Y. W. C. A. 



z 

I 

J 



71 



r 
z 



Harold Shoemaker Webster, a Y, Philadelphia - Mechanical Engimenng 
"Great Oaks From Liiile Acorns CroTi>" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; Manager Baseball (IV); 'Varsity Soccer 
(III), Manager-elect (IV); Corporal, S. A. T. C. ; Engineers Club (I-IIIII), 
Secretary-Treasurer (III), President (IV); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



Frances Baker Williams, a r, Norristown, PoUlkal 
Science 

" 'N Everything" 

Prepared at Friends' Central School; Class Hockey 
(I-II-III-IV) ; 'Varsity Hockey (IV) ; Class Bas- 
ketball (I-II-III-IV); 'Varsity Basketball (III- 
IV) ; Class Gym Team (I-II-III) ; Treasurer Wom- 
en's Athletic Association (III) ; Athletic Association 
Council (IV) ; Phoenix Staff (III) ; Associate Edi- 
tor of Phoenix (IV); Halcyon Staff; Executive 
Committee Women's Student Government (III-2, 
IV) ; President of Somerville (IV) ; Mortar Board; 

r I K. 



^HTsV^^^H 


■ 


Hyifc...'.' s 


■E^ 


^Br * r-^^l 


HI'w ■'^'^ 


■ ;'i» ^^H 


^Hlt' 


m\ 'a^I 


^^Mi 


K ^ ^^H 




B-M.*' ^H 


^^^^^K' 






■'' * >■ ^^^^1 





PrXCH AND JUDY 



English 



Mary Elizabeth Wilson, n B <i>, Toughkenamon 

"President Wilson" 
Prepared at Kennett Square High School; Soph Show; Class Secretary (I-l ) ; Class 
President (IV-I); Executive Committee Women's Student Government (IV); Y. 
W. C. A. ; Somerville. 

Charles Henry Yardley, $ a 0, York - . - - Mathematics 

"For He, by Geometric Scale, 
Could Take the Size of Pots of Ale" 
Prepared at York High School; Soph Show; Halcyon ; Mathematics Club. 

Dorothy Young, K a 0, Easton, Public 

Speaking 

"Oh Johnniz, Oh Johnnie, Oh!" 
Prepared at George School ; Class Hockey 
(I-II-III-IV) ; Class Basketball (I-II-III) ; 
Class Swimming (I); Women's Athletic 
Association; Soph Show; Somerville Play 
(II) ; Founders' Day Play (II-III) ; Sec- 
ond Prize Declamation Contest (II) ; Sec- 
ond Prize Extemporaneous Speaking Con- 
test (III) ; Women's Debate Team (III) ; 
Women's Glee Club (I-II) ; Somerville; 
Secretary of I. C. S. A. (Ill); Vice 
President I. C. S. A. (IV) ; President I. 
C. S. A. (IV) ; r I K. 

I'OUNG OGDEN 




I 

z 

D 



» ^ 



72 



^-A-^ 



SENIORS 




UElt STAFF OF LIFE 



Edith Young, Swarthmore - Mathematics 

"How Firm a Foundation" 

Prepared at Wiliiam Penn High School, 
Philadelphia; Class Hockey (I-II-III-IV) ; 
"Varsity Hockey (III-IV) ; Class Swimming 
(I-II) ; Soph Show; Mathematics Club; I. C. 
S. A. ; Y. W. C. A. 



English 



Frances Willard Young, k K r, Germantown . . . . 
"Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes" 
Prepared at Camden High School; Social Committee Y. W. C. A. (III-IV); 
Chairman Junior Somerville Day; Executive Committee Women's Student Govern- 
ment (IV) ; War Basis Committee (III) ; War Council (IV) ; T I K. 



Helen Gertrude Young, West Chester . - - - Mathematics 

"My Lady of the Telephone" 
Prepared at West Chester High School; Class Swimming (I-II), Captain (III); 
Somerville. 



I 

z 

D 



I 
7 

a 








7■^ 



"Ex-Mlembers of 1919 



n 



Walter Halsey Abell 
Virginia E. Adams, n B $ 
Mabel Pound Adams, K a © 
Rutherford M. Baker 
Leslie S. Bingham, * a 
Miriam Jones Bowman, k a ® 
Ruth Williams Carter, HBO 
Melanie W. Dolman 
Emma E. Donohugh 
Irma L. Dunning 
Hannah L. Foulke 
Frances B. Fricke 
Edwin L. Frost, $ 2 K 
Marion V. Gerlitzki 
Charles D. Gilchrist, * 2 K 
Sarah E. Goff 
Mary D. Greist, n b <i> 



William W. Hewitt 

Charles Irwin Johnson 

Byron L. Jones, k 2 

Beulah M. Kerns 

Madeline Krauskopf 

Jessie Louise Lewis, k a 

Dorothy Herman Lukens, a r 

Mildred Tily McFarland, K K r 

Dorothy J. Mackenzie 

Helen M. Miller 

James Howard Molloy, <I> a 

Charles F. Philips, K 2 

Marian A. Stokes, k k r 

Nora B. Waln, k k r 

John B. West 

Charles M. Weston 

Margaret W. Wheelock, k K r 



□ 



z 



Former ^Members of the Class of 1919 who are or have been in the service 
are mentioned in the Swarthmore ^^'ar Record. 



74 



-A--^ 



JUNIORS 



i 



I 

J 




n 



75 



'^>-4X^. 



r 
z 




JOHN GILBERT ALBERTSON 

HILLSDALE, N. J. 

Chemislrv 

Behold, ladies and gentlemen. Jack the Lady-killer! 
1 o look at him, you'd never put him down as a he-vamp — 
tliat is, judging from his innocent smile and child-like ap- 
pearance — BUT — Give him the stairway, give him the 
girl, and his — she's sure to be ! And in the Spring the young 
man's fancy turns to lacrosse, and he abandons former en- 
gagements to become a Man-killer. 



FRANK EDWARD ATKINS, JR. 

MERCHANTVILLE, N. J. 

Mechanical Engineering 

If Ed were only an Englishman, he would make an ex- 
cellent Tommy Atkins. But being a Yank, he qualifies 
for something higher up. We call him 'Aviation Ed." 
1 here was an audible sigh of relief issuing from anxious 
co-ed hearts when the news came that flying cadets were 
to be given an opportunity to return to college. There 
was another point of advantage, too. Presenting a color- 
ful relief among the predominance of common khaki ap- 
peared the smart attire of olive drab, with the cadet cap 
and gold braid. 





THOMAS HOWARD ATKINSON 

TRENTON, N. J. 

Electrical E.ngineering 

Here lies the profile of our dearly beloved friend and 
classmate "Steve," a good swimmer, lacrosse player, and 
soldier, an excellent student and bull-slinger. He was al- 
ways busy and generally cheerful; interested in many things, 
but chiefly in work. As an electrical engineer he should 
find plenty to do. A motorman's job always did involve 
considerable labor. 



I 

z 



76 



^-A-A 



r 
z 



HENRY HALLIWELL BITLER, JR. 

RUTLEDGE 

Chemical Engineering 

They pulled the Romulus and Remus stunt on me and 
Mister Ford when we were baptized, and the minister 
couldn't tell us apart. On the level, now, I am not Henry 
Bitler; I am Henry Ford. Mysterious coincidence, but it's 
a fact. I live out in Detroit; you don't see me around 
here. The guy you saw riding that home-made soap-box 
flivver about the boulevards of Swarthmore last spring was 
not me; that was the shade of me. I will grant that there 
exists only a shade of difference between the two of us, for 
we are both possessed of an uncanny inventive genius. 





JULIA THURSTON HOPE 

AKRON, O. 
Malhemaiics 

After lunch: "Oh dear, I hate this place! Nothing 
to do but vVork, work, all of the time! Now I'll have to 
go to the library and grind all afternoon." 

Ten minutes later: "Will you look! Marguerite Clark 
playing at the Arcadia! Lena, get that bag out of the 
left corner of the box in my second drawer and have that 
check cashed for me. Twelve minutes to make the 1 :29!" 
Though Julia does her grinding at the movies instead of at 
the library, she manages to fool the Math professors into 
giving her A's just the same. 



z 

n 



CHARLOTTE ANDREWS BUNTING 

SWARTHMORE 

Economics 
"If" 

If she doesn't mind the incongruity of "Bunny" for a nick- 
name. 

If she will generously take half the college home for a real 
meal, 

If she will incur the risk of skating on melting ice, when 
there's none better. 

If she is a feature of the hockey field in the fall and the 
tennis court in the spring, 

Ihen, you would call her a pretty good sport, wouldn't 
you? 




'^ ^ 



77 



HALCYON 





STEPHEN CLARENCE BUNTING 

LLANERCH 

Electrical Engineering 

NEWS THE PHOENIX FAILED TO PRINT 

BIG SONG HIT 

Bunting Achieves Success 

Stephen C. Bunting of the class of 1920 has just turned 
over to the pubhshers his new song hit, entitled "Good-Bye 
Haverford, Hello Girls. " Mr. Bunting chose this title 
after several days comparison with "Co-Educational Rag," 
as suggested by many of his friends. His sudden success 
has come as a surprise to all of us. 



n 



EDWIN MONROE BUSH 

LEBANON, IND. 
Mechanical Engineering 

Time, 7:30 Sunday evening. 

Place, The Phoenix Office. 

Ed bustles in: "Hello, Drew, here's the Penn game 
write-up. Sorry it's late, but I went into the Ledger office 
this morning to get that football cut. Then there was a 
special meeting of exec this afternoon, and after that Leon 
came over to discuss some Halcyon busmess, but before 
we finished the Penn manager called up to make some ar- 
rangements for the Track Meet — so I've been pretty bus> 
to-day." And so saying the big westerner lumbers out 
again. Big? Yes, in more ways than one. 




I 



c 



Z 





MARY ALEXANDER CAMPBELL 

hopkinsville, ky. 

Economics 

That term "the all-around girl" means little until it is 
used in connection with some one like this lively Ken- 
tuckian who, after amusing the College with her southern 
drawl, amazed us by trying her luck at everything from 
making super-masculine attacks upon a hockey ball, or 
learning an entire Soph Show part over night, to attaining 
an extraordinary degree of popularity, and being extremely 
successful in whatever she undertook. 

The "all-around girl" does not describe Mary, — she 
describes it. 



78 



^-A-^ 



JUNIORS 



LOUISE CARMAN 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

English 

A tall and slender maiden, she. 
Who comes from Washmgton, D. C. 
College papers are her line. 
And you'll surely find she'll shine 
When there's Phoenix work to do. 
She'll be a writer, 'fore she's through. 
With her fame through all the nation. 
If "The Unlucky Combination" 
Is a sample of her skill. 
Very soon she'll fill the bill. 
Her great ambition's to grow fat. 
To be an author after that. 



7 





HERSCHEL LEROY CLARK 

JAMESTOWN, IND. 

Mechanical Engineering 

"Hersch" started to college in a big university out 
West, but he finally decided he wanted an education after 
all, so he came East. But when he got here we found that 
he brought part of the West with him. That good sense 
of humor, that ready smile, or those long legs, — they are 
not Eastern. Their like is only raised in Indiana. 



LENA CAROLINE CLARK 

SOUTHWEST HARBOR, ME. 
Mathematics 
Of all the jolly Juniors 
Who enjoy a Freshman lark 
Up stairs and down stairs. 
There's none like Lena Clark. 

Of all the serious Seniors 
Who make us toe the mark. 
On Exec or off Exec, 
TTiere's none like Lena Clark. 

For she's a conscientious Yankee, 
But still you'll find a spark 
Of mischief, fun, and laughter. 
In the eyes of Lena Clark. 




^_l 



79 




DOROTHY DREW COFFIN 

INDIANOLA, IOWA 

Economics 

Here is the other half of the Siamese Twins. She walks 
when Sigler does, she talks when Sigler does, she sings when 
Sigler does, she dances when Sigler does, and even has 
dates when Sigler is chalked up for a soiree. 



I 



r 

z 



MARGUERITE COLES 

MOORESTOWN, N. J. 
Hislor]) 

Recovered from Temple University one perpetual "pep" 
machine belonging to Swarthmore College and Junior 
Class. This machine is the only one of its kind in exist- 
ence, for it has the power to pull Junior athletics out of any 
sort of a hole, whether it be hockey, gym, swimming, or 
track, and carry the class to a glorious victory. No other 
machine has been invented to drive away the "blues" as 
speedily as this one — bubbling over with animation and fun. 

Copyrighted by Class of I 920 and patented under name 
of "Peg Coles." 





-'* 



GEORGE CONAHEY, JR. 

PORT NORRIS, N. J. 
Civil Engineering 
George is one of those fellows whose "number" we never 
seem to get. When we see him peering benignly out at us 
through his glasses, his big, hulking frame ornamenting the 
Pet, our first assumption is that he's a man whose attention 
never wanders far from the straight and narrow path of 
study, and that his roughest pastime is watching the Passing 
Show in the front hall. But it is interesting to note that 
shy little George was a very valuable asset to the football 
team last fall, and, also that he's something of a swimmer. 
One may predict, that, provided he remains invulnerable 
to the female of the species, he will make good in propor- 
tion to his 208 pounds. 



80 



I 
z 

D 



EDNA MAY DAVIES 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

Did you ever stop and wonder 

Any time, — or think or ponder 

Very deeply, why you may have never known me? 

It's because I go to Philly 

Every week end, — willy-nilly; 

So now you know the deep, deep mystery. 





MARY NATALIE DONOVAN 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Mathematics 

I am quiet, but not shy. 

And I soar in Math — sky high. 

And the men I know are very numerous too. 

There's a dance? — well, I'll be there, 

And I'll tell you, on the square. 

That you'll very, very seldom find me blue. 



z 

D 



MARGUERITE PENDLETON DREW 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

Marguerite is a complete paradox. She gets straight 
A's, writes corking stories, solves the intricacies of the table 
system, earns her way through College, and yet declares 
that her greatest fault is intellectual laziness. When you 
think she is going to grind all evening, she will conjure up 
more wild escapades and make more racket than six small 
boys. She has positive ideas upon most subjects, but, upon 
the question of her future, she says she has no idea, — ex- 
cept that she has the wanderlust, and that is liable to lead 
anywhere. 




HALCYON 



^V^^^^l 


HH 




I^^^E^i^i^;:-^ 




^^^I^B-"' 




i' 



THOMAS LEGGETT EAGAN 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Mechanical Engineering 

When "Chick" came here from Cornell two years ago, 
he set out to meet some nice women, and he has been meet- 
ing them ever since. Last year we sized him up as a lazy 
man with a wonderful talent at bluffing, but when he re- 
turned to College last wmter after three months' service at 
Camp Grant as a second lieutenant, we were almost afraid 
of him. 

In relation to his other abilities. Prof. Mathews says 
"Chick" makes a better actor athlete than a mechanical en- 
gineer. However, when this Captain Jinks really settles 
down to work, he has to have an assistant to pour water on 
his slide rule to keep it cool. 



I 

z 



EDNA PRISCILLA EVANS 

MASONVILLE, N. J. 
English 
Do YOU WANT 

Encouragement 
Deportment 
Novelty 
Avoirdupois 

Get it at Ev.ans' 





FRANK WHITSON FETTER 

PRINCETON, N. J. 

Political Science 

"Tention! Rise. Outward face. Forward march." 
So speaketh our youthful mess sergeant with the puncture- 
proof smile. Frank, besides being a mighty good soldier, 
knows one or two things about the art of snaring the elusive 
A. It is rumored that, not content with these talents, he 
has ambitions for an athletic career. "Rest!" 



I 

z 

D 



82 



T 
i- 

n 
L 



ALFRED TENCH FRANCIS 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Mechanical Engineering 

You've heard that song about the "long boy" who good- 
byed maw, paw and the mule, but Tench has it all over 
that guy. He knew exactly what the war was about. 
Absolutely it was a war of brains, and until Tench could 
enlist his brains he was restless and conscious stricken. He 
joined our army here at college, and, being quick to learn, 
soon made the first squad. But Tench, with all his brains, 
admits having made one mistake m his short life, and that 
was the time he made a mistake in soaps and washed his 
hair in Gold Dust. 





Thii 



MARY LOVETT FRESCOLN 

SWARTHMORE 

History 

Talkative 
Energetic 
Amiable 
Studious 
ittle accrostic characterizes May to a "T". 



ARTHUR WILFRED GARDINER 

WEST CHESTER 
Civi7 Engineering 

It takes a lot of energy: 
■ To live in West Chester. 

To rise at 5:30 of a winter morn and catch that 6:40 
train. 

To rush a pigskin through a mob of Penn huskies. 

To maintain a "B" average. 

But "Art is Power." 




e ^ 



83 



HALCYON 





CLIFFORD RIGGS GILLAM 

LANGHORNE 

Mechanical Engineermg 

This modest young fellow named Gillam 

When it comes to "co-eds" can sure kill 'em, 

He raked in the dough 

For our famous Soph Show, 

And Lacrosse — just watch that boy spill 'em. 



I 



EUGENE NELSON GIRDWOOD 

MOYLAN 
Economics 

"Nellie" 
Not a girl, but always with one. 
Each of their cars I have managed to run and ruin. 
Lessons never started, but always finished. 
Last night a date, tonight a date, tomorrow night the same. 
Is it any wonder I am always late for my first class, 1 0:20? 
Everyone knows me by the color of my hair — or pants. 




a 



Z 



^ f2 








CHARLES WALDO HALDEMAN, JR. 

MALVERN 

Economics 

Have you $5 left from last month's pay? Then say 
good-bye to it if this budding McAdoo gets hold of you. 
He will either sell you a freshman bible that you don't 
want, relieve you of a dollar for a picture of the college, 
or sign you up as a member of the Y. M. C. A. But 
your loss is often I920's gam, for it is this same persistence 
that gets ads from hard headed business men, secures rock 
bottom rates for printing and binding, and extracts $2 bills 
from tight fisted alumni in exchange for this book. 



84 



GLADYS BOWER HAMMOND 

BOONTON, N. J. 
English 
"It's the principle of the thing." 
Whether you are friend or enemy, stranger or confidant, 
you will hear her slogan before you have been with Gladys 
two minutes. From an urgent request not to spill crumbs 
on the floor to her staunch belief in Platonic friendship, "it's 
the principle of the thing." From her aversion to a kiss, to 
the lieutenant's picture on her desk, "it's the principle of 
the thing." But the principle which Gladys practices most, 
and never mentions, is to keep a warm heart open to every- 
body. 




n 



r 




FRANCES HAUSE 

WEST CHESTER 

French 

She's a Rock of Gibraltar, — 
Frank, to a degree ; 
Missing not a single thing, — 
When there's anything to see. 

Up on all the gossip, — 
Knows every freshman's name; 
No matter where you meet her, 
Our Hausie's just the same. 



DORIS MARIA HAYS 

WEST CHESTER 

English 

Demure 

Obstinate 

Reserved 

Intellectual 

Sturdy 

Helpful 
Appreciative 
Youthful 
Sunny 



85 




HALCYON 





DONALD MOORE HEADINGS 

MC ALISTERVILLE 

"Say, wanta join our club?" 

"What's it like?" 

"Well, you see it's like this. Stony and Lukens and I 
cuss so much we gotta stop it. So we've organized a club 
and every time we swear we put a cent in the box. You 
don't cuss? Oh, d — it! Join anyway. It's a h — of a 
lot of fun. Gee, there goes two right there. That's the 
forty-eighth today. You'll join? Shake!" 

And thus speaking Baby Bright Eyes smiles and be- 
nignly saunters off in search of new victims. 



c 



I 

7 



PAUL MITCHELL HESS 

DALLASTOWN 

Electrical Engineering 

Painter, give this man a stubble-cut growth of blond 
hair, heightening the deep red of his blushing complexion; 
a certain brightness that shows itself as much in the 
twinkling eyes as in the smiling lips; and a fine pair of 
square shoulders that look well in khaki. Then, sir, when 
you have given him a Herbert Tarryton and a slant to his 
service hat, you have done all in your power. You cannot 
paint his accent, or make him say, "Are you going up 
town?" with the upward slide of a true Dutchman. Nor 
can your brush tell the world of his achievements. Leave 
that to 1920. They know him. 





JAMES MINSHALL HOLDEN 

CHESTER 

Civil Engineering 

My write-up? Now let me see. (Business of think- 
mg). I've been in camp for some time. In fact, I was 
training at Plattsburg for six weeks. I made out quite 
well. The trouble was, you know, the war stopped too 
soon. Another month or so, and I would have been a gen- 
eral at least. Everybody admits it — even myself. Am I 
glad to get back to cits? Oh, yes, but you know a uni- 
form helps a lot. A fellow isn't properly appreciated with- 
out it. By the way, have you read that new book, "C'est 
la Guerre," or "From Rookie to General in Sixty Days?" 
It's fine. 



86 



I 

7 



HELEN ETHEL HOWARTH 

PHILADELPHIA 

Mathematics 

She is a lover of nature, a lover of the trees, the birds, 
the stars, — especially the stars. Here is where she shines. 
Her home is in the observatory. She lives there, except 
when sleeping, or talking to her friends, or making cocoa, or 
studying in the woods. She is deeper than most girls — oh, 
several thousand feet deeper, and there is nothing that her 
friends like better than to have a heart to heart talk with 
her. 





ISABEL SUTTON JACOBS 

PHILADELPHIA 

Public Speaking 

What have we here? Why, this is Issy, 
She's always funny, always busy. 
Of all the crowd she's got the rep 
Of having just the mostest pep. 
She's not a stude, but yet, by heck. 
Her chief delight is spouting dec. 
In leading things she's got the push. 
In Phoenix work she's good as Bush. 



I 

z 

D 



HOWARD MALCOLM JENKINS 

SWARTHMORE 
Electrical Engineering 

'Where is the normal man?" the world doth cry. 

'Where is a man not of the Dickens type. 
No freak ; with body strong, a swimmer fine, 
A noble, broad, and scientific mind. 
An unassuming, conscientious soul. 
To co-eds' taste too bashful, yea too cold?" 
Let Swarthmore make reply, " 'Tis Jenks." 




87 



:a--A-^^ 



HALCYON 





r 

7 



ELIZABETH CATHERINE JONES 

EBENSBURG 
Biology 
"Say, people, do you know where my wife is? 



r 



been up in 'lab' all afternoon and I can't find her. People, 
I'm sorry, but since I'm proctor I will have to tell you not 
to make so much noise. I for one have to study because 
I'm going to the tea-room for dinner. I wish you would 
be quiet, but still if you want to start a rough-house on 
Second West I'll help you." 



ELIZABETH GEST JONES 

POTTSTOWN 

English 

This heroine is Betty G., 
She is the twin of Betty C, 
And so, to aggravate confusion. 
They're wives, completing the illusion. 
And when they're called upon the 'phones. 
We curse the name of Betty Jones. 




I 

z 

r 




PRESTON HENRY JUDD 

ELKLAND 

Latin 

He plays the organ in the church. 

For him the Sunday Schools all search. 

A genius with the drawing pencil. 

And paints with brushes and with stencil 

Just look at our old Soph Show scenery. 

Combined interiors, ships, and greenery. 

What will he be? Gaze at his tie, 

A polka-dotted butterfly. 

And you will know, if you're a guesser. 

That he will be a Greek professor. 



88 



^-^-^ 



r 

7 



ELEANOR MARY JUDGE 

MANSFIELD 
French 
Don't misjudge me! ! — 

My heart has not been mobilized, — just because I wear 
two silver bars. 

I am not a shirker, — just because I refuse to do War 
Aims. 

I am not without dignity, — just because I talk baby talk. 
Yours, with punch, "Judy." 




r 



\ 



^A 




DAVID STREEPER KLAUDER 

PHILADELPHIA 

Chemical Engineering 

They called him "a dashing young heutenant." Is he 
dashing? Witness his century sprints on the cinder path. 
Is he young? Well, hardly, considering his mature manage- 
ment of Soph Show scenery, and the Phoenix. Is he a 
lieutenant? Well, we caught a glimpse of the bars and 
leather puts one day, but the very next he had donned 
"cits" and returned to lab and lecture. 



GEORGE BROWN LEEDER 

UPLAND 
Chemistr]) 

George rides the trolleys from Chester to Swarthmore 
daily, and should be an authority on local transportation. 
He knows each individual P. R. T. car by sound, and can 
tell you the number of square wheels on each. 

George is one of that rare type called pluggers. He 
plods along his quiet way, and, though he is no speed king, 
he always gets what he goes after. While his name has 
never broken into big headlines, he has lately been much 
before the public eye, snapping the pictures which beautify 
the pages of this mighty Halcyon. 




I 

z 

D 



V-^-^ 



HALCYON 




LUCY LIPPINCOTT 

RIVERTON, N. J. 
Economics 
Lucy is famous for: 1 — Her rep as a good sport, 2 — 
her delightful dancing, 3 — her gymnastic gyrations, 4 — her 
sovereign swing of the hockey stick, 5 — (emphatically) 
her reputed relatives. So much the last, that we may 
parody "Smiles" : 

There are relatives who come to see us. 

There are relatives we go to see ; 

There are relatives of all conditions, 

Those we like, and those we'd like to flee. 

But when some bewail their "sad" relations. 

She never has to fear on any score ; 

Hers are all the nicest of creations. 

For they all come to old Swarthmore. 



r 
z 

D 



MARTHA GERTRUDE McCABE 

SELBYVILLE, DEL. 

English 

Trudie has a way — 
No pouring over books all day, yet marks that are the 

envy of her friends ; 
No noisy rough-housing, but always ready for a laugh ; 
No wasted time before the glass, but always neat and trim; 
No loud arguing, but diplomacy that wins us all. 




|.v«i^v^i^G«Y^-:^ 




LETITIA TYLER McNEEL 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

English 

"Hello, Tish, got your dec. done?" "My deah, I 
haven't done a thing foah today. I just know I'll get 
stuck — 'Oh God of battles' — that's all I can say, and then 
I always laugh. But I love Shakespeah, don't you? Don't 
you want to go in town with me tomorrow night to heah 
Galli-Curci? Aunt Priscilla says she's perfectly precious 
and her voice is simply lovely. Oh, deah, there goes the 
bell and I haven't done my dec. But I don't care, I'd so 
much rathah talk to you. I like you so much." 



z 



90 



I 
z 

n 

u 



HELEN VOGDES MACARTNEY 

PHILADELPHIA 

Latin 

Helen makes friends that to most of 
acquaintances. They are her studies. She 
go to the very heart of Greece and Rome, 
friends stray, lone members of the faculty with anonymous 
bunches of flowers and other kindnesses. But she is afraid 
of athletics, and trembles at sight of the swimming pool. 
She never frolics like a giddy D. A. S. or G. I. K., but 
she has certainly caught the spark of learning's fire. 



us are mere 
takes time to 
She also be- 





HELEN MOORE MARTIN 

WEST CHESTER 

English 

Helen comes all the way from West Chester, bright and 
early every morning. But coat and hat, a ton of books, 
and a windy day never ruffle her. Take a look at her in 
an eight o'clock class. Every hair is in place, the clean 
white pekay collar is creaseless and spotless, and from the 
serene expression on her face you would think she was a 
lady of leisure rather than a hard-working, train-traveling, 
book-burdened college girl. 



SARA JANE MAYHEW 

BRIDGETON, N. J. 

His lory 

When at college Sara landed. 
She was all a Soph demanded. 
Wore her hair a-hanging, so. 
With a great big ribbon bow. 
Found the men so queer and strange. 
But oh, oh, oh, how times do change. 
Now she likes to dance and dress. 
She has style, you must confess. 
A secret I will tell you then. 
Shush! She doesn't hate the men. 




91 



^ -A- Jh. 



HALCYON 




ETHEL GIBBONS MEANS 

SWARTHMORE 

Cerman 

A pink and white blond who has attained the height of 
5 feet 1 inches has outgrown the conventional character- 
istics which we usually attribute to that species. In physi- 
cally reaching a greater elevation, she attains a greater ele- 
vation of thought. In Chautauqua, rather than in a Sum- 
mer hotel, she realizes the joy of a vacation. 



IDA ELIZABETH MEIGS 

PHILADELPHIA 
Economics 

Prexy once said: "Make a lot of your opportunities 
in college." 

Ida did. She made: 

A lot of noise. 

A lot of excuses for undone work. 

A lot of trips to the tea-room. 

A lot of fussing in the halls. 

A lot of friends. 




I 

z 

D 



7 




CHARLOTTE EMMA MOORE 

COATESVILLE 

Mathemai'.cs 

If you are in a dilemma. 

Then go to Charlotte Emma, 

On her judgment you're sure you can depend. 

If you are on the run. 

With twenty jobs undone. 

She'll help you with the work, and be your friend. 



92 



I 
z 

D 



MARY NAGLE 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

Mary is a magnet for attracting general information. 
She robs the papers of their most obscure news items; she 
catches the echoes of Parrish halls; she has an almost spir- 
itualistic faculty of learning the gossip of the outside world; 
she is sure to be one of the most reliable and most recent 
sources of information. 





CHARLES NEFF 

PHILADELPHIA 

Civil Engineering 

Is he a warrior? No not he. 
Is he a farmer? Well hardly. 
Is he a sailor? Not at all. 
Is he a preacher? Not by cal 
Is he a dancer? More or less. 
Is he a fusser? Well I guess. 



1 ' !,'" ' " ~;" kk 



EMILY LUCILE NOBLE 

COLLINGSWOOD, N. J. 
Latin 

Lucile's art talents have been crowded into the back- 
ground by Y. W. C. A., Red Cross, and Somerville 
library duties. We are inclined to blame the College for 
letting such talents lie dormant, but Lucile is very tolerant 
of the College. She never criticizes others. No wonder 
she found Room Inspector such a disagreeable job and 
made her tours of investigation in the twilight hours, when 
she could overlook the dust. 

Editor's Note: If you think Lucile's "art talents lie 
dormant," take a look at the 1920 HALCYON. 



z 

D 




93 




MARY ELIZABETH OEHRLE 

PHILADELPHIA 

French 

Now Betty is a good sport. 
We like her — so would you. 
She'd help you with your lessons. 
And do Y. W. work, too. 

She's mostly always happy. 

She's jolly as can be. 

We're glad she came to Swarthmore 

To be our friend — you see. 



HORACE BRANSON PASSMORE 

OXFORD 
Chemistrv 



r 

7 



Harmony 
On 

Reserve 
Aspirations 
Cashier or 
Engineer 



Prophets 

Agree 

Some 

Sweet day he'll 

Manage an 

Orchestra and a 

Reserve bank 

Each excellently 




I 

7 
U 





MARY DOROTHY PAXSON 

PARKESBURG 
Latin 

"Oh, kiddo, I forgot to put up my exercise slip. Ellen 
just reminded me! What will I do. Bee? Now, you 
know I c-an't make up twelve hours work next week, now 
can I? I just don't think Miss Culin ought to expect us 
to take exercise, anyway." 

This is Dotty — dainty, adorable, indignant Dotty. 



94 




7 



LEON MORRIS PEARSON 

SWARTHMORE 

English 

The strangest thing has happened; Mr. Arliss, of the stage. 
Is studying more acting at this rather advanced age. 
Prexy Swain now haunts Hbraries, Bryan now is growing 

poor, 
For he's quit his oratory, being but an amateur. 
The Public Ledger Editor gave notice yesterday. 
And Paul M. Pearson's going to take wings and fly away. 
For a youth with wavy forelock, deep blue eyes and mighty 

brow 
Has beat them at their jobs and they are all discouraged 

now. 





GLADYS SEAMAN PELL 

SADDLE RIVER, N. J. 

Economies 

Gladys would be at home as mistress of the White 
House, as forewoman of a shirtwaist factory, or as prin- 
cipal of an ultra-fashionable boarding school. She would 
assume any of these responsibilities with dignity, and ac- 
complish the desired result just as satisfactorily and effi- 
ciently as she has done with the affairs which 1920 has put 
ill her charge. 



I 

z 

D 



LUCIE MARIE PENROSE 

PHILADELPHIA 

Political Science 

Daintily tripping 

And lightly skipping 

On a tiny slippered toe; 

Always so airy. 

Wise as a fairy. 

Oh, she'll never let you know, — 

Though you may wonder, 

Worry and ponder, — 

How many times she's said "No!' 




^ ^ e ^ Q 



95 



-A- -A 




I 

7 
D 



HELEN ALEXANDER RAMSEY 

SV.'ARTHMORE 
French 

A radiant smile and a flash of white teeth — behold 
"Ramsey." She makes you think of sunny weather when 
a gale is blowing. Perhaps it is because she enjoys the out- 
of-doors so much. 

In one respect in particular she has the advantage of the 
rest of us. Most of us have a debt or two we would like 
to be rid of, but she has a "Det" to be proud of. 



HARRIET HALE RENSHAW 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

I wish I were a Red Cross nurse 

Away across the sea. 

Or a governess, or an English prof 

In a university. 

In fact, there's nothing I wouldn't do 

To get my heart's desire ; — 

To go to France and learn to speak 

So a Frenchman could admire. 





GREGG DAVID REYNOLDS 

WEST CHESTER 

Chemislr]^ 

Yes, it was in the fall of nineteen eighteen. I had the 
Winton, and we got a crowd to go up to Unionville to a 
country dance. There were four of us on the front seat. 
When we got there, there wasn't any music, so I left the 
bunch there and went to West Chester and brought some 
musicians back. We danced till two, and then on the way 
back I went to sleep at the wheel and we nearly crashed 
through a fence. We're going again next week. 



z 



96 



r 
z 

D 



ELIZABETH HOPE RICHARDSON 

PHILADELPHIA 

Political Science 
You say you have searched everywhere? 
Cabinet meeting, and isn't she there? 
You've looked in the gym? 
She's not "fussing" with him? 
Weil, it seems you are on to the dope! 

Have you tried in the chemistry lab? 

On the 'phone booth you'd better keep tab. 

There's no Red Cross today? 

Yes, what's that you say? 

Oh sure, "where there's lunch, there is Hope. 





z 



FLORENCE DUNLAP RICHMOND 

PHILADELPHIA 

HisioVT] 

Although it is a well known fact that only one thing at 
a time can be done well, Florence defies this principle. She 
crochets while she studies. Her practical ability points to 
a future as a business woman, when she will probably fill 
in her spare time with whatever form of handiwork is then 
in vogue. 



MARY THOMAS ROBERTS 

MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

English 

Who goes out for every class team, and makes it, too? 
Who is champion in tennis doubles? Who was the only 
girl on the Soph debating team? Why, Mary, but she is 
very modest. Maybe you don't know it, but Mary is also 
a poet. Some time ago a poem came out in the Phoenix 
signed "Our Poet Laureate." Everybody wondered who 
did it. Finally Mary admitted that she was guilty, as she 
put it. Mary is being found out, even if she doesn't ad- 
vertise. 




07 



HAT.CYON 




r 
z 

D 



^■J!" 





RUTH PRATT RODENBOH 

WEST CHESTER 

English 

There is something about Ruth, — perhaps it is her smile, 
— that brings all kinds of delightful thoughts into your 
mind: blue sky and open spaces, the smell of new mown 
hay, long tramps over the hills, and an open fire and apple 
dumplings waiting at home ! And that is a mighty pleas- 
ant picture to call up within the classic and cloistered con- 
fines of our Alma Mater. 



ELEANOR YORKE SHARTEL 

NEOSHO, MO. 

History 

Experience at the Universities of Michigan and Missouri 
has shown Eleanor how to get more A's, mail, food, trips 
to town, invitations to dances and SLEEP than anyone else 
in the class. With a sigh of relief she will put "1 he New 
Republic" on the shelf, hang a stray coat in the closet, and 
getting out some tissue paper, calmly begin to clean her ring. 

"My dear, I had the most successful time m town to- 
day — didn't get lost once. I have a new system; when- 
ever I finish an errand I go back to Broad Street station 
and start again." 




I 

z 

D 




HELEN ELIZABETH SIGLER 

INDIANOLA, IOWA 

Biologv 

We see her often with Dotty Coffin, 
Two figures slim and slight. 

From loway they've come to stay 
We say they did just right. 

With fingers sharp she plays the harp. 
Which fills her hearers with delight. 

With eyes so bright, and figure light, 
She dances on through all the night. 



r 



HENRIETTA ALBERT SMITH 

SWARTHMORE 
English 
What is that flash upon the landscape, that riot of color 
that rushes up the asphaltum? There is black and white 
striping that puts Michael's gates to shame, there is a burst 
of orange underneath the straw-colored coat, and perhaps 
a glimpse of deep pink sweater can be seen beneath. But 
there is a more serious side to the picture. The arms of this 
colorful creation are loaded down with sombre books, — 
thick, solemn, worn-out books, — and if you will peep un- 
der the smart velvet hat you will see the same face that 
looked out from the stiff black garb of Mrs. Stonington 
in the Sophomore Show. 





CORNELIA MILLER STABLER 

SWARTHMORE 

Public Speaking 

Step this way, ladies and gentlemen! No pushing, 
there ! Positively last appearance of Miss Cornelia Stabler 
in her famous operetta, "Fritz," world famous prima 
donna ! No madam, no seats under five dollars. Starred 
first in Captain Jmks! Later famous on Bill Bryan's 
Chautauqua circuit ! All reporters use side door ! Posi- 
tively last appearance in this role: Sails tomorrow for 
France, by airplane! Wait your turn. Mister! Here, 
boy, take those flowers to the stage entrance! Step lively, 
please ! ! I 



HAROLD THEODORE STUBBS 

OXFORD 

Biology 

When we think of "stubbs" we usually think of theater 
tickets, pens, or even cigars, but here we have something 
entirely different. He came here along with the rest of us 
and has made himself conspicuous ever since by keeping 
out of things. However, he fooled us all one time when 
he went to a masquerade college dance camouflaged as a 
blushing maiden and being led by the arm of a would-be 
ruffian, Preston Judd. GooD NIGHT. 




r 

7 
D 




JOHN FRANKLIN STYER 

CONCORDVILLE 
Chemistry 

John didn't have to put on khaki like the rest of us to 
take part in the war; and yet he did more shooting than 
the whole of Unit Number 332 combined. He performed 
his duties like a plain-clothes man, often working unawares. 
The casualty list attributable to J. F. S. is contained be- 
tween the covers of this publication. His instrument of 
torture is a small black box, which is exploded by pressure 
upon a rubber bulb. 

"Chin up a bit. Dr. Swain; now look pleasant, please. " 



Q 



ELLEN ZEITLER SWARTZ 

PUNXSUTAWNEY 
Latin 

Well, girls, may I come in and piece with you a bit? 
Piece — yes — what's so funny about that? We always 
"go piecing" in Punxsutawney. My crackers were all — 
so I thought I'd come in and get some of yours. Yes, I 
am feeling pretty tired, I had classes all morning, and this 
afternoon it was my turn to bring the Phoenix down from 
Wallingford and help with the mailing list ; then we had 
exec meeting to-night, and after that I did some typewrit- 
ing for Dr. Ellis. 

Well, I guess I'd better go to bed along. Good-night. 




■d 



u 




MARY ELIZABETH TYLER 

PHILADELPHIA 

Mathematics 

She's always in a hurry. 
She's always in a flurry. 
She's as busy as a little bumble bee. 
At her math she's mighty clever. 
And at Phoenix work she never 
Fails to do her level best you'll a 
Yet besides her work each day. 
She finds time for fun and play. 
And we're all glad that we know her. 
Yea Mary! 



agree. 



100 



^-A--^ 



JUNIORS 



CHARLES WEYMAN WASSMAN, JR. 

BELLAIRE, OHIO 
Biologv 

"The only thing that I got against this dog-gone army 
is that they don't give a man a chance to sleep. Guess I 
foxed them Sunday when I never got up for reveille. 
That's a stiff chem e.xam tomorrow, but I'm so sleepy I 
just can't keep my eyes open. Hey! Place, be darned sure 
you wake me up when the sentry comes around." 

But there is one time when Charlie doesn't need any- 
one to wake him up. That's Saturday afternoon when he 
Vv-aves the big megaphone and leads the stands in a rous- 
ing cheer that starts the Garnet team off to another victory. 




I 

z 




BEATRICE WHITESIDE 

PHILADELPHIA 

French 

We like her because she's witty. 
We like her because she's bright. 
We like her because she's pretty. 
And always looks just right. 
She's always ready for dancing. 
She's always there with a smile. 
She's a mighty popular lady 
Of a really charming style. 



ANNE SHOURDS WILLIAMS 

BRIDGETON, N. J. 

History 

She came from the mosquito state, 
And made the name of Bridgeton great. 
They say her favorite game is hockey. 
Her favorite uniform is khaki. 
Her favorite wife is Sarah Mayhew, 
And over her she makes much to-do. 



z 

D 




101 



r 
z 




MILDRED ESTELLE WILLIARD 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

Merry, fair and jolly. 
Interesting and bright, 
Loveable and happy. 
Downright little sprite. 
Radiant and pretty. 
Entertaining, gay and witty. 
Dancing every night. 



RALPH ERDMAN WILSON 

LEESBURG, N. J. 

Chemistry 

This is another one of the boys who have made Mill- 
ville famous. When Erd first came here he loyally up- 
held the reputation of his fellow townsmen by his hard 
work and opposition to fussing. In the first respect he is 
still true to tradition, but in the second — well, the folks 
down in Jersey would never know him now. College 
dances and twilight walks are a regular part of his sched- 
ule, and it is a lean week for the tea room when Erd 
doesn't get there. 

Kwinkle, Kwinkle, little star ! 





CLARENCE HOWARD YODER 

KUTZTOWN 

Political Science 

"Dutch" is the quiet sort of a chap whose entrance into 
college was unheralded and unsung ; who did not spring 
suddenly into the limelight of publicity and the height of 
popularity, but who grew steadily into the friendship of his 
fellows and into a big place in student life. He isn't very 
large and his voice isn't any larger, but on the basketball 
floor he gives ample expression to the ability concealed be- 
neath his quiet exterior. The same cool head and clear 
brain which have made him a basketball captain have also 
made him a leader in class and college activities. 



z 




102 



TEx-^tlembars of 1920 



J 
I 

z 

D 



*WiLLiAM Blaine Albright 
Marion Anderson 
John Patton Arnold, * 2 k 
Ruth Pennock Barnard 



Catherine Guss, $ 2 * 
Marion Leslie Hoag 
Frank Hazen Holman, Jr. 
Herbert E. Jefferson, $ a © 



Holstein DeHaven Clean'er, $ 5 K Francis Arthur Jenkins, a y 
Grace Lorraine Conner Dorothy Morris, a © n 

Marvin H. Coombs Anna Margueretta Rapp, a r 

Helen Dorothy Conrad Norris Jonathan Reynolds, K 2 

^Walter Carroll Dickinson, * K * Florence Alston Rogers 
Elizabeth Agnes Fisher, a r Grace Rosenburg 

fEsTHER Baldwin Garrett Mae Draper Shallcross, k K r 

Charlotte May Goette, k k r Joseph Sheppard Sickler, k 2 

David Davis Griscom Theodore R. Thompson, * k * 

Virginia Elizabeth Wilcox 



*Returned to college. 
tDeceased. 



Former Members of the Class of 1920 who are or have been in the Service 
are mentioned in the Swarthmore War Record. 



I 

z 



103 



^4h--4 



HALCYON 



I 

z 

D 




I 

Z 

D 



104 



V-A--^ 



SOPHOMORES 




50PnOMORL 




L. 

n 



CLA55 orric£R5 

FIRST 5LME5TLK 5LC0N1) SEMtSTEK 

Alon C.V,xU.t,„. >I\E5IDENT W,ii,.„ H stow.j. 

w,ii,»„ P K.mp VICE PRESIDENT w,ii,.„, ^ Cru, 

Janet C Y..-.n, SECKEfAPsY h...XU^ A K.n.U, 

W,ll,.n>t C.rUr TKEA5URER Ct,„U= S Ma» 




I 
z 



^ ^ e ^ 



305 



HALCYON 



I 



D 



mmt 





o 



L 



L 



I 



E 





z 



106 



I 



D 



:^ember5 of tl^e (Tlass of 1921 



Swarthmore 

Philadelphia 

Rosemont 

West Chester 

Northbrook 



Eric Ainsworth, SSK 

William Blaine Albright 

Doris Aylmer Arthur, Mathematics - - - - 

Elizabeth Middleton Atherholt, K K r. Chemistry - 

Miriam Edith Baily, n b $, French . . . - 

Grace Agnes Ballinger, a r. Political Science E. Walnut Lane, Germantown 

Elizabeth FredrikKE Earth, English - 6151 Columbia Ave., Philadelphia 

Edward Evans Bartleson, $ 2 K, Mechanical Engineering - - Chester 

Anna Jemima Beatty, n B $, Latin Chester 

Grant Emerson Benjamin, * K *, Engineering - - - Philadelphia 

Dorothy Sellers Blackburn, English - - - - - Lock Haven 

James Furnas Bogardus, K S, Political Science - - - Swarthmore 

Dorothy Beach Boring, English . . - - - Ashbourne 

Alexander Lupold Bressler, * a 0, Mech. Engin., 4825 Walton Ave., Phila. 



Grace Brinton, n b $, English 

Boyd Janney Brown, $ k *, Chemistr]) 

Mildred Runkle Burke 

George Leslie Burnett, Engineering - 

Eleanor Albina Butler, a n, English 

William Porter Carter, k 2 - 

George Whitman Casey, Jr., Mathematics 

Paul William Chandler, * K *, Economics 

James Dawson Clancey, K 2, Chemistry - 

Janet Clark, a r. Biology - - - - 

Alfred Christensen, a y - 

LoRNA Beatrice Christie, a r, English 

Virginia Laws Coleman, French 

Charles Benjamin Coles, ay, Chemistry - 

Charlesanna Benajah Coles, Chemistry 

Leon Howard Collins, ■!> k *, Biology 

Richard Arment Darlington, * a 0, Chemistry 

David Mathias Dennison, Mathematics 

Marion Estelle Deputy, English - 

Clara KneRR Dewees, Mathematics 



Christiana 

622 29th St., Washington, D. C. 

1528 Green St., Harrisburg 

3025 Dauphin St., Philadelphia 

Narberth 

Philadelphia 

Swarthmore 

Kennett Square 

- Merchantville, N. J. 

Media 

Philadelphia 

- New Brunswick, N. J. 

Swarthmore 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Merchantville, N. J. 

Chadds Ford Junction 

Swarthmore 

Glenolden 

Birchrunville 



z 



107 



I 

7 



Walter Carroll Dickinson, * K *, Engineering - - Montclaire, N. J. 
Katherine Eliza Donnelly, n B ^, Mathematics, 634 W. State St., Trenton, N. J. 
Mary Dotterer, * 2 <J>, Latin ------- Wayne 

John Woolman Dudley, $ 2 K, Ch^m. Eng., 124 Adams St., Washington, D. C. 



Masonville, N. J. 

Preston Hollow, N. J. 

4641 Penn St., Frankford 

Norwood 

Tampa, Fla. 

- Chester 

- Fox Chase 

Lansdowne 

Salem, N. J. 

53 Halstead St., East Orange, N. J. 

1541 N. 29th St., Philadelphia 

West Chester 

2217 Providence Ave., Chester 

829 Corinthian Ave., Philadelphia 

Swarthmore 



Hannah Tomlinson Eavenson, Biology 
Wayland Hoyt ElsbREE, $ A O, Political Science 
Margaret Wilson Embery, $ 2 <J, Economics 
Carroll Patterson Ford, $ 2 K, Civil Engineering 
Mary Gladys Gegg, Latin - - - - - 

Elizabeth Blakely Graham, n b *, French - 

Eleanor Wickersham Green, $ 2 <l>. Biology 

Harriette Louise Greiner, IT B * - 

Helen Lydia Griscom, k K r. Biology 

Norman Bird Grobert, * 2 K, Chemistry 

Emily Elizabeth Hallauer 

Dorothy McClellan Hammond, English 

William Minton Harvey, a Y, Chemistry 

Hildegarde Marie Hexamer, a r. History 

Barbara Forrester Hickling, Engl'sb 

John Maddux Hilgert, $ 2 K, Chemical Engineering - - Boothwyn 

Ella Roberts Hoyt, French - - 415 Chambers Ave., Camden, N. J. 

William Ronald Huey, a y. Chemistry - - - - Kennett Square 

Mary Clothier Hull, k a 0, French ----- Swarthmore 

George Bement Jackson, a Y, Civil Engineering, 55 Pineapple St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miriam Atkinson Jenkins, K a 0, French - - - - Swarthmore 

Edwin Morris Joseph - - - - 1874 E. 93rd St., Cleveland, Ohio 

Robert Swift Joyce, a Y, Mechanical Engineering - - Swarthmore 

Ethel Johanna Kaplan, $2*, Public Speaking, 233 Queen Lane, Germantown 
Gabriel Louis Kaplan, Chem'siry - 433 N. Grove St., East Orange, N. J. 
Howard Bleasdale Katzenbach, K 2, Engineering, 617 Ridge Ave, Roxborough 
Edith Eleanor Keene, History ------ Lansdowne 

William Powell Kemp, $ k *, Economics - . - - Easton, Md. 
Dorothy Armstrong Kinsley, n b $ - 725 N. 63rd St., Philadelphia 

Marjorie Estelle Kistler, K K r, Biology - - - - Wilkes-Barre 

John William Klopp, Biology - Philadelphia 

Elizabeth Knabe, Chemistry - - - - 2031 N. 20th St., Philadelphia 



I 

z 



108 



^-A-^. 



SOPHOMORES 



I 

z 

D 



Helen Cooper Knight, at, French - - 3813 Walnut St., Philadelphia 
George Henry Kolb, K 2, English - - 1 319 Ruscombe St., Philadelphia 

Sarah Elizabeth Kreemer, French ----- West Chester 
Harry Hartman Landis, Jr., K 2, Electrical Engineering - East Petersburg 

Harry William Lang, <I> 2 K, Mechanical Engineering - - - Rutledge 
Charles Plummer Larkin, Jr., * 2 K, Economics, 702 Highland Ave., Chester 
Charles Wildey Lukens, <3? 2 K, Mechanical Engineering - - Moore 

Townsend Sherman McAllister, a Y, Electrical Engineering Denver, Colo. 
Morrison Cushman McKinley, $ a ©, Chemistr]) 1619 Green St., Philadelphia 
Frank Krick Machemer, K 2, Civil Engineering - - - Royersford 

Raymond Edward Macksey, Chem. Eng. 47 S. Clinton St., East Orange, N. J. 
Albert Coward Mammel, <!> a 0, Civi7 Engineering - - - North Wales 
Frank Henry Marks, Chemistry - - 1 002 Fairmont St., Washington, D. C. 
Charles Singleton Mears, K 2, Engineering 6701 Ridge Road, Roxborough 
Frances Katherine Miller, n B $ - - - - - Philadelphia 

Grace Edna Moore, English - - - 3529 N. Broad St., Philadelphia 

Donald Swain Morgan, $ K *, Engineering - - Knightstown, Indiana 

William Staunton Moylan, $ 2 K, Mechan'cal Engineering - Swarthmore 

Paul W. Neuenschv.'ANDER, $ K >I', Mechanical Engineering Sistersville, W. Va. 
Mabel Gladys Newton, English - - - Lake Ronkonkoma, N. Y. 



Virginia Morse Packard, $ 2 $, English 

Paula Pagelow, English ----- 

Eleanor Mary Paxson, Biology - - . - 

Caroline Philips, k a 0, French 

George William Place, k 2, Chemical Engineering - 

George Alfred Powell, K 2, Mechanical Engineering 

Joseph Janvier Pugh, k 2, Maihemaiies - - - 

Frances Louise Purdy, Mathematics - 

Lucy Ayres Rainier, $ 2 * French 

Catherine Ott Rhoads, History 

Rebecca Rose - - - - - 

Frances Virginia Runk, K K r. Economics 

Helen Ethel Samuel, English - . - - 

Dorothy Elizabeth Saylor - . - .. 

Rachael Mae Sheetz, n B *, English 

Helen Shoemaker, Civil Engineering - - - 



Atlantic City, N. J. 

Media 

Swarthmore 

Swarthmore 

Swarthmore 

Glen Head, N. Y. 

Lansdowne 

Fort Howard, Md. 

Cedarville, N. J. 

Lansdowne 

Brookhaven, Chester 

- Philipsburg 

- Morton 

- Pottstown 

Hagerstown, Md. 

- Lansdowne 



109 



--A-^. 



HALCYON 



r 

7 




I 
z 

D 



^ 



110 



SOPHOMORES 



Clarence Albert Short, Chemical Engineering - - - West Chester 

Charlotte Price Speakman, k k r, English, 33 Gramatan Ave., Mt. Vemon, N. Y. 



I 

7 

D 



Marie Julia Stettler, Latin 

Henrietta Floyd Stewart, n b *, English 

Mildred Carmany Stout, a r. Mathematics 

William Hinchman Stow, Jr., k S, Economics 

Claire Kathleen Strawn, Mathematics 

Evelyn Martha Strawn, Mathematics 

loNA Genevieve Sutch, * S $, French - 

Dan'id Dewey Sutton, k 5, Mechanical Engineering 

Thelma Marguerite Taylor, History 

Eric Beresford Townsend, Chemistry 

Josephine Elizabeth Tyson, Latin 

Alan Chester Valentine, * k * - 

Marjorie Francis Virden, French 

Nellie Lee Walker, k a © - 

James Edward Waples, Chemical Engineering 

Charlotte Graves Washburn, $ 5 *, French 

Ruth Mekeel Washburn, k a ® 

Virginia Way, k k r. Mathematics - - - - 

Samuel Bentley Webb, $ K *, Electrical Engineering 

Eleanor Rose Weber, k K r. Biology - 

Lee Weiss, English ...... 

George Malcolm West, $ a ©, Mechanical Engineering 
Emilie Hinds White, n B $, Mathematics - 
Russell White, K 2, Engineering - -- - 

Evelyn Engel Wich, 4^ S *, Biology - 

Josephine Wildman, k a ® 

Grace Taylor Wilson, n B * - 

Lydia Lois Withers, French ----- 

Aline Mathieson Woodrow, Latin - . . . 

Ruth Harriet Woodward, Biology 

BeRNICE Wright, Political Science 

Janet Graham Young, K K r, French - 6800 Lincoln Drive, Germantown 

William Carleton Young, Mechanical Engineering - - - Atglen 

Josephine Dean Zartman, Engineering ----- Philadelphia 



Slatington 

Wilkinsburg 

5719 Ridge Ave., Roxborough 

624 State St., Camden, N. J. 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

362 Duval St., Philadelphia 

Sistersville, W. Va. 

Jenkintown 

Baltimore, Md. 

Philadelphia 

- Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Lewes, Del. 

Norristown 

Hammontown, N. J. 

- Chevy Chase, D. C. 

Chappaqua, N. Y. 

- Glen Cove, N. Y. 
West Chester 

Norristown 

Newton Falls, Ohio 

Sayre 

- Plainfleld, N. J. 

Philadelphia 

Wilkes-Barre 

Langhorne 

Lansdowne 

Elizabethtown 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Mendenhall 

Williamson School 



I 

z 

D 



111 



"Ex -Members of 1921 



I 

Z 
D 



Edith Albertson, a r 

David R. Bamberger 

Julian Wilson Barnard 

Marion Gardener Bedell 

Mann Gluck Berg 

Harry Nickles Boureau, a y 

Philip Haviland Burn 

Marjorie Reeves Campbell 

Richard Dodge Campbell, k 2 

Helen L. Caughey 

CoATES Coleman, Jr. 

Henry Fred Colvin 

Margaret V. Coolbaugh, * 2 * 

Delma G. p. Crenshaw 

Helen Mae Davenport 

Joseph Miller Davenport, $ a ® 

Frank Fitts, a y 

Avery Draper Harrington 

Myrton Ruth Haviland 

Frank Ralston Heavener, a y 

Jesse Herman Holmes 

Amy Vivien Hunter 

Walter Russell James 

Elizabeth Bopp Klemm, a n 

Dorothy Patterson Koller, $ 2 <E> 

Erna Charlotte Kreamer, k K r 

Helen Ruth Leblang 



Alice Geraldine Lippincott, It B $ 

Ruth Cromwell McClung 

Juliet Canby Mace, k a 

Alice Louise Morgan, * 2 * 

Katherine Palm 

Virginia Pentz 

William Powall 

Angus Marshall Reynolds 

Margaret E. Richter 

Helen Mae Rogers 

Henry Swartley Ruth, $ 2 K 

Adele Lyzette Siemans 

Ellis Leeds Spackman, Jr., * k * 

Wallace Naylor Spring, k 2 

Dorothy Sproat 

Mary Stannard, * 2 * 

Elizabeth Titus 

Irma Josephine Tate 

Raymond William Uhl, $ a 

Marjorie Frances Virden 

Mary Kerlin Walters 

Elizabeth Ward 

Dorothy Moore Watson 

Milton Riley Westcott 

Andrew S. Whitaker, k 2 

John Josiah White, Jr., AY 

Marian Emilie Woerwag 



L_ 



I 



Former ^lembers of the Class of 1921 who are or have been in the Service 
are mentioned in the Swarthmore War Record. 



112 



J 

I 
z 

D 





CLASS OFriCI]\S 
TIAST SEMISTIR SECONJ) 5IMI5TEK 



Alb.rt L BdJtttr 
Marian W 5aT1erlhw«itc 



VICE PI^ESIBENT Willum K Ci^^c-, 
SECtvETAKY El;;,ai,eth E. (S-n'scm 

TREASURER T^ul SbarpU^s 




I 

z 

D 



]i:i 



HALCYON 



J 
I 

z 

D 




o 



< 
U 

X 

H 



r^-sgOK 



I 

z 

D 



114 



I 
z 

1 

L 



Members of tl)e (Tlass of 1922 

Marcelle Marie Achard Lyons, France 

Frank Ainsworth, <P 2 K, Mechanical Engineering - - - Swarthmore 

Agnes Mary Albright, Biologv ------- Harrisburg 

Ida Elizabeth Alvino - - - - - 76 Irving Place, New York City 

Dorothy Florence Anderson, English . . . . . Glenside 

John Bryant Barker - - - - Fornard and Tilbury Aves., Pittsburgh 

William Lord Battersby, K 2, Chemical Engineering, 4281 Mulberry St., Frankford 
Mary Isabel Baumgartner, a r, English 2445 N. 5th St., Philadelphia 

Albert Laurence Baxter, $ 2 K - - - - - - Chester 

Jackson Miller Blackburn, K 5, Mech. Eng., 3813 Powelton Ave., Philadelphia 
Francis Caton Blair, * k * - - - - - - Springfield, 111. 

Ernest Mason Bliss, Chemical Engineering - 212 S. 39th St., Philadelphia 
Bernice Gordon Bonner, $ 2 * - 4724 Springfield Ave., Philadelphia 

Thomas Frederick Bonsall, Engineering - _ - - Glenolden 

Sarah Inghram Boreman, KKr - - - - Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Elizabeth Currey Brackin ------- Lansdowne 



Latin 



- Hopewell, N. J. 
Philadelphia 

Avondale 

Camden, Del. 

Swarthmore 

Bridgeton, N. J. 

- Cheltenham 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 

- Millville, N. J. 
- West Chester 

Richmond Hill, N. Y. 



Carolyn Genevieve Braunv/orth, 

Katharine Wescott Briegel . - - . 

William Brinton BrosIUS, a Y, Chemical Engineering 

Louise Rhinelander Brown, French - - - 

JuANiTA Alberta Brunenmiller, French - 

Sarah Sheppard Butler, English - - - - 

Harold Lurcott Butterworth, * K 'I', Economics 

Edward Lambert Campbell, K 2, Economics - 

James Fenton Carter, $ a 0, Biology 

Charlotte Stevens Chrisman . - - - 

William Rufus Cisney, $ 2 K, Mathematics 

Allen Gray Clark, K 2, Mechanical Engineering, 5453 Cedar Ave., Philadelphia 

Kathryn Elizabeth Cleckner, n B $, English 1530 Green St., Harrisburg 

Norman Harvey Collisson, K 2, Engineering - - - Ocean City, N. J. 

Sarah Long Cook, K a © - - - - - - Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Edith Gilson Cugley, n b $ Philadelphia 

Margaret Culin, at Ogontz 

Thomas Ambrose Curran, Civil Engineering . . - . Morton 

George Morton Daller, $ 2 K Chester 

Hannah Mary Darlington - Pocopson 

Virgil Homer Dassel, Chemistrv . . . . . Elberfeld, Ind. 

LaMar Hay Davenport, $ a DuBois 

JeaNNETTE Dell, a n, English . . - . Woodbury, N. J. 

Daniel Landis Detwiler, ay Herndon, Va. 



n 



115 



I 




p 



]1(> 



^ 



u 



George Joseph Diggins, Jr., Ekdrkal Engineering - - - Chester 
Margaret Verna Doty - - - - 65 E. State St., Montpelier, Vt. 

William Kirk Downing, AY Locust Valley, N. Y. 

Frank Sidebotham Dudley, K2 - - - 1205 Arrot St., Frankford 

Harold Enos Dufendach, Ph])sics - - - . - - Kokomo, Ind. 

Dorothy Margaret Durbin Narberth 

John Evanson Earp, K S, Electrical Engineering, 2529 S. Cleveland St., Philadelphia 
WillaRD Slingerland Ellsbree, $ a 0, Political Science Preston Hollow, N. Y. 
Norman Firman Esibill, ay- - - - - - Millville, N. J. 

Alexander Johnson Esrey, $ 2 K, Civil Engineering - - Llanerch 

George Frank Esslinger, K 2 Elkins Park 

Ella Hansell Falck, n B *, Mathematics 874 Wynnewood Rd., Philadelphia 
Evalyn Frances Farquharson, French . . . - . Media 

Marjorie Lawrence Fell, KAO Philadelphia 

Walton Canby Ferris, $ 2 K, Engineering, 710 Prospect Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Vera Shearer Fletcher ..------ Bedford 

William Anthony Gaito, * 2 k, Engineering - - Bridgeport, Conn. 



Marion Baker Garrett, Hislor)} - 
Edith Elizabeth Gatchell, English - 
Anne Mary Gault, Mathematics 
Helen Gawthrop, K K r, French 
Carl Joseph Geiges, * K *, Economics 
Grace Carol Gibbs, Biology 



Philadelphia 

Rutledge 

Philadelphia 

1110 Shallcross Ave., Wilmington, Del. 

- 578 Spruce St., Camden, N. J. 

8 W. 1 28th St., New York, N. Y. 



1714 Green St. 



Edward Armstrong Gillespie, * K *, Engineering - 

Grace Edel Gourley, a r. Mathematics 

Charlotte Hand Griffin, a r. Biology 934 E. 1 8th St 

Mildred Elizabeth Grim, English . - . - 

Elizabeth Bradway Griscom, K K r - 

Alfred Baynard Gundlack, K 2, Engineering 

Dorothy Frances Haines, K K r, French 

Howard Lippincott Haines, Jr., $ a ©, Chemistry 

Anna Elizabeth Haldeman, English - - - 

Gladys Christine Haldeman, a r - 

Ormsby Duvall Hampson, <I> 2 K, Chemical Engineering 

Charles Beverly Hannum, Chemical Engineering 

Ellen Russell Hayes, k K r, English - 

Anna Frances Heafford, a r - 

Bertha Campf Hettinger, a ® n - 

Ethel Hinds 

Frank Hoke, B © IT, Engineering 



Swarthmore 

Melrose Park 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Perkasie 

- Salem, N. J. 

Roxboro 

Swarthmore 

Philadelphia 

- Malvern 

Winchester, Va. 

- Govans, Md. 

Rosedale 

West Chester 

312 N. 33rd St., Philadelphia 

Bridgeton, N. J. 

Washington, D. C. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



117 



^-A--A 



HALCYON 




Herman William Horn, Chemical Engineering, 12 Millboume Ave., Philadelphia 



I 
z 

D 



Moorestown, N. J. 

East Orange, N. J. 

153 Buttonwood St., Reading 

Richmond, Ind. 

Millville, N. J. 

Conshohocken 

2313 Green St., Philadelphia 

Chestnut Hill 



Helen Elizabeth Horner, a r, English 

Morris Herman Horowitz, Chemistv 

Herbert Lucius Hutchinson, $ a 0, Historv 

Miriam Alice Hutton, French - 

William Paxson Johnson, 2 * E, Chemisir]^ 

Florence Alline Jones, k a © - 

Henrietta Ida Keller, a r, English 

Albert Washburn Kelsey, English - 

William Henry Kinkead, Jr., K 2, Electrical Engineering - Fox Chase 

Hanna Evangeline Kirk -------- Wycombe 

Huldah Jones Kirk, n b * - - - - - - - - Carlisle 

Jean Bertram Knowles, k K r - - - - - - Flushing, N. Y. 

Herbert Francis Lambrecht, Chemical Engineering - Belleville, N. J. 

Frederick Norton Landon, $ 5 K, Mechanical Engineering - Swarthmore 

Beatrice Angeline Latshaw, French 

Christine Langham Latshaw, Latin - 

Wilkin Lillibridge Lauer . . - - 

Frank Henry Lemke, Civil Engineering 

William Sproul Lewis, $ k *, Economics 

Olin White Lippincott, $ k *, Economics 

Dorothy Josephine Little - . - - 

Dorothy Lottridge, Biology ----- 

William Peter Lowden, K S, Chemical Engineering 
Helen May Lutes ------ 

George Barrows McClellan, K 2, Chemistry 



Royersford 
Royersford 

- Port Allegany 

Chester 

- Chester 

Indianola, la. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

East Orange, N. J. 

Paulsboro, N. J. 

Chester 

- Arden, N. Y. 



OviATT McConnell, English ------ Buffalo, N. Y. 

Campbell Rogers McCullough, Chemistry - - - East Orange, N. J. 
Lawrence Joseph McEvoy, $ a 0, Economics, 52 W. Tulpehocken St., Philadelphia 



Daniel McGugan, Chemistry - 

Mary Blanche McMullen, English 

Neale MacNeill, Jr., ay - 

Barbara Manley, Chemistry 

Lucius Burgess Merriam - . - - 

Elizabeth Roberts Miller, English - 

Philippa Richards Moffatt 

Nathaniel Beals Moldawer 

Jesse Roger Moore, $ k *, Chemical Engineering 

Josephine Lawyer Moorhead 



Glenolden 

West Chester 

6161 Columbia Ave., Philadelphia 

I 43 E. Washington Lane, Philadelphia 

Rome, Ga. 

- - - Newtown 

- Sloatsburg, N. Y. 

3662 N. 21st Sl, Philadelphia 

- West Chester 

Rutledge 



Augustine Francis S. Musante, Chemical Engineering 



West Chester 



I 

z 



Dorothy Patten Nassau, a r - 

Jesse Nevyas, Chemistry - - - - 

Edna Ruth Newton, Mathematics 

Wesley Richard O'Neill, Jr., Chemistr]} 

Warren Harvey Ogden, $ K "I-, Chemistry 

Elsa Palmer, K a 0, Electrical EngMeering 

PuM Koo Park, Biology 

Margaret Pennock ------- 

Robert Spotswood Pollard, * ::; K, Electrical Engineering - Swarthmore 

Francis Osbourne Pouchot, * 2 k. History. - - Thompsonville, Conn. 



1515 Wallace St., Philadelphia 

West Chester 

Wawa 

Russellville 

Ogden 

Fanwood, N. J. 

Wahiawa, Oahu, T. H. 

Chatham 



William Joseph Pownall, a y. Engineering - - - - 

Allen Leon Putnam, Chemistry - 

Elizabeth Isabella Ralston, Public Speaking 

William Clarence Reese, Mechanical Engineering 

Irene Elizabeth Rems, Chem'.stry - - 3145 N. Camac St 

James Reuben Rickert, * 5 K, Civil Engineering 

Aileen Riley, Latin - ' - - - 56 Whittier Place, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Florence Marguerite Rose -------- Chester 

Edward Jackson Rutter, Civil Engineering ----- Glenolden 

Lois Ryan, Latin - - - - Forest Grove 



Coatesville 

Swarthmore 

Sharon Hill 

Rutledge 

Philadelphia 

Sellersville 



Richard Grafflin Sagebeer - - - - - 
Marian Willis Satterthwaite, k k r - 

Ruth Satterthwaite - 

Joseph Paul Schlicker, * K "I*, Engineering . . - 
Archie Truog Schreiber, Chemical Engineering - 
Walter Andrew Schultz, Electrical Engineering 

Irma Schwatt, a © n, 

Ewald Henry Schwengel, Chemistry - - - - 

Elizabeth Taylor Sellers, K a 

Harry McKinley Sellers, $ 5 K, Chemical Engineering 

Anna Elizabeth Shannon, n b *, French - - - 

Henry Mace Sharp, Mechanical Engineering . - - 

Kenneth Alfonces Sharp, Chemistry 

Paul Sharpless, * K *, Chemistry - - - - - 

Eleanor Anna Shinn, a n, German - 1711 N. 1 

Edith Imlay Silver, $ 2 * - 

Matilda Simpson, k k r - 



Berwyn 

Trenton, N. J. 

South Langhorne 

Trenton, N. J. 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Elberfeld, Ind. 

Philadelphia 

Elberfeld, Ind. 

- Swarthmore 

Pottstown 

Norfolk, Va. 

Elberfeld, Ind. 

Leesburg, N. J. 

Westbury, N. Y. 

6th St., Philadelphia 

Camden, N. J. 

Darby 



Richard William Slocum, $ a - - - 228 Chapel Terrace, Reading 
Edward Richard Smith, Civil Engineering - - - Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Colwell Smith, k K r, English - - - - West Chester 
Elsie Isabel Smith - - - - 1922 Bathgate Ave., New York, N. Y. 



I 

z 



119 



^-A--^ 



FRESHMEN 



i 



-7 

/ 



Gordon Smith, K 2, Engineering - - - 827 N. 63d St. 
John Colbourne Smith, $ a ®, Chemical Engineering - 
Sarah Marshall Stabler, k A ®, Public Speaking - 
Miriam Gertrude Stackhouse, Public Speaking - - - 
John Leech Stainton, <i> K *, Engineering 



Philadelphia 

Chester 

Swarthmore 

Hallowell 

- Chester 



George Woodbridge Stewart, * 2 K, Chemical Engineering, Woodhaven, N. Y. 
Margaret Stewart, K A®, - - - 611 W. 1 37th St., New York, N. Y. 
Arthur Lippincott Stiles, Engineering - - - Moorestown, N. J. 
Ernest Moody Straubel, Mechanical Engineering - - - - Upland 

John D. TaggeRT, Electrical Engineering . - - - Wakefield, Ky. 

Genevie\E Marie E. L. Tarby ----- Besancon, France 

Edith Colquhoun Taylor, English - 801 Windsor Square, Philadelphia 

William Thomson Taylor, a Y, Mechanical Engineering - - Ogontz 



Charles Laymon Terry, Jr., * 2 K 

Ruth Martha Thompson, n B $, French 

Helen Maria Thorne - - . - ■ 

Emma Eloise Tourny, $ 2 * - 

Axel Febiger H. Tsakonas, Chemistry 

Henrietta Jackson Turner - - - - 

Florence Wood Twining, k A ®, Public Speaking 

Dorothy Reid Varian, k K r. Biology - 

Harry Edward Walker, $ K *, Chemistry - 

Elizabeth Ann Walter, k a - 

William Pettit Ware, K 2 

Marion Shoemaker Warner, English 

Wintvie Miller Weihenmayer - 

Frances Wellington, n B $, 

Harriet Elizabeth Wetzel 

Carolien Hayes White, K K r, English, Marlborough-Blenheim, Atlantic City, N. J. 



Camden, N. J. 

Kennett Square 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Camden, N. J. 

Glenolden 

Belvidere, N. J. 

Ivyland 

Bridgeport 

Trenton, N. J. 

Swarthmore 

Salem, N. J. 

Horsham 

4519 Spruce St., Philadelphia 

3 Ridgewood Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Trenton 



Swarthmore 

Russellville 

Langhorne 

Glenolden 

Philadelphia 

- Berwyn 



John Wilmot Whittier, * a ®, Engineering 

Francis Dale Wickersham, $ a 0, Mechanical Engineering 

Florence Marshall Wildman, k a 

MoRRisA Waln Williams 

Robert Morgan Williamson - - - 4711 Pulaski Ave., 
Elizabeth Beatrice Wills, Mathematics - - - - 

Malcolm Rose Wise Clifton Heights 

James Ralph Wright, Chemistry Chester 

Meta D. Yarnall, English Yeadon 

William Curtis Young, * a 0, Chemistry - - - Millville, N. J. 

Charles Rollin Zane, Chemistry . . . - Leesburg, N. J. 

Myra Jeanne Zeiser 82 Carey Ave., Wilkes-Barre 



I 

z 



& ^ 



121 



^^^ 



HALCYON 



I 

z 

D 




I 

Z 



^ ^ 



122 



rRAiraiTiES 




123 



IKappa Sigma jF^raternit^ 

Founded at the University of Virginia, 1 869 




JuDSON TuppER Ballard 
Russell Conwell Gourley 
Harry Arthur Olin 

Edwin Monroe Bush 
George Conahey, Jr. 
Charles Waldo Haldeman, Jr. 

James Furnas Bogardus 
Richard Dodge Campbell 
William Porter Carter 
James Dawson Clancey 
Howard Bleasdale Katzenbach 
George Henry Kolb 
Harry Hartman Landis, Jr. 

William Lord Battersby 
Jackson Miller Blackburn 
Edward Lambert Campbell 
Allen Gray Clark 
Norman Harvey Collisson 
Frank Sidebotham Dudley 
John Evanson Earp 



PI CHAPTER 

Seniors 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Freshn 



Andrew Russell Pearson 
Andrew Simpson 
David John Stickney 

David Streeper Klauder, Jr. 
Leon Morris Pearson 
Charles Weyman Wassman 

Frank Krick Machemer 
Charles Singleton Mears 
George William Place 
George Alfred Powell 
Joseph Janvier Pugh 
William Hinchman Stow, Jr. 
Russell White 

George Frank Esslinger 
Alfred Raymond Gundlack 
William Henry Kinkead, Jr. 
William Peter Lowden 
George Barrows McClellan 
Gordon Smith 
William Pettit Ware , 



124 




< 
a, 
a, 
< 



liiil 



Pounded at Washington and Jefferson College, 1852 




PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA CHAPTER 



NoRRis Clements Barnard 
Edward Clayton Carris 



Detlev Wulf Bronk 
Walter Carroll Dickinson 



Juniors 



Franklin Simcoe Gillespie 
John Mahlon Ogden 



Gregg David Reynolds 
Theodore Richards Thompson 



Clarence Howard Yoder 



Sophomores 



Boyd Janney Brown 
Paul William Chandler 
Leon Howard Collins, Jr. 



William Powell Kemp 
Donald Swain Morgan 
Alan Chester Valentine 



Samuel Bentley Webb 



Freshn 



Francis Caton Blair 

Harold Lurcott Butterworth 

Carl Joseph Geiges 

Edward Armstrong Gillespie 

William Sproul Lewis 

Olin White Lippincott 



Jesse Roger Moore 
Warren Harvey Ogden 
Joseph Paul Schlicker 
Paul Sharpless 
John Leech Stainton 
Harry Edward Walker 



126 




< 

a. 

< 
•J. 

X 

a. 



127 



iDelta ICfsilon JP^raternit^ 



Founded at Williams College, 1834 



ip^f^f^ 




.. ..A.M^.J'.fl.. 



SWARTHMORE CHAPTER 



Allison Griscom Cornog 
William Lindsay Cornog 
Charles Manly Howell 



Allin Hugh Pierce 
Thomas Rowe Price, Jr. 
Osborne Robinson Quayle 



Harold Shoemaker Webster 



Juniors 



Frank Edward Atkins, Jr. 
Frank Whitson Fetter 



Clifford Riggs Gillam 
Howard Malcolm Jenkins 



Gilbert Ewing Tomlinson 



Sophomores 



Alfred Christensen 
Charles Benjamin Coles 
William Minton Harvey 



William Ronald Huey 
George Bement Jackson 
Robert Swift Joyce 



Townsend Sherman McAllister 



Freshn 



William Brinton Brosius 
Daniel Landis Detwiler 
William Kirk Downing 



Norman Firman Esibill 
Neale Macneill, Jr. 
William Joseph Pownall 



William Thomson Taylor 



128 




Q 



3 



< 
H 
J 

Q 



129 



P [)i Si^ma IKapfa JF^raternit^ 



Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873 




PHI CHAPTER 

Seniors 



Edwin Tudor Gowdy 



Charles Raymond Michener 



Juniors 

John Gilbert Albertson Arthur Wilfred Gardiner 

Alfred Tench Francis Donald Moore Headings 

James Minshall Holden 



Sophomores 



Eric Ainsworth 
Edward Evans Bartleson 
John Woolman Dudley 
Carroll Patterson Ford 
Norman Bird Grobert 



Frank Ainsworth 
Albert Laurence Baxter 
William Rufus Cisney 
George Morton Daller 
Alexander Johnson Esrey 
Walton Canby Ferris 
William Anthony Gaito 



Freshr, 



John Maddux Hilgert 
Harry William Lang 
Charles Plummer Larkin, Jr. 
Charles Wildey Lukens 
William Staunton Moylan 



Ormsby Duvall Hampson 
Frederick Norton Landon 
Robert Spotswood Pollard 
Francis Osborne Pouchot 
James Reuben Rickert 
Harry McKinley Sellers 
George Woodbridge Stewart 



Charles Laymon Terry, Jr. 



130 




< 

CL. 

< 

< 

o 



X 
a, 



1.31 



fifyi iDelta Ol)eta fvalo^vnil^ 

Founded at Miami University 1 848 




PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA CHAPTER 

Senior 
Charles Henry Yardley 



Stephen Clarence Bunting 
Paul IVIitchell Hess 
Henry Irvin Hoot 



juniors 



Charles Neff 

Horace Branson Passmore 

Ralph Erdman Wilson 



Alexander Lupold Bressler 
Richard Arment Darlington 
Wayland Hoyt Elsbree 



Sophomores 



Morrison Cushman McKinley 
Albert Conrad Mammel 
Raymond William Uhl 



George Malcolm West 



Freshn 



James Fenton Carter 
LaMar Hay Davenport 
Willard Slingerland Elsbree 
Howard Lippincott Haines, Jr. 
Ellis Marshall Harvey 
Herbert Lucius Hutchinson 



Lawrence Joseph McEvoy 
Richard William Slocum 
John Colbourn Smith 
John Wilmot Whittier 
Francis Dale Wickersham 
William Curtis Young 



132 




< 

X 
H 

< 
H 
J 
1x1 
Q 

5 

a. 



i:« 



lKapf>a ^lpl)a Ol)eta J^raternitY 

Founded at De Pauw University 1870 




ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 



Alice Naomi Adams 
Helen Roberta Biddle 
Mary Ingrahm Crosley 

Mary Alexander Campbell 
Lena Caroline Clark 
Marguerite Coles 
Lucy Lippincott 



Mary Clothier Hull 
Miriam Atkinson Jenkins 
Caroline Philips 



Sarah Long Cook 
Marjorie Lawrence Fell 
Florence Alline Jones 
Elsa Palmer 
Elizabeth Taylor Sellers 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Freshn 



Irma Kipp Russell 
Phebe Underhill Seaman 
Dorothy Young 

Martha Gertrude McCabe 
Letitia Tyler McNeel 
Gladys Seaman Pell 
Cornelia Miller Stabler 

Nellie Lee Walker 
Ruth McKeel Washburn 
Josephine Wildman 

Sarah Marshall Stabler 
Margaret Stewart 
Florence Wood Twining 
Elizabeth Ann Walter 
Florence Marshall Wildman 



134 




"TurifcTiir I tat 



135 



Founded at Monmouth College, Illinois, 1 867 




PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Seniors 



Jane Pancoast Brown 

Ruth Breuninger 

Katherine Vandevort Fahnestock 



Ruth Hay Cross 
Mary Hall Goodall 
Margaret Haviland 



Mary Elizabeth Wilson 



Juniors 



Dorothy Drew Coffin 
Frances Hause 
Isabel Sutton Jacobs 
Elizabeth Gest Jones 
Mary Eleanor Judge 

Miriam Edith Baily 
Anna Jemima Beatty 
Grace Brinton 
Katherine Eliza Donnelly 
Elizabeth Blakeley Graham 
Harriette Louise Greiner 



Kathryn Elizabeth Cleckner 
Edith Gilson Cugley 
Ella Hansell Falck 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



Dorothy Mary Paxson 
Helen Alexander Ramsey 
Helen Elizabeth Sigler 
Ellen Zeitler Swartz 
Beatrice Whiteside 



Dorothy Armstrong Kinsley 
Frances Katharine Miller 
Rachael Mae Sheetz 
Henrietta Floyd Stewart 
Emilie Hinds White 
Grace Taylor Wilson 



Huldah Jones Kirk 
Anna Elizabeth Shannon 
Ruth Martha Thompson 



Frances Wellington 



l::i6 




X 

a. 
< 

H 

CQ 



i:i7 



Founded at Monmouth College, Illinois, 1870 




BETA IOTA CHAPTER 



Ardis Mayhew Baldwin 
Catherine Reading Belville 
Elizabeth Neumann Frorer 
Elizabeth Andrews Hibberd 



Seniors 



Isabel Briggs Myers 
Eleanor Rae Runk 
Dorothy Thomas 
Frances Willard Young 



Doris Maria Hays 
Ida Elizabeth Meigs 



Juniors 

Lucy Marie Penrose 
Harriet Hale Renshaw 
Elizabeth Hope Richardson 



Sophomores 



Elizabeth Middleton Atherholt 
Helen Lydia Griscom 
Marjorie Estelle Kistler 
Frances Virginia Runk 



Charlotte Price Speakman 
Virginia Way 
Eleanor Rose Weber 
Janet Graham Young 



Freshn 



Sarah Inghram Boreman 
Helen Gawthrop 
Elizabeth Bradway Griscom 
Dorothy Frances Haines 
Ellen Russell Hayes 
Jean Bertram Knowles 



Elizabeth Roberts Miller 
Marian Willis Satterthwaite 
Matilda Simpson 
Elizabeth Colwell Smith 
Dorothy Reid Varian 
Carolien Hayes White 



138 




< 

s 
s 
< 

< 

a, 
< 

< 

< 



139 



i)elta (Bamma JF^raternitY 



Founded at Oxford Institute, Mississippi, 1873 




ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 



Janet McPherson Brown 
Dorothea Lindsay Darlington 
Bess McClellan 



Esther Anne Newcomer 
Helen Koons Robey 
Mary Headley Vernam 



Frances Baker Williams 



Julia Thurston Bope 
Charlotte Andrews Bunting 
Elizabeth Catherine Jones 



Juniors 



Ethel Gibbons Means 
Eleanor Yorke Shartel 
Henrietta Albert Smith 



Grace Agnes Ballinger 
LoRNA Beatrice Christie 
Janet Clark 



Sophomores 



Hildegarde Hexamer 
Helen Cooper Knight 
Mildred Carmeny Stout 



Freshn 



Mary Isabel Baumgartner 
Margaret Atkinson Culin 
Grace Adele Gourley 
Charlotte Hand Griffin 
Gladys Christine Haldeman 



Anna Frances Heafford 
Helen Elizabeth Horner 
Henrietta Ida Keller 
Dorothy Patten Nassau 
Helen Maria Thorne 



140 




< 
< 

H 
J 
Id 

a 



141 



fi[)i Sigma 4^1)1 J^raterRit^ 

Founded at Swarthmore College 1918 
Granted Charter in Chi Omega, April, 1919 



Senior 
Helene Barrett Scott 



Sophomores 



ViRiGiNiA Laws Coleman 
Mary Dotterer 
Margaret Wilson Embery 
Eleanor Wickersham Green 
Ethel Johanna Kaplan 



Virginia Morse Packard 
Lucy Ayres Rainier 
Iona Genevieve Sutch 
Charlotte Graves Washburn 
Evelyn Engel Wich 



Freshmen 



Bernice Gordon Bonner 
Elsie Isabel Smith 



Edith Imlay Silver 
Emma Eloise Tourny 



142 





a. 
< 



143 



^lpl)a Ol)eta pi Jraternlt^ 



Founded at Swarthmore College 1918 



Helen Hutchinson Reid 
Elinor Christina Stout 



5enio 



Marian Cleveland Ware 
Edith Young 



Edna PrisciLla Evans 
Mary Natalie Donovan 
Edna May Davies 



Juniors 



Mary Nagle 

Mary Elizabeth Oehrle 

Mildred Estelle Williard 



Sophomores 

Eleanore Albina Butler Elizabeth Bope Klemm 

Frances Louise Purdy Catherine Ott Rhoads 

Thelma Marguerite Taylor 



Jeannette Dell 
Bertha Campf Hettinger 



Freshn 



Irma Schwatt 
Eleanor Anna Shinn 



144 




145 




FIND PREXY 



CELESTIAL SCENES 




146 





Uommentaire 




PVBLICATION/ 



147 




Ol)e 4^l)oenix 



Published on Tuesdays During the College Year by the 
Students of Swarthmore College 

Ediior-in-Chkf 
Drew Pearson, '19 



Associate Editors 

Frances B. Williams, '19 
Detlev "W. Bronk, '20 

Local Editors 

Eleanor W. Atkinson, ']'■. 
Edwin M. Bush, '20 
Leon M- Pearson, '20 
Lucy M. Penrose, '20 
Lorna B. Christie, '21 
Alan C. Valentine, '21 



Business Manager 

James F. Bogardus, '21 

Alumni Editors 

Anna L. Curtis, '04 
William H. Thatcher, '00 
Alden B. Jones, '13 
Caroline A. Lukens, '98 



l-IS 




mmentaire 



^ >^av Pear 

By Drfav Pearson, Editor 

Since the opinion of an editor who has piloted his sheet through the rocky shoals of 
a war year is a trifle more prejudiced than the opinion of a mother who has just looked 
upon her first-born, perhaps it would be better for me to tell not what the Phoenix did, 
but what it tried to do, and to allow you to be your own judges of its success. 

The Phoenix had three main objects in view during the past year. These were to 
keep in close touch with Swarthmore's sons in the Service, to knit the Alumni closer than 
ever to their Alma Mater, and in the constant unrest of the post-war period, to aid in di- 
recting college sentiment and student opinion towards the ultimate right. 

In its attempt to keep in close touch with the Swarthmore men in the Service, the 
Phoenix detailed certain members of its staff to bombard the men, their parents, and their 
friends with constant letters of inquiry as to their whereabouts and their work. With 
this information the Phoenix published three Service Directories which were as complete 
as possible, and which aided materially in compiling the permanent Service Record for 
the college. The Phoenix also made a reduced subscription rate of one dollar for all 
men in the Service, and waged a campaign in order to get other Swarthmoreans to sub- 
scribe for the boys. Although this campaign fell short by one hundred dollars, we con- 
tinued to send the Phoenix to every man at our own expense. Thanks to various Swarth- 
moreans in the Service, the Phoenix was also able to print each week a specially prepared 
feature story which told of the different phases of war work in more detailed form. 

At the start of the college year, the Phoenix pushed a campaign to increase its cir- 
culation, with the result that several hundred more Alumni norv receive the Phoenix and 
the nervs from Swarthmore than ever before in the history of the college. 

Probably in no other year in the history of the college has there been such oppor- 
tunity for editorial discussion. For this year has seen its red-hot militarists and its con- 
scientious objectors, its collegiate Bolshevists and its collegiate capitalists. It has been 
a plastic year, a year of changes. The Phoenix has endeavored to do what it could in 
its small way to point out and fight for that policy which seemed to be for the best in- 
terests of Swarthmore. Sometimes it has been right ; sometimes it has been wrong. The 
most important policies for which it fought are: rifles on the campus, the elimination of 
goat-feathers, the betterment of scholarship, a system of universal and required athletics, 
and deferred pledging into fraternities. 

One other thing: In a year when even some of the big New York publications 
failed to come off the press, the Phoenix missed not one issue. Once, when our printers 
were laid off with influenza, we were two days late. But we got out our issue, and con- 
tinued to do so in spite of the flu, the restrictions prohibiting men to leave the campus, 
and the irregularity of the second class mail. And the point I am getting at is that it 
would have been impossible for us to do this had it not been for the support which the 
women gave us. As newspapermen, the women were naturally not a howling success 
at the start. But they weren't afraid of the "dirty work"; they stuck, and they im- 
proved with time. Many of them stuck in spite of the fact that they knew that they would 
get nothing in return. Mav I tak,e this opportunity to thank '^ese women who made pos- 
sible the first issues of the Phoenix. 



149 




Ol)e l920 3ia[c^on 



Editor-in-Chief 
Leon M. Pearson 



Associate Editors 

Mary A. Campbell 
Edwin M. Bush 

The Staff 

Louise Carman 
Marguerite P. Drew 
Doris M. Hayes 
Lucy M. Penrose 
Harriet H. Renshaw 
Gregg D. Reynolds 
Henrietta A. Smith 
Charles W. Wassman 

Circulation Manager 

R. Erdman Wilson 



Business Manager 

C. Waldo Haldeman 

Artists 

Beatrice Whiteside, Managing 

Preston H. Judd 

E. LuciLE Noble 

M. Elizabeth Oehrle 

Dorothy Paxson 

Photographers 

Howard M. Jenkins 
George B. Leeder 
John F. Styer 



150 



Ol)e C)l)irtY-flftl)3*rttlcYon 

The fact that it is the thirty-fifth Halcyon is important 
only in the Hght of the fact that everybocly thought the 
thirty-fourth was going to be the last for a while. A year 
ago when Mars was solemnly taking the toll of the Swarth- 
more activities — even the Soph Show went — people talked 
of a Halcyon that would be "a mere historical record," a 
sort of a post-mortem on Swarthmore as she used to be! 

And that was the basis on which the 1920 staff started 
to work. You have before you the result of the work of 
the staff. We need no longer praise our book to high 
heaven like we did to sell it, for it is sold — 600 copies of it — 
a hundred more than ever before. So now we are modest. 
We leave it to your judgment whether we were warranted 
in departing from that first injunction about the historical rec- 
ord, and whether the departure was a success. 

Now that the curtain has gone down on the last act, it 
is the logical time for bouquets. Yes, there is a satisfaction 
in shaking hands all round and thanking ourselves and each 
other for the part we have all played in turning out The 
Book. But the genuine satisfaction comes in the realiza- 
tion of a task accomplished and — if you but enjoy our 
Book — of a task well done. 



151 






CHEM SCENES 





152 



MTE5 




Ol)e i)ebatln9 Season. 

ON THE RAILROAD PROBLEM 

Question: "Resolved, That the Federal Government should continue to control 
and operate the railroads for a period of at least five years." 



5wartl)more vs. !^ational Caw Scl)Ool 

Washington, D. C, February 28, 1919 

Srvarlhmore (Affirmative) Team: 
Mr. Pearson, Mr. Hodge, Mr. Bogardus 

Won by National Law School 



153 




Swartl)more (TolUse i)^bate !^oar6 

Executive Commillee 
President --------- Allin H. Pierce 

Secretarv-Treasurer ------- James F. Bogardus 

Coach - - - - WiLBER J. Kay 

Faculty -.- Prof. P. M. Pearson 

Faculty - - - Prof. J. H. Holmes 

Faculiv --------- Prof. G. F. Blessing 



Student Members 



Allin H. Pierce. '19 
Drew Pearson, '19 
D. M.alcolm Hodge, '19 
Detlev W. Bronk, ' 1 9 
Herschel L. Clark, '20 
Russell C. Gourley, ' 1 9 



Leon H. Collins, Jr., '21 
James F. Bogardus, '2 1 
Alan C. Valentine, '2 1 
Herbert L. Hutchinson, '22 
Francis C. Blair, '22 
Richard W. Slocum, '22 



154 



Swart^more vs. Orinitj (Lollege 

SWARTHMORE, MaRCH 15, 1919 

Srvarihmore (Affirmaiive) Team: 
Mr. Valentine, Mr. Hodge, Mr. Bogardus 

Won by Swarthmore 

5wartl)more vs. 3uniata dollege 

Huntingdon, Pa., March 22, 1919 

Swarthmore (Affirmative) Team: 
Mr. Pearson, Mr. Hodge, Mr. Bogardus 

Won by Swarthmore 

Swarthmore vs. (tfeorge Xi^ast)ington Kniversitp 

Washington, D. C, April 4, 1919 

Swarthmore (Affirmative) Team: 
Mr. Pearson, Mr. Hodge, Mr. Bogardus 

Won by Swarthmore 

Swarthmore (Negative) Team 
Mr. Collins, Mr. Hutchinson, Mr. Clark 

Won by George Washington 

nExtemf>oraneous"2)(ibate 

April 9th, 1919 

Swarthmore vs. Princeton University 
AT Princeton, N. J. 

Swarthmore Team 
Mr. Bogardus, Mr. Valentine, Mr. Hodge 

Mr. Gourley, Alternate 

Won by Princeton 



155 



Obe Sophomore - jFresl)man iDebate 

For the President's Prize 
January 21, 1919 

Question: "Resolved, That the Sophomore Show shall be retained as a 
College institution." 



Sophomore Team (Affirmative) 

James F. Bogardus 
William P. Kemp 
Alan C. Valentine 



Freshman Team (Negative) 

Francis C. Blair 
Herbert L. Hutchinson 
Richard W. Slocum 



Won by the Affirmative Team 

Chairman 
Allin H. Pierce 

Judges 
Dr. F. a. Speck of University of Pennsylvania 
Mr. H. Winney of Swarthmore Preparatory School 
Mr. W. H. Thatcher, '00, of Swarthmore College 



156 



Seventeenth Annual iDeclamation Contest 

December 6, 1918 

The Conlesianis 

'A Scene From Romance" ----- Edwin Sheldon 

Cornelia M. Stabler, '20 



"The Copperhead 



Augustus Thomas 



Leon M. Pearson, '20 



'Ramsey Milholland" - - - - , - " Booth Tarkinglon 

Helen K. Robey, '19 



The Wild Cat" 



Albert Terhune 



Drew Pearson, '19 



"Lilac Time" . . - . - Jane Murfin and Jane Kowl 

Katherine V. Fahnestock, '19 

Selection from "The Christmas Carol" - - - Charles Dickens 

Dorothy Young, '19 

First Prize, $35.00 — Mr. Leon Pearson 
Second Prize, $15.00 — MiSS STABLER 
Honorable Mention — Mr. Drev/ Pearson 

Judges 

Ruth Verlenden, '1 1 Mrs. Frank Griffin, '10 

Wilbur J. Kay 



157 




Annual Oratorical (Tontest 

For the Delia Upsilon Prize 
April 11, 1919 



'Our Debt to Humanity" . . - 

'Making the World Safe for Little Children" 



Drew Pearson, '19 



'Fire Proof or Ashes" 
■Russia's Challenge to America" 
'America's Duty" 
'The Future of the Race" 
'Peace and Universal Service" 



Katherine v. Fahnestock, '19 

Herbert L. Hutchinson, '22 

Edgar Z. Palmer, '19 

D. Malcolm Hodge, '19 

Detlev W. Bronk, '20 

Frank W. Fetter, "20 



Decision 
$25 Prize — Won by Mr. Pearson 

Honorable Mention 

Mr. Fetter 

Judges 

Miss Edna H. Richards Dr. Jesse H. Holmes 

Miss Margaret McIntosh, '15 



158 




159 




THE CAST OF CAPTAIN JINKS 



"(Laptain 'SinKs of tl)ell*for$e Mlarines" 

He aidn't get my horseshoe!" And with these words from the proudly victori- 
ous newsboy, the curtain fell, and the Sophomore Show of the Class of 1920 was a 
thing of the past — passed, but not to be forgotten. 

It wasn't like the Soph Shows of other days. It mingled a variety of delightful 
musical comedy, skillful acting, and scenes and dances that carried the audience back to 
the by-gone days in the early seventies, when Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines courted 
and won the fair Madame Trentoni. 

Cornelia Stabler, in the role of Madame Trentoni, played the part of the much feted 
belle of the stage, of the anxious, then disappointed, lover, and finally of the maiden 
happy in the realization of the fulfillment of life's greatest hopes, and she played it with 
an ease and naturalness which gave credit not only to herself but as well to Miss Eliza- 
beth Oliver, coach of the production. 

Leon Pearson, as the little newsboy, kept the audience in constant shrieks of laugh- 
ter during the tense scenes, when the silver lining was deeply hidden from the eyes 
of his adored Madame Trentoni. And, from the beginning of the play, when he took 
boyish delight in pointing out the wrong lady to the "gentlemen of the press," up to the 
very end, when he rescued his hard-earned horseshoe wreath from the sturdy policeman, 
he was welcomed with laughter and applause whenever he appeared upon the scene. 

Thomas L. Eagan was the happy, gaily clad Captain Jinks. He played his part 
ably, and in spite of his early partners and later rivals, Charley Wassman and Frank 
Jenkins, he persevered till the end, when to the relief of all, he won the much sought-after 
Madame Trentoni. As for Papa Belliarti, no one could have been better fitted for that 
part than Bill Irwin, with his soft deep voice and deliberate fatherly ways. Mary Camp- 
bell made a very energetic elderly aunt, Charlotte Moore, the deaf and dumb girl, and 
Letitia McNeel, Mrs. Jinks. They all played their parts with remarkable skill. 

An account of 1 920's Soph Show would not be complete if it failed to pass out 
a little bouquet to the clever sextette of dancers, Hope Richardson, Lucy Penrose, Beatrice 



160 



Whiteside, Lucy Lippincott, Helen Sigler and Dorothy Coffin. Their inimitable inter- 
ludes seasoned the drear dialogue with a beauty and grace which we had never hoped 
to enjoy this side of the "Forest." A pleasure of a somewhat different sort was offered 
by the jolly jiggers of the sailor's horn pipe, which started the play m a rollicking spirit 
of good time. 

But let us not forget the men behmd the hnes, to whom much of the success of the 
show was due, for with Cliff Gillam as business manager, and Dave Klauder as stage 
manager, the whole performance went ''over the top" in a way that reflected creditably 
on their managership, and made "Captain Jinks of the Horse Marmes" the big success it 
proved to be. 

And, when the play was over, and the curtain fell for the last time, there was a 
feeling of regret among the members of the Class of 1 920, that the happy hours spent 
with Captain Jinks were really over. And yet, there was consolation in the thought that 
they could be lived all over again, whenever one felt like turning to that chapter in Life's 
Memory Book. 

The cast of ihe pla^ is as follows: 

Captain Robert Carrolton Jinks - - - . 

Charles LaMartine ..-.-. 

Augustus Von Vorkenburg - - - - - 

Professor Belliarti ------ 

The Herald Reporter ----- 

The Tribune Reporter ------ 

The Times Reporter - - - 

The Sun Reporter --.-_. 



Thomas L. Eagan 

Charles Wassman 

Francis A. Jenkins 

William Y. Irwin, Jr. 

David D. Griscom 

C. Scott Woodside 

William H. Norris 

Gregg D. Reynolds 




1(51 



The Clipper Representative 

A Newsboy 

A Servant 

An Official Detective 

A Sailor 

A Policeman 

A Telegraph Boy 

Mrs. Greenborough 

Mme. Trentoni 

Mrs. Jinks - 

Mrs. Stonington 

Miss Merriam 

Mary (Aurelia's Maid) 



Frank W. Fetter 

Leon M. Pearson 

Frank E. Atkins 

Ervin L. Hall 

Joseph S. Sickler 

George Conahey 

Jack Albertson 

Mary Campbell 

Cornelia M. Stabler 

Letitia T. McNeel 

Henrietta A. Smith 

Charlotte E. Moore 

Marian Hoag 



Ol)is year's (buiba to Ol)eatre (Boers 

Founder's Day Play — Nothing doing. 

Soph Show — A noisy hour party for Freshmen the first week of college. The first 
Soph Show was acted a thousand years ago. Since that time. Captain Jinks has 
been the only one worth wasting a war tax on. 

Glee Club Concert — This is our concertless year. 

Pirates of Penzance — A delightful musical comed]), acted rvith extreme gusto and 
laissezfaire, and passed bv the Pennsvlvania Board of Censors. The principal song 
hit was, "Ain't It Hell to Be a Belgian Bahv ?" 

Hamburg Show — Save money from the other shows and see them all taken off here. 

Dec. Contest — Leading roles played by Pearson Bros. 

Fourth West Noisy Hour Party — Scarf dance (censored). 




162 



3unior Recitals 

Isabel S. Jacobs in "Daddy Long Legs" 

On Tuesday evening, February 25, Isabel S. Jacobs gave as her Junior Re- 
cital, Jean Webster's "Daddy Long Legs." The play involves the story of a little 
orphan girl, who, after suffering numerous hardships in the orphanage, goes to college, 
and in the end marries her benefactor. All agreed that Isabel impersonated the 
many characters most skillfully, and in a way that reflected creditably not only 
upon herself, but also upon Miss Elizabeth Oliver, who coached the recital. And 
those of us who heard Isabel read will not forget the httle phrase, "Yes, ma'am, 
no ma'am and smile," nor the way she said it, for that alone has made her famous 
in the eyes of her fellow students. 



Cornelia M. Stabler in "Polly With a Past" 

"Polly With a Past" was given in a most talented way by Cornelia M. Stabler 
on the evening of March 20th. "Cornie" brought her listeners to tears and laughter 
as she skillfully told the story of Polly, the little maid of all work, who impersonated 
a French Vampire to help a friend win the girl he loved, and in the end married 
that friend herself. "Cornie," showed unusual talent in all the roles she played, 
the French woman, with the true Parisian accent ; Polly ; Rex, the rich man's son ; 
the old gardener with his Irish brogue; and Mr. Prentiss, the kind old uncle. 

Our only regret was that we did not have more such talented people in our 
class, to bring us honor, and entertain in such a delightful way. 



163 





May Day 
and 




Pomander 
Walk 





164 




# %// 





165 



Epsilon Chapter of Pennsylvania 



Officers 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary)- Treasurer 



Abby Mary Hall Roberts, '90 

J. Carroll Hayes, '89 

Helen B. S. Brinton, '95 



Executive Committee 



Ethel Brewster, '07 

Mary Wolverton Green, '92 



William I. Hull (Faculty) 
Roland G. Kent, '95 



Charter Members 

Edward H. Magill (Brown University Chapter) 
William H. Appleton (Harvard University Chapter) 

Fratres in Facultate 

William H. Appleton (Harvard Chapter) 
Elizabeth Powell Bond (Swarthniore Chapter) 
IsABELLE Bronk (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Robert C. Brooks (Indiana University Chapter) 
Edgar White Burrill (Amherst Chapter) 
Susan J. Cunningham (Swarthniore Chapter) 
Harold C. Goddard (Amherst Chapter) 
Maud Bassett Gorham (Radcliff Chapter) 
J. Russell Hayes (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Jesse H. Holmes (Nebraska University Chapter) 
William I. Hull (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Henrietta J. Meeteer (Indiana University Chapter) 
John A. Miller (Indiana University Chapter) 
Clara Price Newport ( Swarthmore Chapter) 
Louis N. Robinson (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Joseph Swain (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Ethel Hampson Brewster (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Caroline H. Smedley (Swarthmore Chapter) 



*Arthur Beardsley 
Elizabeth Powell Bond 
^William W. Birdsall 



Honorary Members 

Isaac H. Clothier 
Susan J. Cunningham 
Franklin Spencer Edmonds 



*Howard M. Jenkins 
*WiLLiAM P. Potter 
Joseph Swain 



Eleanor W. Atkinson 
Elizabeth N. Frorer 
Phyllis M. Komori 



Class oi 1919 

Isabel Briggs Myers 
Edgar Z. Palmer 
Drew Pearson 
Charles Henry Yardley 



]\[argaret E. Powell 
Gladys A. Reichard 
Esther G. Taylor 



Class oi 1920 



Marguerite P. Drew 



Henrietta A. Smith 



*Deceased. 



166 



Mlortar ^oar6 

Founded February 20, 1918 

The Honorary Society for Senior Women, whose purpose is the furthering of student 

responsibility toward the best interests of the College. The members are 

chosen with reference to leadership, scholarship, and 

service to Swarthmore 



1919 

Eleanor Williams Atkinson Dorothy Herrmann Lukens 

Catherine Reading Belville Isabel Briggs Myers 

Katherine Vandevort Fahnestock Gladys Amanda Reichard 
Phyllis Miki Komori Mary Headley Vernam 

Frances Baker Williams 



1920 

Lena Caroline Clark Gladys Seaman Pell 

Marguerite Pendleton Drew Helen Alexander Ramsey 

Henrietta Albert Smith 



167 



iDelta Sigma ^l)0 



Founded at Chicago, April 1 3, 1 906 

"An organization to encourage effective and sincere public speaking" 

Students who have represented the College in an Inter-Collegiate Debate or Oratorical 
Contest are eligible for membership at the end of their Junior year 



President 
Secretary- Treasurer 



Swarlbmore (Tbapter 

Officers 



Drew Pearson 
Detlev W. Bronk 



Active Members 

Detlev Wolf Bronk, 1919 David Malcolm Hodge, 

William Wallace Hewett, 1919 Drew Pearson, 1919 

Allin Hugh Pierce, 1919 



919 



Alumni Members 



Francis Grant Blair, 1897 
Bird Thomas Baldwin, 1900 
Elizabeth Percy Sutton, 1903 
Joshua Hibbert Taylor, 1903 
Halliday Rogers Jackson, 1904 
Philip Marshall Hicks, 1905 
Caroline Hadley Robinson, 1906 
Robert Leslie Ryder, 1 906 
Amos Jenkins Peaslee, 1907 
Simeon Van Trump Jester, 1908 
George Gustavus Dilworth, 1908 
Louis Russell Coffin, 1 909 
William Russell Tyler, 1910 
Gurdeon Blodgett Jones, 1910 
Raymond Keenan Denworth, 1911 
Joseph Henry Willets, 1911 
Charles Aaon Collins, 1912 

Dean Copper 



William King Hoyt, 1912 
J. Augustus Cadwallader, 1912 
Washington Russell Green, 1913 
*A. Roy Ogden, 1914 
Raymond T. Bye, 1914 
Claud Corall Smith, 1914 
Paul Miller Cuncannon, 1915 
William Wesley Matson, 1915 
Hugh Frederick Denworth, 1916 
Edwin Augustus Tomlinson, 1916 
P. Carl Shrode, 1916 
Clarence Gates Myers, 1917 
*Harold Ainsworth, 1917 
James Clarence Lukens, 1917 
William West Tomlinson, 1917 
Paul Fleming Gemmill, 191 7 
Lynn Hamilton Baily, 1917 
Widener, 1918 



^Deceased. 



168 



Sigma Oau 



Founded at the University of Nebraska, February 24, 1 904 

Majors in Engineering who have displayed marked ability in scholarship are eligible 
at the end of their Junior or Senior years 



Faculty Members 



George F. Blessing 
George W. Lewis 



Lev/is Fussell 
Charles Thatcher 



Alumni Members 
'13 



William Penn Lukens, 
W. Harry Gillam, ' 1 3 
Har\'ey Vaughn Bressler, '14 
Milton H. Fussell, Jr., '15 
F. Lawrence Pyle, '16 
J. SiDDONs Neville, '16 
Lynn H. Bailey, '1 7 



Richard L. Burdsall, 
Randolph B. Harlan, 
Adolph Korn, ' 1 7 
Walter B. Lang, 'I 7 
G. Donald Spackman, 
H. Freeman Barnes, '1 
Louis N. Davis, '18 



Detlev W. Bronk 



Ralph H. Heacock, '18 

Student Members 
1919 

Charles M. Howell 
Andrew Simpson 



17 
17 



17 



1920 
Howard M. Jenkins 



Chapters 

University of Nebraska 
University of Iowa 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of South Dakota 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
Oregon State College 



Washington State College 
University of Illinois 
University of Colorado 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Kansas 
University of Oklahoma 



Swarthmore College 



169 



!^ook anb IKe^ Senior Society 

JuDsoN TuppER Ballard 
Edward Clayton Carris 
Edwin Tudor Gowdy 
Charles Manley Howell 
Drew Pearson 
Allin Hugh Pierce 
Andrew Simpson 



170 




171 




David Braman Fell 
Frank Whitson Fetter 
John Robert Fetter 
Alfred Tench Francis 
Clifford Riggs Gillam 
Charles Waldo Haldeman 
David Streeper Klauder 
Gregg David Reynolds 
Ralph Erdman Wilson 
Clarence Howard Yoder 



]72 



GOVERNMENTS 




AND 

PARTIES 



173 




^en's Stu6ent (Bovernment Association 

Executive Boards 

First Semester 

President .----.-. Edward C. CarRIS, ' 1 9 

5ecre/arj) --------- Edwin M. Bush, '20 

Charles M. Howell, '19 Drew Pearson, '19 

Frank W. Fetter, '20 

Second Semester 

President - - Allin H. PlERCE, '19 

5ccre/arj) Edwin M. Bush, '20 

Edward C. Carris, '19 John M. Ogden, '19 

R. Erdman Wilson, '20 



174 




"Somen's Student (Bovernmeat Association. 

Executive Boards 

First Semester 
President .....-- Catherine R. Belville, '19 

Vice President - - Gladys S. Pell, '20 

Treasurer .....--- RuTH H. Cross, '19 

Secretary - - Helen L. Griscom, '21 

Mary H. Vernam, '19 Frances W. Young, '19 

Mary E. Wilson, '19 Helen A. Ramsey, '20 

Ellen Z. Swartz, '20 

Second Semester 
President - - . . . _ . Eleanor R. Runk, '19 

Vice President MARGUERITE P. Drew, '20 

Treasurer ........ Marion C. Ware, ' 1 9 

Secretary ........ Caroline Philips, '2! 

Catherine R. Belville, '19 Frances B. Williams, '19 

Josephine M. Griffiths, '19 Doris M. Hays, '20 

Ida E. Meigs, '20 



175 



Poun^ Mien's (ri)rlshan Association, 



Organized September, 1910 



President 

Secretary- Treasurer 



Officers 



Charles M. Howell, '1' 
■ NoRRis C. Barnard, '1' 



Cabinet 



Department of Meetings 
Department of Membership 
Department of Missionary Work 
Department of Bible Study 
Department of Finance 



C. Waldo Haldeman, '20 

Edwin M. Bush, '20 

C. Raymond Michener, '19 

R. Erdman Wilson, '20 

Harold S. Webster, '19 



176 



^oung Somen's (ri)ri5tlan Association 

Organized February, 1911 

Officers 

President Katherine V. Fahnestock, '1 9 

Vice President Marion C. Ware, ' 1 9 

Secretary Dorothy B. Boring, '21 

Treasurer Emily E. Hallauer, '2 1 

Annual Member Mary I. Crosley, ' 1 9 



Cabinet 



Chairman Religious Meetings Committee 
Chairman Bible Sludv Committee 
Chairman Social Committee 
Chairman Social Service Committee 
Chairman Missionarv Committee 
Chairman Membership Committee 
Chairman Finance Committee 
Chairman Association Netvs Committee 



Esther A. Newcomer, '19 

Lena C. Clark, '20 

Mary A. Campbell, '20 

Margaret Haviland, '19 

Helen A. Ramsey, '20 

Marion C. Ware, '19 

Emily E. Hallauer, '21 

Dorothy B. Boring, '21 



177 



Somerville Citerar^ Society 



Founded, 1871 



Motto — "Sauviter in Modo, Fortiter in Re" 



President . - - . 

Vice President . - . 

Recording Secretarv 
Corresponding Secretary 

Assistant Corresponding Secretaries 

Treasurer . . . . 

Librarian 

Assistant Librarians 



Frances B. Williams, '19 

Marguerite P. Drew, '20 

Eleanor W. Green, '21 

Elizabeth N. Frorer, '19 

Sarah J. Mayhew, '20 
Frances Hause, '20 

Julia T. Bope, '20 

Ruth M. Orndorff, '19 

Helen L. Griscom, '21 

Elizabeth F. Barth, 21 

Lucy A. Rainier, '21 



178 



iD[)z 3n.ter-(rolk9iat(i (Tommunit^ Service 
^Association 

Formerly College Settlement Association, Founded November, 1904, "To 

interest College women m social service, and to provide 

opportunity for such work" 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Senior Elector 
Junior Elector 
Sophomore Elector 



Dorothy Young, '19 

Gladys Hammond, '20 

Frances Purdy, '21 

Elizabeth Frorer, '19 

Charlotte Bunting, '20 

Elizabeth Knabe, '21 



179 



Cngmeers (Tlub 

Organized 1915 

For the purpose of reviewing recent discoveries and achievements in engineering, discussing 

questions not raised in the classroom, giving power in the presentation of topics, 

promoting intimacy between faculty and students, and providing 

guidance in the engineering vocations 



President 
Vice Presidenl 
Secretary- Treasurer 

President 

Vice President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



NoRRis C. Barnard 
Charles M. Howell 



John G. Albertson 
T. Howard Atkinson 
Stephen C. Bunting 
Edwin M. Bush 

Edward E. Bartleson, 3rd 
Alexander L. Bressler 
George L. Burnett 
Paul W. Chandler 
George B. Jackson 



William L. Battersby 
Ernest M. Bliss 
William R. Cisney 
Allen G. Clark 



Officers 

First Semester 



Second Semester 



Members 

19/9 

C. Raymond Michener 

1920 

Herschel L. Clark 
George Conahey, Jr. 
A. Tench Francis 

1921 

Robert S. Joyce 
Harry W. Lang 
C. Wildey Lukens 
T. Sherman McAllister 
Frank K. Machemer 
Raymond E. Macksey 

1922 

Alexander J. Esrey 
Alfred R. Gundlack 
Herbert F. Lambrecht 
William P. Lowden 



Harold S. Webster 

George Conahey, Jr. 

Gregg D. Reynolds 

C. Raymond Michener 

Henry I. Hoot 

- Edwin M. Bush 



Andrew Simpson 
Harold S. Webster 



Paul M. Hess 
Henry I. Hoot 
Howard M. Jenkins 
Arthur W. Gardiner 

Donald S. Morgan 
George A. Powell 
Clarence A. Short 
J. Edward Waples 
George M. West 



Edward F. McGinley 
Vincent B. Schneider 
John L. Stainton 
George W. Stewart 



ISO 




'^-'^'*» 




Swartl)more (Eolle^e ^tl)UUc Association 

Organized November 14, 1877 
Motto — "Mens sans in corpore sano" 

Officers 1918-1919 

President --.-..-.. Andrew Simpson 

Vice President NoRRIs C. Barnard 

Secretan - - Edwin M. BusH 

Treasurer - Drew Pearson 

Graduate Manager - - - Samuel C. Palmer 

Athletic Council 

President A. A. -------- ANDREW SiMPSON 

Treasurer A. A. - - Drew Pearson 

Physical Director E. LeRoy Mercer 

Graduate Manager ------- Samuel C. Palmer 

'^Football Captain ------ WiLLIAM L. RiDPATH, Jr. 

Basketball Captain ------- CLARENCE H. YoDER 

Lacrosse Captain -...-.. ANDREW SiMPSON 

Baseball Captain -------- Edward C. Carris 

Track Captain - - - Allin H. Pierce 

Football Manager ------- T. RoWE Price, Jr. 

Basketball Manager - - - - - - . - Edward C. CaRRIS 

Lacrosse Manager ------- NoRRIS C. BaRNARD 

Baseball Manager - - - - - - ' - Harold S. Webster 

Track Manager Edwin M. Bush 

Swimming Manager ------- Howard M. Jenkins 

Soccer Manager . . - Paul M. Hess 

Assistant Football Manager ------ Frank W. Fetter 

Assistant Basketball Manager R. Erdman Wilson 

Assistant Lacrosse Manager Gregg D. REYNOLDS 

Assistant Baseball Manager ----- CLARENCE H. YoDER 

Assistant Track Manager A. Tench Francis 

*In Active Military Service. 

swarthmore college athletic committee 

Representing the Alumni Representing the Faculty 

Charles C. Miller, Chairman John A. Miller 

fT. H. Dudley Perkins E. LeRoy Mercer 

Samuel C. Palmer 

Representing the Athletic Association — Andrew Simpson 



fDied in Service. 



181 




p 



^^earers of tl)e **S" 



Major Sports 
Football 



Charles M. Howell (Acting 

Allison G. Cornog 
William L. Ridpath, Jr. 
Harry A. Olin 
Detlev W. Bronk 
Edmund P. Smith 
Franklin S. Gillespie 
H. Fenimore Baker 
John W. Johnson 
William L. Cornog 
Carl F. Michael 



Captain) 

George Conahey. Jr. 
Arthur W. Gardiner 
Paul W. Chandler 
William P. Carter 
Russell White 
J. Frederick Conway 
William L. Durbin 
A. Frank Fitts 
Frank R. Heavner 

Basketball 



Clarence H. Yoder (Captain) 

John M. Ogden George W 



Charles P, Larkin 



Edward C. Carris (Captain) 

Jess Halsted 
Allison G. Cornog 
C. Paul Nay 
Frederick A. Bouchton 



Place 
William FI. Stow, Tr 



T. RowE Price, Jr. (Manager) 

Charles P. Larkin 
James W. Lukens 
Charles H. Lungren 
William H. Stow, Jr. 
Andrew S. Whittaker 
James D. Clancey 
Alan C. Valentine 
Frank S. Dudley 
Harry E. Walker 
Carl J. Geiges 

Edward C. Carris (Manager) 

James D. Clancey 
Grant E. Benjamin 



Baseball 



Frank O. Ewell 
Leon Henderson 
John M. Ogden 
Clarence H. Yoder 
Samuel B. Webb 



Judson T. Ballard (Manager) 

Howard B. Katzenbach 
Russell White 
William P. Carter 
Charles P. Larkin 



I 

vr 



I 

il! 
I' 



Andrew Simpson (Captain) 

S. Robinson Ogden 
Frederick S. Donnelly 
W. Ralph Gawthrop 
John K. Mealy 
Roland P. Stratton 
Dean C. Widener 
Robert S. Blau 



Ewing T. Corson (Captain) 

Walter W. Maule 
Harry A. Olin 
Charles A. Snyder 
Henry L Hoot 
Allin H. Pierce 



Lacrosse 



Carl D. Pratt 

H. Fenimore Baker 

Franklin P. Buckman 

Drew Pearson 

T. RowE Price, Jr. 

C. Raymond Michener 



David M. Bodine (Manager) 

Clifford R. Gillam 
Francis A. Jenkins 
Earle R. Wheatley 
John G. Albertson 
T. Howard Atkinson 
W. Minton Harvey 
Robert S. Joyce 



Track 



Osborne R. Quayle 
Edmund P. Smith 
Edwin T. Gowdy 
Leonard K. M. Taylor 



Pusey B. Heald (Manager) 

David S. Klauder, Jr. 
C. Waldo Haldeman 
Carroll P. Ford 
Paul W. Chandler 
William P. Kemp 




182 




<:'tmi 



Review of tl)e 191$ Season 

After a long period of uncertainty and delay, the 1918 football team finally got 
away to a flying start and successfully bucked its way through a short but strenuous 
schedule of six games, emerging with four victories to its credit as against two defeats. 
To begin with, the influenza epidemic played havoc with the schedule which had been 
arranged for the team, and game after game had to be cancelled on account of the quar- 
antine. Early in the season. Coach Mercer was so occupied with his duties as contract 
surgeon for the S. A. T. C. that he was able to devote very little time to the team. How- 
ever, in spite of all setbacks, a large squad, including three letter men and several scrubs 
from last year's squad, reported consistently for practice and succeeded in getting into fair 
fighting trim for the opening contest. 

Ursmus was the first victim of the Garnet steam roller and was flattened out to the 
tune of 5 1 to 7. In their initial game, the Quaker forwards were impregnable, and the 
backfield showed a powerful attack. A week later, the team ran up 20 points against 
Pennsylvania and threatened to shut out the Big Quakers. A number of final quarter 
substitutions weakened Swarthmore sufficiently to allow Pennsylvania to score a pair of 
touchdowns. In the Penn game began the series of injuries which gradually wore down 
the strength of the team. Johnny Earp, the brilliant halfback, whose 72-yard run fea- 
tured the game, received an injury to his knee which kept him on the bench for the re- 
mainder of the season. 



18.3 




1918 IFootball 

'^Captain ---.... WiLLIAM L. RlDPATH, Jr. 

Acting Captain - - ' - - - - - - CHARLES M. HoWELL 

Coach ---------- E. LeRoy Mercer 

Manager -------- T. RowE Price, Jr. 

Assistant Manager -------- pRANK W. PetTER 

The Team 
End ......... James D. Clancey 

End ......... Charles M. Howell 

Tackle - - - - - - - - - Charles P. Larkin 

Tackle .......... Prank S. Dudley 

Guard - - - - .- - - - George Conahey, Jr. 

Cuard - ■ - - - ■ - - - - Paul W. Chandler 

Center ......... Harry E. Walker 

Quarterback -------- Arthur W. Gardiner 

Halfback - - - - - - - - William H. Stow, Jr. 

Halfback --------- Russell White 

Fullback --------- William P. Carter 

Substitutes 

William L. Cornog John E. Earp W. Minton Harvey 

Alan C. Valentine William L. Battersby N. Harvey Collisson 

Carl J. Geiges William P. Kemp Warren H. Ogden 

Edwin M. Joseph 

*In Active Military Service. 



1S4 



IThe first football defeat against Swarthmore on the new 
athletic field was tallied by a patched up League Island 
Hr~ 1 Navy Yard team, and was accomplished mainly by the all 

round efforts of one Ben Boynton, a former all-American 
quarterback. With all their "p^p" drained by the Penn 
game, the Garnet players fought a hard, struggling battle 
against the service men, and lost by one touchdown, 6-2. 

Staging a quick comeback, they avenged their defeat by 
shutting out Delaware and scoring 29 points in a game full 
of sensational, brilliant plays. Pard Larkin, the stellar 
tackle, played a most conspicuous part in this victory, suc- 
cessfully usurping every function of line or backfield man. 

Then came the second Penn game, which gave the Uni- 
\ersity a chance to avenge its earlier defeat. It was a worn- 
down Swarthmore team which met the big Quakers, one 
which played as hard but not as well as it had been coached, 
and one which was destined to lose, but which, after all, 
lost only by an illegal touch- 
down made from a fumble. If 
the team was worn down when 
it went into the Pennsylvania 
fracas, it was only a semblance 
of its once powerful self when 
it left Franklin Field. Five 
regulars were so severely injured as to make them unable to 
play in the last game of the season. 

On Thanksgiving day, the weakened Garnet eleven faced 
the husky P. M. C. team at Chester, and after a sixty- 
minute scramble in a drizzling rain on a muddy field, came 
off with a final victory. 

At the beginning of the season, there were six first string 
backfield candidates, Stow, Carter, White, Geiges, Gardi- 
ner, and Earp, between whom there was so little difference 
as to make it difficult to decide which to eliminate in pick- 
ing a backfield. Of these, only Geiges escaped more or 
less serious injury during the season, and in the final game 
only Geiges, Carter, and White were able to play. The 
same line, however, composed of Clancey, Larkin, Conahey, 
Walker, Chandler, Dudley, and Howell, bore the brunt of 
opposing attacks until the final game, when Chandler and 
Howell were unable to play. f ai' howei.i., n 

.\i!tiTiK t'iiptaiii, WIS 




BILL Kllil'Aill. i:x. I'.i 
CaiJtaiii-EleLt, lUlS 




185 



"Bill" Ridpath, captain-elect 
of the 1918 team, was in the 
Naval Reserve and was unable 
to return to college. No one was 
elected to take his place, but 
'Cap" Howell, a hard working 
end, served as acting-captam in 
most of the games. "Pard" 
Larkin, the giant tackle, whose 
work featured every game, was 
elected captain for the 1919 
eleven. His election to the cap- 
taincy in his Sophomore year is a 
unique honor, but it is one which 
comes as a rev/ard to a player who has made an unusual record in Swarthmore football 
history. Larkin has played during two seasons, and has not missed a single second of any 
game during that time. He can do, and has done, anything in the list of football achieve- 






PARD LARKIN, '21 

Captain-Elect, 1919 



186 





6 5 ^pQrt5 





BILL STOW, '21 




JIM CLANCEY. '21 



DOC CORNOG, '19 




387 






NICK CARTEK, '21 



ment: punt, drop kick, forward pass, run the ball, block 
kicks, or intercept forwards. During the last season he was 
selected by several critics as an all-American tackle. 

The 1918 team was a 
typical war-time Mercer- 
coached team, a new team of 
good mdividual football play- 
ers, quickly welded into a 
powerful fighting unit by 
"Doc's" genius as a coach and 
as a leader of fighting men. 

It was a team which perhaps jacked the football ability of 
the veteran teams of former years, but never their fighting 
spirit; a team which a long series of injuries may have de- 
prived of overwhelming victories, but never of the glory of 
its achievement. 



Results of the Schedule 

October 26 — Ursinus at Swarthmore 
November 2 — Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 
November 9 — League Island at Swarthmore 
November 1 6 — Delaware at Swarthmore 
November 23 — Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 
November 28~P. M. C. at Chester - - 

GEORGE CONAHEY, '20 Totals 



s. 


Opp 


51 


7 


20 


12 


2 


6 


29 





7 


13 


7 





116 


38 



188 





&.uji,,r,iid> 



;Bu» 



% I 



i 






n 



il.Jw>.^^A 4...ini 



!!^ask(itball Review 






P.'l!;ifi3='r''v^s:ij 



1 

i 

I 



Judged by its record of victories and defeats, the 1919 
basketball team was not highly successful. At the be- 
ginning of the season, more than forty candidates re- 
sponded to Coach Mercer's call, among them all of last 
year's veterans except Donnelly and Yoder, and a wealth 
of experienced new men besides. It was then that pros- 
pects looked bright for the best Garnet basketball team 
in years. 

That the team lost six games out of eleven, that it 
remained on a dead level, showing little if any improve- 
ment from the beginning of the season to the end, may be 
ascribed to one thing, a constant shifting of the lineup, 
due to a number of unavoidable causes. The team 
which started the opening contest was a Sophomore team 
composed of Place, Carter, Stow, Clancey, and Larkin. 
Before the season had progressed far, Benjamin showed 
so much improvement that he displaced Carter in the 
lineup. With this combination, the team won from P. 
M. C. and Ursinus, and lost to the Navy and Princeton. 
Stow suffered a sprained ankle in the Ursinus game 




DUTCH YdDKR. '211 
Cailtiliil, lOlil 



189 




1919 :^a5ketball 

Captain .......... CLARENCE H. YoDER 

Coach - - E. LeRoy Mercer 

Manager - - - - - - - - - Edward C. Carris 

Assistant Manager ------- R. Erdman Wilson 

The Team 

Forward -.------. Clarence H. Yoder 

Forward George W. Place 

Center William H. Stow, Jr. 

Guard - - James D. Clancey 

Guard - Charles P. Larkin 

Substitute .-.--.-. Grant E. Benjamin 

Substitute - - - - William P. Carter 

Substitute William P. Kemp 

Substitute Warren H. Ogden 

Substitute Alan C. Valentine 



190 



which kept him out of the Army game. Despite the handicap of his absence, the Garnet 
passers held to the good old Quaker custom of defeating the cadets. Captain "Dutch" 
Yoder returned from Camp Grant just in time to break into the lineup for a few minules 
in the first Penn game. The acquisition of Yoder balanced the loss of Stow who with- 
drew for the remainder of the season because of ineligibility. 

For the remainder of the season, the personnel of the team was constantly changing 
due to the illness of different players at various times. Victories were tallied against Dela- 
ware and Dickinson, while defeats were registered against the Garnet in the last three 
games of the season by Rutgers, Lafayette, and Pennsylvania. 

The 1919 team was a good team ; the only real regret that can be felt is that it 
did not greatly improve as the season progressed. The only defeat which approached 
the dimensions of a disaster was that administered by the Navy. That the Big Quakers, 
the unbeatable Intercollegiate champions, twice doubled the score on the Little Quakers 
is little cause for shame. On the other hand, Swarthmore's victories over the Army and 
Delaware were in the nature of notable achievements. 

The succeeding season bears a promise of better things, for not one of this year's 
team will be lost by graduation. 





PAKD I..\r!KI.\'. 21 



GIOORGE PLACE. '21 



191 



January 


10 


January 


18- 


January 


24- 


February 


7- 


February 


8- 


February 


15- 


February 2 1 - 


February 22- 


February 


28- 


March 


1- 


March 


5- 



Results of the Schedule 

-Pennsylvania Military College at Chester 
-Navy at Annapolis - - - . 

-Princeton at Princeton - - - - 

-Ursinus at Swarthmore ... 

-Army at West Point - - - - 

-Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 
-Delaware at Swarthmore . . _ 

-Dickinson at Swarthmore - . . 

-Rutgers at New Brunswick - . - 

-Lafayette at Easton ... 

-Pennsylvania at Philadelphia . - . 



Totals 



s. 


Opp 


22 


6 


16 


43 


18 


24 


32 


29 


20 


19 


14 


31 


26 


22 


49 


30 


19 


29 


18 


26 


16 


30 


250 


289 




LIEIT. IIAIKILD SMITH. '17 
1 the A. E. F. Basketball Cliauips 



192 




t-w^. 







,#^^ ^^asc..^ 




ii'VA/ % 



4J'/^*- 



,.J4 fe... 



i^^::! 



1/ I § 






Of all the spring sports, baseball was the most fortunate 
in being, at the beginning of the season, very little affected 
by the War. Captain Carris, Ogden, Cornog, Ewell, 
Nay, and Boughton were the veterans on hand, and Coach 
Bettger had no difficulty in filling the open positions with 
three Freshmen, Carter, White, and Webb. Nay, Car- 
nog, and Ewell were later called into the service, but by 
that time Larkin, Katzenback, and Yoder had been well 
groomed to take their places. 

The 1918 season was the third and last in which the 
famous Ogden-Carris battery was to win games for Swarth- 
more, and win games it did. "Jawn" and "Eddie" hard- 
ly needed the support of the rest of the team, but always 
found it forthcoming when they did need it. Furthermore, 
while the Ogden-Carris combine was holding opposing 
teams to zero scores, the Garnet batsmiths were slamming 
out numerous runs to raise Swarthmore's total. 

Out of the seven games played, only two were lost. It 
is a particularly irritating fact that both of those were lost 
to Pennsylvania. The first Penn game was the opening 




EDDIE CARRIS. '19 
Captain 1918 and 1919 



193 






1 

K-JHHi MdSa-. )»$^^i r~lUi^L^* 

1918 ^^aseball 

Captain EdwaRD C. CaRRIS 

Coach - - - - Franklin L. Bettger 

'^Manager Jess HalsTED 

Acting Manager JUDSON T. Ballard 

Assistant Manager HaROLD S. Webster 

The Team 

Pitcher John M. Ogden 

Pitcher Charles P. Larkin 

Catcher ...----- Edward C. CaRRIS 

First Base . . - Samuel B. Webb 

Second Base .--.--- ALLISON G. CoRNOG 

Third Base Russell White 

Shortstop Frank O. Ewell 

Left Field - - - FrED A. BoUGHTON 

Center Field WiLLIAM P. CARTER 

Right Field --------- C. Paul Nay 

Second Base - CLARENCE H. YoDER 

Shortstop Howard B. Katzenbach 

Substitutes 

C. Singleton Mears Joseph J. Pugh 

George A. Powell 

*In Active Military Service. 



194 




contest for Swarthmore, and was an air-tight battle which lasted fourteen innings before 
the ice was broken by Hobey Light's husky swat. The second loss was the Commence- 
ment Day game, and carried with it the blighting humiliation of having the "old grads" 
see the Red and Blue slam out 
seven runs against two for the 
Garnet. 

Columbia put up a game fight, 
but was beaten by a 3 to 2 score. 
Then the Navy, Lehigh, Dela- 
ware, and New York University, 
in close succession, were victims 
of the prowess of Ogden's arm 
by the shut-out route. The coat 
of whitewash administered to the 
"Middies "who had not been shut 
out since time immemorial, was the 
biggest triumph of a successful 
season. 

A veteran team, among them 
Carris, who was re-elected cap- 
tain, is left for the 1919 season. 




195 




Results of the Schedule 



S. Opp. 



April 6 — Pennsylvania at Philadelphia . . . . _ 

April I 7 — Columbia at New York ------ 

April 24 — Navy at Annapolis - - 

May 1 — Lehigh at South Bethlehem ----- 

May 4 — Delaware at Swarthmore ------ 

May 8 — New York University at New York - - - - 

May 1 8 — Pennsylvania at Swarthmore - - - - - 

Totals 24 10 






1 


3 


2 


5 





3 





6 





5 





2 


7 





19G 




*jM:iiii^cK'^'^VA^:' 




" ;$i 


%: 


i}' 








s 


'& 


i 


ir" 




# 



'^■^ 



Ite^jeSt'' 



,..iS*- 



ai'S?5! 



^^^^ 



^^^^ S^i^ 










Orack Review 



The 1918 track team was leaderless but victorious. 
"Wait" Maule was first elected to captain Dr. Mercer's 
cinder-patii atiiletes, but was lost to Uncle Sam before the 
season started. The captamcy was then bestowed on ''Stuge" 
Corson, who participated in one meet only before he re- 
ceived his call to Naval Aviation. Under "Doc's" com- 
petent coaching, however, the team was successful in spite 
of the loss of these veterans, and scored victories m three 
dual meets out of four, besides making a creditable show- 
ing in the big Middle States Intercollegiates. 

The season opened auspiciously with an easy victory over 
Johns Hopkins, whose supremacy in the field events and 
hurdles failed to balance the Garnet victories in the runs. 
At the Penn Relays a week later. Chandler, the Freshman 
weight star, was entered in the pentathlon, but failed to 
qualify for the finals. Swarthmore's relay team running in 
the Middle Atlantic States Championship Race won a close 
second. Delaware and Haverford both fell easy victims 
before the prowess of the Garnet runners. 

In the Middle States Intercollegiates, Swarthmore was 
outpointed by Bruce's big Lafayette team, but won second 
place in the meet by a wide margin. 




AI. I'lEUCE. '19 
Ciiptiiiii, ini9 



197 




CHARLEY HALDEMAN, '211 



I'.ILI, KEMP. 'L'l 



DAVE KLAUDER, '20 



The only conspicuous weakness of the 1918 team lay in its lack of hurdlers. Its 
main strength lay in the consistency with which Klauder, in the sprints. Ford in the quar- 
ter mile and high jump. Pierce in the two mile, and Chandler in the weight events, tal- 
lied points for the Garnet. Chandler never failed to score with the shot, discus and 
javelm, and was the high point scorer in the Middle States Intercollegiates, winning two 
firsts and a second. Al Pierce, captain-elect of the 1919 team, easily won the two mile 
race in every meet. 

Results of the Schedule 

April 27 — Middle Atlantic States Championship Race at Penn Relays 

First — Lafayette. Second — Swarthmore. Third — Dickinson 

Pierce, Quayle, Cornog, Ford; Bressler (alternate) 

April 20 — Johns Hopkins, at Swarthmore - . - - . 

May I — Rutgers, at Swarthmore . - . . - 

May 4 — Delaware, at Newark - - - - - 

May 8 — Haverford, at Swarthmore - ... - 



s. 


Opp 


63 


46 


53 


67 


68 


49 


68 


36 



Totals 



252 198 



May 1 8 — Middle Atlantic States Intercollegiates, 

First — Lafayette ..--.-- 

Second — Swarthmore --.... 
Third — Deleware - - - - - - 



at Easton 



45 

301/2 
17 



198 




1918 Orack 



'^Captain ....... 

^Captain -------- 

Coach -------- 

Manager -------- 

Assislanl Manager ------ 

The Team 
Those scoring ten points are granted Varsity letters. 

EwiNG T. Corson 

Allin H. Pierce 

PusEY B. Heald 

Osborne R. Quayle - - - 

Edwin T. Gowdy 

Leonard K. M. Taylor 

David S. Klauder, Jr. .... 

C. Waldo Haldeman, Jr. .... 

Carroll P. Ford 

Paul W. Chandler 

William P. Kemp 

William L. Cornog 



Walter W. Maule 

EwiNG T. Corson 

E. LeRoy Mercer 

PusEY B. Heald 

Edwin M. Bush 



Frank W. Fetter 
J. Minshall Holden 
Charles W. Wassman, Jr. 

*In Active Military Service. 



Points Won 

- 3 
30 

- 19 
25 

- 11 
16 

- 38 
24 

- 33 
45 

- 32 

1 



George Conahey, Jr. 3 



8 
6 
3 



199 




1918 lacrosse 

'^Captain ..-..--.. Samuel R. OgdeN 

Acting Capla'm -------- ANDREW SiMPSON 

Coach --------- E. LeRoy Mercer 

Manager - - - - David M. Bodine 

Assistant Manager NoRRlS C. Barnard 

The Team 

Coal NoRRis C. Barnard 

Inside Home - JoHN G. Albertson 

Outside Home - - - - - - - - AnDREW SimpsON 

First Attack --------- RoBERT S. JoYCE 

Second Attack - - ARTHUR W. GaRDINER 

Third Attack - - C. RAYMOND MiCHENER 

Center - . - T. HOV/ARD ATKINSON 

Third Defense ------- CLIFFORD R. GiLLAM 

Second Defense --------- Carl D. Pratt 

First Defense - - W. MiNTON Harvey 

Cover Point - - - - - ' - - - RoBERT S. Blau 

Point --------- Dean C. Widener 

Inside Home -------- T. RowE Price, Jr. 



*In Active jNIilitary Service. 



200 





■ AT' 


■■ 


m 




-»fflS!-.:Eijii( 






K.^^^^^*-v 






^..»-.*- s . 





Cacrosse Review 

When Dr. Mercer added to his springtime burdens by taking charge of the 1918 
lacrosse squad, he gave utterance to the calm confidence so typical of the man by saying, 
"We haven't got a lacrosse team now, but we're going to have one soon." The first part 
of his statement none doubted, because it was lamentably self-evident. Only two letter 
men were out for the team and the remainder of the squad was weak and inexperienced. 



S-^-'-i^S^ 




A.VIJY SIMPSON, 'in 
Captain 1!I1K iinil 101!) 



.\KT CAlilllXKK. 'ai 



NOHHI.'; RARN.Mil), '19 
Milliliter, 1(110 



201 




JACK ALBEETSON, '20 




ea^s;^ 





CLIFF GII.LAM, '20 



T. H. ATKINSON. '20 



The results of the first lour games were anything but encouraging for they talhed naught 
but goose eggs for Swarthmore, ■while the Navy, Lehigh, Pennsylvania, and Hopkins were 
credited with substantial scores. These games were ail played in hostile territory. 

The first appearance of the team on the home grounds was the occasion for the first 
indication that Coach Mercer had infused enough skill and aggressiveness into it to make 
true his statement, "We're going to have one." Pennsylvania was defeated by one point 
after a hard battle. Two days later Yale came to Swarthmore and left with nothing 
but the small end of a 6-0 score. The last game of the season resulted in a victory over 
Stevens. Dr. Mercer's prophecy had come true with a vengeance. We had a team. 
While the Garnet stickmen had lost more games than they had won, according to the old 
adage, "He who laughs last laughs best," they had every reason to be happy. 

One of the best features of the team was that only three players were lost through 
graduation, leaving a strong squad to stage a comeback for lacrosse, which has been a 
waning sport at Swarthmore for the last few years. Captain Simpson was elected to lead 
the team for another season. 

Results of the Schedule 
April 6 — Navy, at Annapolis ------- 

April 1 3 — Lehigh, at South Bethlehem . . - _ . 

April 1 6 — Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia ----- 

April 20 — Johns Hopkins, at Baltimore ----- 

April 25 — Pennsylvania, at Swarthmore - . . - . 

April 27 — Yale, at Swarthmore --.._. 
May 4 — Stevens, at Hoboken ----.. 



S. 


Opp. 





2 





3 





I 





5 


2 


1 


6 





5 


1 



Totals 



13 13 



202 




203 
















1919 Swimmmg 

Captain GILBERT E. ToMLINSON 

Manager Howard M. Jenkins 

The Team 

And Summary of Points Scored 

Albert W. Kelsey ..- 15 

Charles W. Wassman - - - - - - - - - 12 

Thomas H. Atkinson .-.------ 12 

Howard M. Jenkins - - -- - - - - - -9 

Ernest M. Bliss -._------- 6 

Gilbert E. Tomlinson --------- 4 

T. Sherman McAllister . . - 4 

George B. Jackson ---------- 1 

Thomas F. Bonsall ..---_--. 1 



204 



Review of tl)e Season 



Swimming could not be called a huge success this year if the record of three 
defeats and one victory alone be considered. Great credit is due, however, to the 
members of the team for their efforts to keep Swarthmore on the swimming map, 
for the outlook at the beginning of the season was quite discouraging. With the 
exception of Atkinson, Wassman, and Jenkins, the team was composed entirely of 
new men, who show great promise for next season. The team had no coach, so 
what success it had can be attributed to hard practice and continued interest. 

The relay team, composed of Kelsey, Joyce, Jenkins, and Atkinson, although 
not exceptionally fast, did good work. Kelsey swam the one hundred and two 
hundred yard dashes. Wassman performed well from the springboard in the 
fancy diving event, Kelsey also doing good work. Atkinson and Manager Jenkins 
did some fast work in the sprints. In the plunge. Bliss and McAllister did well, 
considering that they were new at the game. Captain Tomlinson returned from the 
service at mid-season and took part in two meets, showing flashes of his old time 
speed. 

Swimming is a rapidly growing sport in inter-collegiate athletics, and its fu- 
ture at Swarthmore appears most promising. 

The Results of the Schedule 

February 8 — Mercersburg, at Mercersburg ... 

February 22 — Rutgers, at New Brunswick ... 
March I — Johns Hopkins, at Swarthmore ... 

March 8 — Lehigh, at Swarthmore .... 



S. 


Opp 


17 


44 


11 


42 


22. 


49 


27 


25 



20.5 




1918 Oennis 



The Tennis team, under the direction of Captain D. A. Landis, carried through a 
very successful season in the spring of 1918. In view of the fact that no 'Varsity men 
returned and that the season was unusually short, great credit is due the captain and the 
men for turning out one of Swarthmore's best tennis teams. The entire schedule was 
played in less than a month, so that when the last match was played the team had just 
about found its stride. During the entire season only one match in the doubles was lost. 
Brown and Dudley formed the first doubles, while the Landis brothers worked together 
in the other duet. 

The Results of the Schedule 

April 24— P. M. C, at Chester ------ 

April 27 — Franklin and Marshall, at Lancaster - - * - 

April 30 — University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia 

May 3 — Haverford, at Haverford ------ 

May 4 — Delaware, at Newark ------ 



s. 


Opp 


5 





4 


2 


3 


3 


5 


1 


4 






The Team \){/q 

D. A. Landis, Capt. 7 

Dudley -8 

Brown --..-. .....g 

H. H. Landis - . - 7 

-Mears ------ 2 

The Landis brothers. Brown, and Dudley received their letters. 



Lost 
2 
1 
1 

2 
1 



206 



u 



DOC" 



Prominent among those to whom recogni- 
tion is due for making our Alma Mater 
what she is to-day stands E. LeRoy Mer- 
cer, the coach, the physician, the man. 

Everyone who knows Swarthmore knows 
the story of Doctor Mercer's briUiant ath- 
letic career. At George School, he was a 
stellar schoolboy champion, holding for a 
time the interscholastic pole-vault record. 
Later, at the University of Pennsylvania, he 
won fame in both football and track, and 
became known as the best all-round athlete 
who had ever attended the University. He 
was a member of the Freshman football and track teams and of the 'Varsity foot- 
ball and track teams for three years. He was ail-American fullback and captain 
of the Penn football team for two years, and a consistent winner in inter-collegiate 
track meets. His records at the inter-collegiates won a place for him on the Amer- 
ican Olympic team of 1912. After graduation from Penn, he remained there one 
year coaching the Freshman football team. 

Such, in brief, is "Doc's" record before coming to the college with which he 
is now inseparably allied. Each year he has rapidly become more and more an 
integral part of this little Quaker institution. During his first three years here he 
was Men's Physical Director, Track Coach, and Assistant Football Coach, and 
was very successful in each capacity. However, it was the unsettled war time con- 




207 



^ 






dition of sports during the last two years which brought him forth as the "man of 
the hour" and the savior of Swarthmore's athletics. He was first made Football 
Coach and from green material turned out two of the most successful teams which 
have ever worn the Garnet. Then he was called upon to coach lacrosse in a season 
when his time was largely occupied by track. Notwithstanding the fact that he had 
had little lacrosse experience, he developed in a limited time and from the weakest 
material which ever turned out for a 'Varsity team, a lineup which ended the sea- 
son victoriously. The latest athletic responsibility that has been thrust upon his 
shoulders is the position of Basketball Coach. 

His unbounded success as a coach is due to two qualities, ability and leader- 
ship. His leadership is attributable to his understanding of men, his unfailing good 
nature, his unassuming modesty, and his calm confidence. 

It is not alone by his successful development of athletic teams that "Doc" has 
earned the gratitude of Swarthmoreans. When a unit of the Students' Army Train- 
ing Corps was established here, he became the Contract Surgeon for the Swarth- 
more unit, and served in this capacity during the epidemic of Spanish influenza. 
Due to his wise precautions and constant care, very few cases of the disease were 
contracted at the college, none of them fatal. Many lives were doubtless saved 



208 





by his efficient handling of this situation, as well as that of the smallpox scare in 
the winter with the attendant wholesale vaccinations. 

"Doc" has many positions to fill, but he is a big enough man to fill them all. 
He faces each new responsibility with quiet confidence and undaunted courage. 
Under his tutelage Swarthmore's representatives in four sports have kept the Garnet 
flag flying high. By his watchfulness, the health of the student body has been safe- 
guarded. He is an ideal type of morally, mentally, and physically clean-cut Amer- 
ican manhood, to whom every Swarthmorean is glad to pay tribute. 



Cugenc-ic JDoc" 

Down at Swarthmore, I am told, 
Roy Mercer's the whole show ; 

Man, he's into everything. 
Everlasting on the go, — 
Runs every team about the place; 
Can vaccinate them all. 
Everything is in his hne. 
Ragtime, or just football. 



209 



THIS PAGE IS THE FIRST INSTALMENT 
OF THE HALCYON WASTE BASKET 

(We sincerely beg the forgiveness of the two distinguished personages at the bot- 
tom of the waste basket). 



«foot -trails l)evl5m 



All was quiet. A flivver crashed madly over the pebbles as it crawled along. The 
sky was lit with the dazzling paleness of the setting moon. Judd waved his arms motion- 
lessly to the silent cheerers, who were deafeningly yelling thunders of inaudible whispers. 
Even the Garnet pennants of vivid purple, frantically waving in the terrific gale of the 
calm afternoon, were not stirring. To the west the Crum reflected the glow of the dark 
village as it roared quietly in a frenzy of sluggishness. Not a sound came from the vast 
mob that was echoing the pandemonium of a peaceful riot. A million voices were blended 
in one whisper to the sky beneath. And out of the crowded vacancy, a gigantic figure 
of minute proportions stepped forth, bearing on his chest the scarcely visible legend in 
flaming letters, "No beer, no work." 





210 



a 



\n 



r? 



T^ 



r. 






Ljij 




211 




XiTomea's ^tl^letic (Touncil 

/ 

Officers for I9I8-I9I9 . 

President - - - - - - - DOROTHEA DARLINGTON 

Vice President - LuCY LiPPINCOTT 

Secretary) Elizabeth Atherholt 

Treasurer Frances Hause 

Athletic Council 

Mary Vernam Helen Culin 

Frances Williams Helen Biddle 

Isabel Myers Katherine Donnelly 

Manager of Varsit]] Teams - - , - - ' - DOROTHEA Darlington 



212 



^ '^or6 of Appreciation 



Any account of girls' athletics at 
Swarthmore College for the season of 
1918 and 1919 would be wholly in- 
adequate if Miss Helen Culin, Head of 
the Department of Physical Education 
for Women, and her assistant, Miss 
Florence Rose, were not mentioned. 
Never before have we had so much 
"pep," sucti good organization, better 
attendance at classesy^ames, and meets, 
or better "sporty" times in general. 

Two things we have to report as ab- 
solutely new; first, a hockey held, on 
the East front Campus. Little did we 
dream when we saw the mower and 





MISS iii:i.i:x 



leveler working that we were to have another hockey 
field, but we really needed it and the Sophs and 
Freshmen exhibited their talent and trusty arms to 
great advantage. 

The other entirely new institution is a basketball 
team that may travel. They can travel, too, and come 
home crowned with glory. Swarthmore will surely be- 
come more and more famous when its teams become 
known in other places. For these" two innovations in 
particular, for the great fun we've had, for her un- 
failing interest in athletic affairs and for high hopes 
we have for the future of Swarthmore athletics, we 
thank Miss Culin. 



MI.SS FLOKKNCB M, EOSB 



213 




Varsity HfocKey 



The Team 

Captain ... . Mary Vernam 

Center Forward - - • Frances Williams 

Right Inside - - ------ CHARLOTTE GrIFFEN 

Ri%ht Wing -------- - Helen Ramsey 

Left Inside .....--. Grace Gourley 

Left Wing --------- Helen Biddle 

Center Halfback - DOROTHEA Darlington 

Right Halfback Mary Vernam 

Left Halfback - - - - - - - - Hannah Eavenson 

Right Fullback ------- Esther Newcomer 

Left Fullback Ethel Kaplan 

Coal --------- Eleanor Atkinson 

Substitutes 

Ruth Orndorff Josephine Griffiths 

Katherine Fahnestock 



Results of the Schedule 



Beechwood 
Penn Hall 
Temple College 



S. Opp. 

3 2 

3 2 
6 1 



(All games played on home field). 



12 



Hi 



Ol)i5 gear's ^focKey Season — anb 4^ro5pects 



The 'Varsity Hockey Team has lived up to 
the prophecy of last year's fans. It has a slate 
on which are written only victories — those over 
Beechwood, Penn Hall, and Temple College. 
But we really expected this fine record all along, 
because our last year's Juniors, being the Class 
champions, were still with us, the Sophomore 
and Junior backers were on the job, and with 
the class of '22 came in some splendid material 
in the persons of Charlotte Griffen and Grace 
Gourley. 



a.-i./?^ 





MARY VERNAM. '19 
Captain, 1918 



The games were never so well attended. A 
good peppy bunch came down to cheer and sing 
on every occasion, and "Vernam's mighty 
stroke," that they sung about, was unfailing. 

The right wing, Helen Ramsey, has been 
elected to succeed Mary Vernam as Captain. 
Here's wishing her all the good fortune that this 
year's team has had, all the support they en- 
joyed, and all the luck they'll ever need ! 



Jli.J.L.S l;A.\l.-.j,i, 
Captain-KIect, ISiy 



215 




"Interclass U'fockeY 



It was almost to be expected — this championship stuff that was staged by the Class 
of 1919. They had done the same trick in their Junior year, and their playing this sea- 
son warranted the expectations that they would do it again in their Senior year. They 
didn't lose a game; the nearest they came to such a disaster was in the contest with the 
] 920 team, which placed second in the interclass competition. 

Members of the Teams 



Seniors 
Juniors 
Sophomores 
Freshmen 



Seniors 


Juniors 




Esther Newcomer (Captain) 




Frances Hause 




Josephine Griffiths 




Lucy Lippincott 




Fr.ances Willi.^ms 




Mary Campbell 




Katherine Fahnestock 




Charlotte Bunting 




Helen Biddle 




Edna Evans 




Mary Vernam 




Sarah Mayhew 




Isabel Myers 




Dorothy Paxson 




Eleanor Atkinson 




Anna Williams 




Edith Young 




Helen Ramsey 




Eleanor Runk 




Marguerite Coles 




Sophomores 


Freshmen 




Hannah Eavenson 




Charlotte Griffen 




Frances Miller 




Grace Gourley 




Helen Samuel 




Margaret Culin 




Janet Clark 




Helen Thorne 




Ethel Kaplan 




Anna Heafford 




Eleanor Green 




Elsie Smith 




Margaret Embery 




Dorothy'" Nassau 




Catherine Rhoads 




Ruth Thompson 




Janet Young 




Helen Horner 




Virginia Way 




Marjorie Fell 




Helen Griscom 




Alline Jones 
Elsa Palmer 
Elizabeth Walters 




Standing of 


THE Teams 


Won 


Lost 


..... 


- 


3 
- 2 




1 


..... 


- 


1 

. 1 


2 
2 



216 




Varsity basketball 

Fornmrd _-.----- Marjorie Kistler, '21 

Forward --------- Elsa Palmer, '22 

Cenler --------- FRANCES WiLLIAMS, ' 19 

Side Center ------- Anna Heafford, '22 

Cuard -------- Mary Vernam (Capt.),'19 

Cuard ------- Dorothea Darlington, '19 

Subslitutes 

Charlotte Griffen, '22 Eleanor Atkinson, '19 

Evelyn Wick, '21 



Results of the Schedule 



January 


5- 


— Temple College 


January 


24- 


— Beechwood 


February 


18- 


— Lansdowne Sigma 


February 28— 


-Penn Hall 


March 


1- 


-Hood College 


March 


5- 


—Kensington 


March 


7- 


-Temple College 


March 


13- 


—Alumnae 


March 


15- 


-Penn Hall 



S. 


Opp 


21 


24 


21 


9 


15 


38 


24 


23 


31 


25 


52 


17 


13 


11 


21 


9 


26 


18 



224 1 74 



217 



^ brilliant basketball Season 

The second game with Penn Hall, on March 13, 1919, ended a season of basket- 
ball of which everyone may be proud. Our nucleus of Vernam and Williams, with Dot 
Darlmgton, "Marj." Kistler, and the two peppy Freshmen, in the live personages of 
Elsa Palmer and Anna Heafford, are the people we have to thank. 

Out of the nine games played — and nine stiff ones they were — seven were victories. 
The two defeats we had to suffer were handed out by Temple College and Lansdowne 
Sigma, both teams composed of ex-varsity people, gym teachers and team coaches. These 
games were played very early in the season, and our recent victories have buried all 
memory of defeats. 

To our five successes on the home floor, we may add two others, gathered at Penn 
Hall and Hood College — for our team went on a trip! The explicit purpose was to 
trim the enemy, and they did. Royal receptions awaited them everywhere, but in re- 
turn the team simply gave out one trouncing after another. It is generally agreed that 
next year we should make a regular tour and keep up the same record on all foreign soil. 

Speed, team-work and accuracy helped us pile up our points to the number of 224, 
while our opponents totaled I 74. 

When the class of 1919 leaves, we lose three players — good all-round athletes — 
but with "Marj." Kistler as next year's Captain and the good support of Anna Heafford 
and Elsa Palmer our future is bright with hopes, and next year — we'll be saying — bright 
with success. 






"MARJ" KISTLEB. '21 
Captain-Elect, 1920 



ELSA PALMER, '22 



DOROTHEA DARLINGTON. '19 
Manager of the Teams 



218 




Unterclass basketball 



Our athletic Seniors again find themselves at the top of the list in the interclass basket- 
ball. Some of the most exciting games of the year were those played against the other 
classes of girls of our own sort, with the same coaching and the same spirit. All games 
were well attended, and the Freshmen rejoiced greatly over their single victory. The Sopho- 
mores played exceptionally fast and well, which made them victors over all except the 
Seniors. The standing of the teams follows: 



Results 

Won Lost 

Seniors ._...------30 

Sophomores .-..------ I I 

Freshmen -....------ \ I 

Juniors -----------03 



219 







X^inners of tl)e ^e6al 

Hockey Basketball 

Eleanor Atkinson, M9 Eleanor Atkinson, '19 

Helen Biddle, '19 Dorothea Darlington, '19 

Katherine Fahnestock, '19 Mary Vernam, '19 

Esther Newcomer, '19 Frances Williams, '19 

Mary Vernam, '19 Marjorie Kistler, '21 

Frances Williams, '19 Charlotte Griffen, '22 

Helen Ramsey, '20 Anna Heafford, '22 

Hannah Eavenson, '21 Elsa Palmer, '22 
Ethel Kaplan, '21 
Grace Gourley, '22 
Charlotte Griffen, '22 

The wearers of the medals for the other sports — the gym meets, swimming teams, 
and the winners of the cups for tennis, were still to be decided when the Halcyon went 
to press. After spring vacation all these events were played off and some more proud and 
happy athletes were added to the already noble company. 

The Freshmen, however, have had an opportunity to hold their gym meet. In 
many cases the work was so well done that it seemed impossible to decide the winner, 
but after much consultation the honors were awarded as follows: 

Freshmen Gym Team 

First Place --------- Anna Heafford 

Second Place - - - Elsa Palmer 

Third Place --------- DoROTHY Nassau 



220 





Su 



rapnels 




V-A--^ 



SHRAPNELS 



THIS IS THE 



I 

Z 





I 

G 

i 

z 



SECTION 



Note — But for the fact that Bee Whiteside had aheady dra^s-n the 
picture j'ou have just passed over of the beautiful and buggy bursting 
bomb, we would have entitled this part of Our Book, the Scrap Section, 
and devotedly dedicated it to Doc Miller. 

Note No. 2 — Speaking of Doc Miller, see page 235, Item 22 for 
comment. 



^ ^ 



221 



^-^^ 



r 



Swartl)more (ToUege Cvening bulletin 

(Reprinted at the special request of Prex3-) 

DEGREES 

B. V. D. - - - - - - - Majors in track and lacrosse 

S. A. T. C. - - - - - - - - Majors in the army 

C. O. D. - Conferred on Duns who have paid for at least two make-up exams. 
S. W. A. K. _.-.--- Graduate work in fussing 
F. H. B. - - - - - - Successful survivors of college food 

COURSES OFFERED FOR NEXT YEAR 

English (a) Gorham. 

The Novel from the "Founding of Jerusalem to the Time of Homer." Not given 
1918-1919 (nor any other time, but it looks good in the calalogue). 

(b) Goddard. 

Practice in writing excuses for absence blanks. 

(c) Goddard. 

Social ideals in contemporary Snappy Stories and La Pansienne. (Open only to 
students obtaining a grade of D or E in course b). 

(d) Burrill. 
Melodrama. 

Publish Speaking — Drew Pearson. 

Persuasive speaking with your mouth full of prunes, with special emphasis on methods 
of making professors remove overcuts. 

French — Restaurant French. One hour every now and then. Laboratory whenever cash 
is available. 

German — Collected alibis of Wm. Hohenzollern. 

History — Hull (Special cablegrams from France). 
War Aims of the Bolsheviki. 

Political Science— E. Z. Palmer A. B. C. D. P. D. Q. 

Government of England, Timbuctoo, and Media, including student government and 
the Brookshevik pamphlets. 

Religion — Ducky. Why Gott lost the war. 

Biology — Palmer (a) Pussy Catology. 

Trotter (b) — Research into the uses of genus Plattsburgis graduatis lieutenants sec- 
ond in the past war. 

Chemistry — Alleman. Organic cussing. (Prerequisite, Bible). 

Engineering — Shoplifting and Forgery. 

Mathematics — Fussing with E. B. Miller. 

Physical Ed. — Mental Gymnastics. (Purely in the mind) — Mercer. Culin — Modern 
Vaudeville. 



1 

z 

D 



» ^ 



r 
z 






I 



Ifow 1>v. !5llillcr OelU Obem 







Kappa Sigs - 
Phi Psis 
Delta Gammas 
Pi Phis - 
Kappas 
Thetas 
Chi Omegas 
Alpha Theta Pis 



. . . - - Corduroy trousers 

Norfolk coat and army trousers. Jockey effect 

Bobbed hair and brown and white sneaks 

Ear puffs and engagement rings 

Ruffles and straw hats in January 

Sweaters and tarns, accompanied by air of noblesse oblige 

Coiffure a la Washburn 
Type not fully developed 




^ ^ g^ ^ ^ 



223 



^-A-^^ 



HALCYON 




The Stupid Army Training Corps 

A dignified organization which included many who wished to do their, bit without 
danger. Membership in this, Swarthmore's most democratic fraternity, cairitd with it 
several privileges: first, to arise any time before six every morning; second, to go unpre- 
pared to classes; third, to masquerade as a real soldier; fourth, to draw sixty dollars 
bonus; and fifth, to tell about how things were done "when I was in the army." 

A valuable course in the science of doing as you are told, which should be made 
a part of our curriculum, and might well be offered to both sexes. Its benefits are also 
physical, as contact with the cold earth in the gray dawn is found to remove that "can't 
eat this rotten breakfast" feeling, and that tendency to sleep through the first hour. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 1919-20 



1919 



Tenth Month 7 — Third day 
Tenth Month 25 — Seventh day 
Eleventh Month 2 — Third day 
Twelfth Month 2 — Third day 

First Month 1 3 — Third day 
Third Month 9— Third day 
Sixth Month 4 — Sixth day 



1920 



Meeting of Board of Managers 

Flounder's Day 

Meeting of the Board of Managers 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

Meeting of Board of Managers 

Meeting of Bored Managers 

Meeting of Board of Managers 



1 



7 

/ 

a 



I 
z 

D 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Boyd Janney Brown, President 

Term perspires hot month 1 942 



Lou LiPPINCOTT 

Helen Biddle 
Betty Miller 



Paul Sharpless 
Phebe Seaman 
Betty Walters 



FACTS ABOUT THE FACULTY 

Dr. Wm. L Hull has written a new book entitled, "Ten Thousand Leagues Over the 

Sea." 
Some Freshmen seem to grieve over the fact that "Dr. Brooks is such a Red, Cross, 

Affair. 
J. R. Hayes has published a poem, his masterpiece, entitled, "How Can One Dream 

While the Library Chimes?" 
Dr. Urdahl is the originator of the famous doctrine, "The moral weakness of fussing is 

as degenerating as liquor." 
Dr. Miller has written a humorous treatise called, "From a Professor's Scrapbook." 
E. B. Miller — Young, unmarried, eligible — and anxious. 
Joseph E. Swain — Swarthmore's silver-tongued and tongue-tied orator. 




224 



SHRAPNELS 




I 

z 



!^ob5 



I 

Z 




The Delta Gammas cut their hair. 
Oh what a tragedy was that. 

For now, because their head is bare. 
They find they can't keep on a hat. 



But when the midyear marks come in. 
To their dehght, all A's they find,. 

And they, o'er all the others win. 

For they have nothing on their mind. 




225 



r 

7 



BUILDINGS 

Parrish Hall — A gigantic aeroplane with propellers to right and left of center, a gas tank 
in the middle, a kitchen in the tail, girls in the wings, and the Dean of Women the 
chief passenger. It is run by Alma Motor. 

The Library — Ssssh! 

Wharlon Hall — Formerly a haven of refuge from profs and women, the sanctity of which 
was recently invaded in two sections by the co-eds. A place to smoke but not to 
study. The former is done openly only in the men's sections. The latter is regarded 
as a breach of etiquette m Wharton, with the exception of that phase of Bible Study 
which involves chiefly the names of Biblical individuals. These outbreaks occur fre- 
quently, but are discouraged by Prudent Misgovernment, otherwise known as "Dr. 
Newport's Favorite Goat Feather." Wharton Hall encloses an amphitheater called 
the quandrangle, which served during war time as a scene for physical torture, but 
which has now been rented to Carter, Benjamin, Wiese & Co., a branch of Keith's 
Circuit. 

Wm. ]. Hall Cymnasium — This venerable building is intended for practice of the 
Terpsichorean art. For this purpose, there is a large open floor, fifty by eighty feet. 
From this floor opens an alcove overlooking the lake. There are also a gallery for 
spectators, a cozy corner for Miss Coles, and a very new piano. 



SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS LIFE— Mostly Social 



STUDENT SOCIETIES 

Somerville Socielyi — A dead defeated defunct derelict. 

The Crum Crec/f Navy — Splendid group of C-faring men, no one of whom has ever been 
seasick or lovesick. 

Ye Monks of Ye Dirty Towel — A student organization of especial merit. The members 
live as hermits, often locked into their rooms, and abstain from all excesses, in order 
to exert a virtuous influence on the other men. Their chief delight is m putting to rout 

The Ten Thirsty Devils — Who are hunting jobs for after July 1 . 

The Halcyon Staff — For information see Ward 2, Pennsylvania General Hospital for 
the Insane, overworked, and underdone. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon those who complete the undergraduate 
course as outlined below. Each student must have to his credit 1 24 cuts of absences, in 
addition to being a friend of Dr. Holmes. He may be required to complete additional 
credit as penalty for attending Collection more than 2 1 6 times a year. Each time a 
student is absent from class the professor mails him a red card. Four of these red cards 
may be exchanged at the Supts. office for a blue ticket, and four blue ones for a green 
ticket. One green ticket must be presented to the Dean at the end of each semester. 
Eight of these entitle the student to a diploma. The practice of trading cards for meal 
tickets is discouraged. 



I 

Z 
D 



226 



V-A--A 



SHRAPNELS 



-L 



^ 




I 



X^ar ^ims 



Oh, how I love a first hour class. 
My eyes insist on staying shut. 

(Just nudge me if he calls my name) 
I think she loves me, but — 

Why Bolshevism, sir, is what — 

Is what — (O, hell! I've no idea) — 
I'm sorry. Sir, I do not know, 

(Where is the place, this page or here?) 



That prof, is such an awful ass, 
I cannot understand a word — 

I wonder if she loves me still, 
It's ten days since I've heard. 

(Was that my name?) Why, I'm awake. 
You asked me if — I don't quite see 

Just what you mean, but if — I guess 
I pulled a bone — he's done with me. 



A letter ought to come today. 

She said she'd write, she wouldn't fail. 
Thank heaven there's the bell at last, 

I'll quit this now and get my mail. 



^utobiograpl)^ 

I am Edgar White Burrill. I have written two books about fate, been to Russia and 
taught for eighteen years. I teach English, but I usually talk in ministerial tones about 
the Bolsheviki, because I have all the inside dope on them. I go to Sunday school with 
the son of John D. Rockefeller. Sad but true. If anyone sneezes in my class, I will 
kill him with a steely glance from my bright blue eyes. 



^ ^ ^ ^ 



227 



\-4k-^- 



HALCYON 








n 



7 



z-^A-* /='<>;/*' 7- r' 



7 
D 






'* I "ml 

•"I- J ..:J|^;' ■..•l|;..i^!k 







.W-*;:- 






"^ ^ 



228 



G 

z 
c 



Swarthmore College 
S. A. T. C. 



REPORT OF 
DELINQUENCIES 



November 16, 1918. 
Pvt. Doc Cornog, 
Officer of the Day. 



Xanie of 
Offender 



Col. Reynolds 
P\'t. Moldawer 
Lt. Pawling 
Pvt. Wise 
Sgt. Howell 
Sgt. Stow 
Segt. Benjamin 
Pvt. Lowden 
Sgt. Fetter 
Col. Reynolds 
Sgt. Jenkins 
Sgt. Jenkms 
Pvt. Kelsey 
Pvt. Kelsey 
Lt. Rhodes 
Pvt. Jackson ) 
Pvt. Joyce ) 

Cpl. Cams 
Capt. Brautigam 
Sgt. Joseph 



Delinquency With Date and Place 

Sloppy salute and poor appearance 

Toothbrush under bed at inspection 

Insubordination to Officer of the Day 

Up before reveille 

Swearing at private in ranks 

Rough-house after taps 

Rough-house after taps 

Asleep in ranks 

Chewing tobacco in ranks 

Failure to salute 

Sleeping through reveille — 47th offense 

Dust on alarm clock at inspection 

On time for mass formation 

Late returning on pass 

Shoes in laundry bag at inspection 

Fussing in Parrish after taps (3rd offense) .... 

Absent Without Official Leave 

Holding up supplies and sending them to Chester 
Fraternizing with privates 



Name of Person 
Making Report 

Officer of the Day 
Officer of the Day 
Officer of the Day 
Sgt. Joseph 
Pvt. Slocum 
Sgt. Benjamin 
Segt. Stow 
Sgt. Place 
Officer of the Day 
Lt. Rhodes 
Sgt. Ogden 
Officer of the Day 
Sgt. Morgan 
Sgt. Ogden 
Officer of the 

Cpl. Carris 

Officer of the Day 
Sgt. Valentine 
Pvt. Moldawer 



P 



Day ^ 



Pvt. Doc Cornog, O. D. 



Our Oale of "^oe 



We've had all kinds of things this year 

We never had before ; 
The first of our afflictions was 

The Army Training Corps; 
And then we all got thin and pale. 

Not knowing what to do. 
For everywhere we went we feared 

That we would catch the flu; 
And then we all got quarantined. 

And sat upon the fence. 
And watched the people going by; 

We thought we'd lose our sense. 
To add next to our grief and woe 

They gave us mops and brooms. 



And told us for our country's sake 

To sweep and dust our rooms. 
We waited on the tables 

Just like at an automat. 
And someone always wanted bread 

When we at last had sat. 
Then came the agitation 

That we're going to the dogs. 
And that we're overorganized 

With clubs and baseball togs; 
Next to add to our doleful plight, 

The climax of vexations. 
The prep school got the smallpox, a 

We all got vaccinations. 




19 



z 

D 







20 







I 



230 



'^--^Jk- 



SHRAPNELS 



"Sunior Single 



J 
I 

z 

D 



A Campbell with a White-side Drew a carload of nut Meigs; 
A Car-man held the Leeder, and a Smith drove in him pegs. 
The Campbell is too hard Prest on, he Means to break his Fetter; 
He pulls until he busts it off, and says, "That feels much better." 
The Car-man then runs after him, until a toe he Stubbs, 
The Campbell hides behind a Bush and slyly his nose rubs. 
They took the case before a Judge, who with a Pen-rose up. 
And said that he had Hald-a-man ; he was a dirty pup. 
A Stabler leads the Campbell off, to Gird-wood all day long; 
While he himself May-hew the logs, and sing this little song: 
"What makes you come so Oehrle, dear, you know you are a bore. 
I want no Moore that Noble stuff, I'll never see you Moore." 
And when the song has all been sung, the Campbell dies of grief; 
They fling him Pell-mell in a Coffin, which gives him no relief. 
The Car-man o'er in Francis now, a Gardiner for his friend. 
Both fighting for that Wilson man, and so they meet their end. 



jFalling Scents 



I 

z 

D 



Dropping, dropping, dropping, dropping. 

Hear the pennies fall ; 
'Twas the old night-watchman walking. 

Hourly, down the hall. 



Dropping, dropping, dropping, dropping. 

Hear the pennies fall ; 
Could it be the old night-watchman. 

In Collection hall? 



At the crack he takes the letters. 

Counts the pennies o'er, 
And with a clatter which awakes us. 

Drops them on the floor. 



No, it's not; it is Miss Baldwin, 

Giving us a readmg, 
But, alas, the pennies falling. 

Keep her from proceeding. 



2.31 



HALCYON 



z 




I 
z 



a32 



^-A--^ 



SHRAPNELS 



3farol6 X^ebster's iDictionar;? 



I 

q 



Absence System — Invented by Dr. Brooks in 1903 B. C, and understood only by 
Ducky and Gilbert Tomlinson. 

The 1 :29 — Genesis 1 :25, "The Lord made everything that creepeth." 

The Board Walk — A place where the inhabitants of Wharton slowly promenade be- 
fore breakfast to show off their new spring clothes. 

The Pet — An animal with four legs m the front hall, usually occupied by Freshmen 
girls after dinner. 

The AsPHALTUM — At 1 :28 — the longest distance between two points. 

College Dance — Attended by Miss Michener, Lank Grobert, and Freshmen girls. 

Exam. Week — An excuse to go to the Pie Shop. 

The Flu ! ! ! ! 

Vaccination and Quarantine — Innovations by Dr. Kistler to put the Pie Shop out 
of busmess. 

The Public Ledger — Something which tal{es your spare cash for a year, but rvhich 
you only gel once a week- Recommended by Dr. Broods because it tells the truth 
about his War Aims Class. By paying $5 extra you may receive your copy before 
Collection the morning after you need it, instead of the day before. And even if you 
read it every day, Sunday included, you will flunk ihe course because you missed the 
sixteenth page of the Evening Bulletin, third column from the left, forty-eight lines 
down. 



I 

z 



'He's the fastest prof, in college." 

'I don't think so. He admitted that he'd never pass me.' 



.n 



He — "Where were you vaccinated?' 
She — "In the infirmary." 



Boy (visiting dame) — "Corney Stabler, do you know the difference between a crag, 
a precipice, and a cliff?" 

Corney (on divan) — "No." 

B. V. D. — "The crag is where you peak, and the precipice is where you have to 
look out." 

C. O. D.— "How about the chff?" 
B. V. D. — "That's where you fall!" 



^ ^ ^ ^ 



2.3.3 




I 
z 

D 



We've Got 'Em On the List 






234 



^-A--A 



Oi)e 1920 TfalcYon 



COLLEGE BALLOT 



The Results of the Ballot of College Opinion 



I 

z 

D 



„ , A/i £ c 1 ( Man . - . - Drew Pearson 

Done the Most ror owartrimore - 

( Woman - - - - KiTTY BeLVILLE 

,. T^ 1 ( Man - - Al Pierce 

Most Popular ] 

( Woman HoPE RiCHARDSON 

n . , , ( Man Pard Larkin 

Best Athlete - 

( Woman - - - - - - MaRY Vernam 

Handsomest Man ----.. Grant Emerson Benjamin 

Most Beautiful Girl MaRGE Kistler 

Wittiest -----..-.. Nick Carter 

Most Talented -___-.. Katherine Fahnestock 

Most Apt to Succeed -_.__-- Jim Bogardus 

Most Obliging --------- PuM Koo Park 

Most Original - - - Ardis Baldwin 

Most Tactful - - - Mary Wilson 

Sportiest ---------- Eddie Carris 

College Shark IsABEL Briggs Meyers 

College Grind - - - - - - - - Preston Judd 

College Flunker ------- GILBERT ToMLINSON 

Optimist ---------- Ida Meigs 

Lady's Man Ed Atkins 

Woman Hater HoWARD Jenkins 

Laziest ---------- Frank Dudley 

College Bluffer JUDD Ballard 

Heaviest Case JoHN Ogden AND DoT YoUNG 

Most Popular Prof. DoC MiLLER 

„ „ f Man .----... Doc Price 

tSest Dancer J 

[ Woman ------- Reds Speakman 

Noisiest Fred Wiese 

Best Natured ----.-.- George Conahey 



n 



2;i5 



z 

D 




RECOGNIZE HENRY? 



Tfasl) 



On Monday when the hash comes round. 

It does perplex our minds. 
We wonder what the stuff can be, 

For they're so many kmds 
Of little, round, hard molecules. 

And long, thin, skinny shreds ; 
Some bits of red and bits of green. 

And crusts of ancient breads. 
There chemists slowly shake their heads. 

For they cannot surmise 
What kinds of "ons " and "ates " and "ics" 

Our Monday hash comprise. 
Biologists ponder in vain 

The structure of the cells. 



And only then can know them by 

Their looks and shapes and smells. 
For all the beans are in disguise 

And eggs have changed their looks. 
And cabbages take on a form 

Ne'er seen in earth or books. 
For Monday's hash comprises all 

We've had throughout the week. 
And if by any chance its left, 

The next day you may seek, 
f-or nothing ever goes to waste, 

And if you look, you may 
See what is left of Monday's hash 

In soup we have Tuesday. 



I 

z 

D 



(Captivating ^aip 



A miracle has happened. 
The strangest thing by far. 

For we right here in college 
Have a light opera star. 

Yes, he can yodel like a breeze, 
Has lullabies so sweet. 



They rival Mary Garden 
And rag men in the street. 

But when it comes to dancing. 
By George, he's the whole show. 

For he IS a past master 

With the light fantastic toe. 



SHRAPNELS 





r 
z 

D 




I 

z 

D 



(Tune — "My Mother-in-Law") 

I came into Parrish Hall, 

And there stood a thing against the wall 

Not like a dog at all ; 

And furthermore it wasn't like a cat. 

And twenty curious youths upon its back there sat. 

I was mighty puzzled you bet; 

They never fed it, 

Yet they said it 

Was the college pet. 

I went into the post office rush, 

And what did I care for the awful crush. 

For my mail box was full. 

I jostled all the people aside 

And drew my letters forth m great and hasty pride ; 

Then my smile was put to a test, 

A bill and ad. 

Was all I had. 

My room-mate had the rest. 

I looked through the book room door 

And there was a mop in the middle of the floor 

I'd never seen before. 

And when I went to investigate. 

The fuzzy mop told me my voice to modulate; 

You can imagine what surprise was mine. 

Instead of a handle. 

Oh, what scandal. 

There was Caroline. 



237 



^-A--4^ 



HALCYON 



r 

7 
D 





I 



"^ulog^ 



Deserted is the Library walk. 

The alcoves even more ; 

No longer stands he in the hall 

Chewing an apple core. 

The maidens now pass by unseen 

Before the lonely pet. 

For one has gone from out our midst, 

One we will not forget. 

Descended from the great Lord Greb 

He came to us one day. 

And in the course of time, he has 

Descended a long way. 

Contmually we miss his gaze, 

His chin poised in the air. 



The wild and strange look in his eyes. 

His long disheveled hair. 

We miss his dancing, faltering steps. 

His stare where'er we go ; 

We miss his soul-inspiring voice 

Murmuring, Oh ho! Oh ho! 

No more white roses come our way. 

Or courtly deviltry — 

The boys in College do not know 

True Danish chivalry. 

Our interest in the noble Dane 

Shall never, never cease; 

The only Axel we have now 

Is just plain axel-grease. 



238 



^-A--^ 



SHRAPNELS 



^ ^turser^ ^J^br*^"^ 



We girls in Swarthmore are well trained. 

Of that you may be sure; 

The Managers got us a nurse. 

And now we must endure 

To wear our hair in simple style 

With ribbons neatly tied. 

We never bite our finger nails, — 

That she can not abide. 

Our pinafores are nice and clean. 

Our shoes are shined just so. 

And never twice may we be seen 

Talking with the same beau. 

And if we're bad, and disobey. 

She puts us in the corner 



Until we prove to her we are 
A true, repentent mourner. 
At table we are lady-like. 
And never would throw water ; 
We keep our elbows in our laps. 
And do all things we ought'er. 
At ten o'clock we go to bed 
To get our sleep for beauty. 
We always do as we are told, — 
She tells us it s our duty. 
And when we disobey Exec, 
She makes us stand about. 
And says the goblins will get us 
If we don't watch out! 



I 

z 

D 



I 

7 
D 



'W[)zr<i Ob ^J^b-^re? 



Our college was the proud possessor 

Of a Pacifist. 
But as a history professor 

His name was on the list. 

He used to speak at Washington, 
To help maintain the peace. 

Until they thought he was a Hun, 
And made his speeches cease. 



So our professor he did try 
To clear from stain his name. 

He knew he was no German spy. 
Although he had that fame. 

He, therefore, sought to be disguised. 
And shaved off his mustache. 

And as he was not recognized, 
He made an awful mash. 



They knew he had no Hun intention. 
But would the League enhance; 

They sent him on a peace convention. 
And now he is in France. 



^ 



2.39 



Ol)e iDiar^ 



April 



Mon. 1 — Spring vacation begins and 
ends. Public ledger features photos and 
story of Food Conservation Course. 

Tues. 2 — Patriotic students try to con- 
vince themselves that they are glad to be 
back at work. Helen Atkins develops the 
measles. 

Wed. 3 — Dr. Hull uses slang. War 
IS Hell! 

Thurs. 4 — Numerous prisoners captured 
by Bookies on the front campus. 

Fri. 5 — Women's and Men's Combined 
Glee Club Concert successful in spite of 
measles. Charley Wassman demonstrates 
how a freshman ought to act. 



Q 







tf4i 



^4 



Sat. 6 — Heavy fighting in the U. of P. 
sector, for 1 4 mnmgs, but only one trench 
lost by S. C. — hard luck! 

Mon. 8 — Dean Meeteer reads 1 04 
Psalm in Collection for a change. 

Tues. 9 — Phi Delta Theta installation 
— all right job. 

Wed. 1 — Tetlock pursuades us to 
give a few more hard earned pennies to 
the Red Cross. 

Thurs. 1 1 — Phi Delta's reception; Ger- 
man spy discovered on roof of Book and 
Key house enjoying the sleet. Fred Don- 
nelly Hooverizes by not dipping his hand 
in the flour barrel. 

Fri. 12 — Joint Extemp. Contest. Issy 
Jacobs tells the faculty how Collection 
ought to be run. 



Sat. 1 3 — Somerville Day. Men eat 
grab lunch m the gym, while women feast 
on salad, ice cream and toasts. 

Sun. ] 4 — Ledger invents wild tales 
about Edith Mendenhall, to account for 
her winning Lucretia Mott scholarship. 

Mon. I 5 — Liberty Loan rally in town. 
Farmerettes and Little House parade, not 
to mention the classes. Miss Gorham in 
her own. 

Tues. 1 6 — Sigma Tau elections. Of- 
fensive launched in lacrosse, and U. of P. 
takes another trench, history repeating it- 
self. 

Wed. 1 7 — Columbia opens heavy ar- 
tillery fire, but is repulsed 3-2. Eddie 
Carris keeps his gas mask on during whole 
operation. 

Thurs. 1 8 — All the old guard turns out 
on the campus to fuss. Large attendance. 
Dave Griscom and Erd Wilson take a 
shot at it. Even Frank Fetter gets up his 
courage. 

Fri. 1 9 — Fourth East gives a noisy 
hour party. Mary Campbell and Tish 
McNeel show the fussers how it ought to 
be done. 

Sat- 20— D. A. S. and G. I. K. say 
sweet things about each other in the course 
of a couple of dances at Rose Valley and 
the Woman's Club, respectively. 

Sun. 21 — Professor Pace delivers his 
farewell address. 

Mon. 22 — Miss Brewster tells how 
Mr. Vassar decided to take time off from 
his brewery to found a college. Another 
nigger stiff arrives for Doc Trotter's lab. 

Tues. 23 — Soph-Senior picnic. Her- 
rick and McClintock try to outrun each 
other. Girls forget that marshmallows are 
to be eaten and use them for powder puffs. 



240 



WATCH THE 5IGN3 



( 5 TOPl^kroF 1 




241 



Wed. 24 — Ogden repulses heavy Navy 
attack, 5-0. The stiff goes on a rampage 
and felines decomposs on the same day, 
not to mention the turtles. Doc Trotter 
tries to train his olfactory nerves. 

Thurs. 25 — Penn opens heavy artillery 
fire, but is repulsed with losses, 2-1 . Wid- 
ener's life is threatened by a vicious Penn 
warrior, but instead of winning an uon 
cross he only wins lacrosse. (Joke). 

Fri. 26 — Measles! ! ! Kappas raid the 
Pest House. 

Sat. 27 — Eli artillery opens an in- 
tense baseball bombardment, but is re- 
pulsed, 6-0. A patrol of track athletes 
reconnoiter in Penn Relays and come out 
second. 

Sun. 28 — Student Meeting — Students 
enjoy listening to the faculty. More Kap- 
pas in the Pest House. 

Mon. 29 — Drew Pearson elected edi- 
tor of 'the other" Swartmore Publication. 
Dr. Blessing brings 1,000,000 tons of 
coal to Collection. 

Tues. 30 — Continued coal in Collec- 
tion. Freshies try to give Juniors a picnic 
in the rain. 

May 

Wed. 1 — Rain and track meet stop in 
time to sea fair May maidens gambol on 
the green. 




Thurs. 2 — Mary Roberts and Char- 
lotte Bunt:ng tennis charr.pions. 



Sat. 4 — Successful raiding operations 
all along the Ime — in track, lacrosse, base- 
ball, and tennis. 

Sun. 5 — Sunday — Hostile attacks cease 
for the day. 

Mon. 6 — Men's Student Government 
decides that it would be useless to let 
another Soph class try to surpass "Cap- 
tain Jinks." G. I. K. and D. A. S. amuse 
the rest of Parrish and Wharton from 3 to 
5 A. M. Miss Meeteer especially is lulled 
to peaceful slumber. 

Tues. 7 — French picnic. Miss Bronk 
appears in the latest sport attire and per- 
suades Issy Jacobs to eat some ice cream 
salt. G. I. K. and D. A. S. agree to let 
war rage in Europe. 

Wed. 8 — Alpha Theta Pi announces 
that it has existed almost a year. Leave it 
to 1920 to keep a secret! 

Thurs. 9 — Exams begin. The night 
watchman gets blisters on his knuckles. 

Fri. 10 — Fish stimulates strenuous 
studes. 

Sat. 1 I — Exams encourage earnest en- 
deavors. 

Sun. 1 2 — Three students go to meeting 
(at least we imagine so, we were not 
there). 

Tues. I 4 — Only the sound of scratch- 
ing pens disturbs the unbroken silence of 
the college. 

Wed. 15— The 1919 Halcyon ar- 
rives in trunks. We shng ours on the table 
and go on studying. 

Thurs. 1 6 — The Board of Managers 
lets up a little and obstructs the view from 
the Pet with a service flag. 

Fri. 1 7 — Everybody goes home. 



242 




A New Rose Species — the Most Floriferous 
Perfectly Hardy, Bright Yellow Rose 

"HUGONIS 

BLOOMS TEN DAYS EARLIER THAN ANY OTHER ROSE 

Mrs. Dr. W. Van Fleet. Washington, D. C. spring 1917, said to our 
President. Robert Pyle: "We had Hugonis in bloom during the last 
snowstorm, and I never saw a more beautiful sight." 

We are constantly on the lookout for new good Roses, and we believe we 
were the first Rose growers in this country to recognize the value of Hugonis. 
Our original stock was secured by Mr. Pyle in 191 1, when on a visit to 
England, and came direct from stock raised from seed from North Central 
China, Mr, E. H, Wilson, of the Arnold Arboretum, describes Hugonis as 
follows: "It is an upright-growing shrub 6 to 8 feet tall, and more in diame- 
ter, with slender and spreading branches. The single, fragrant flowers, each 
about ayi inches across, are produced all along the branches, and so freely 
are they borne that the branches become yar?-.'cng .trrnys 0/ soft yellow." 
_ Hugonis is indeed the herald of Roses, and you will find it offered in three 
sizes, with almost four hundred other choice varieties in our 

1919 Spring Floral Guide 

which we will be glad to send free on request. Write for it to-day. 



SPECIAL OFFER — If you mention "The 1920 Halycon" when order- 
ing $5 worth of "Hugonis" Roses, we will present you with a copy of 
our 121-page book, "HOW TO GROW ROSES," by Robert Pyle, if you 
request it when ordering. 



The pONARD 

V/& JONES CO. 

ROBERT PYLE. President 



TST GROVE 

PENNA. 

ANTOINE WINTZER, Vice-Pres. 



(|£, 



24:; 




Sat. 1 8 — Class Day. The Seniors give 
an exhibition of how undignified they used 
to be. Penn deHvers a successful shrapnel 
attack in baseball, 7-3. Mr. and Mrs. 
Donnelly, in "Pomander Walk," show 
how it all happened. 



Sun. 19- 
time. 



-Bill Reilly orates for the last 



Mon. 20 — Commencement — The Se- 
niors are glad they had no Easter holiday. 




September 

Mon. 1 6 — Dining-room waitresses con- 
spicuous by their absence. A Freshman 
wants to know if the Book and Key house 
is the family vault of the college president. 

Tues. 1 7 — Miss Gorham is mobbed 
and offers to teach all the English classes. 
Girls enjoy stag dining-room. 

Wed. I 8 — Freshman girls have break- 
fast at 6 A. M. Juniors try to look young- 
er than the Freshmen at their Baby party. 

Thurs. 19—1921 Soph show takes the 
form of a musical comedy, "Whistle, Liz- 
zie, Whistle." Gloom — S. A. T. C. men 
cannot linger in the hall to fuss. 




Fri. 20 — Joy — Fussers arrange 
ish dinner fifteen minutes earlier. 



to fin- 



Sat. 2 1 — Unusual number of Saturday 
classes discovered. Influenza victims dance 
at Y. W. reception. 

Sun. 22 — S. A. T. C. departs from 
college luxury and eats from planks. Crum 
Creek Navy causes sensation by appearing 
in girls' dinmg room. Rumors that the 
men are to eat in the gym., so that soup 
can be made m the swimming pool. 

Mon. 23 — Blue hair-ribbons much m 
evidence. Freshmen without first hour 
classes suddenly become popular. 



244 



The 

Swarthmore National Bank 

A place where your efficiency 
may be increased 




Students' Accounts Solicited 

open for Iliishmss at S:00 A. M. 

Phonk 31 



Learn something of the Commercial Laws of Banking bj' 
forming bank connections with us. The knowledge you 
thus gain about banking and business in general will 
prove a valuable asset to you later in life. Learn NOW 
while you have the opportunity. 



Officers 



EDWARD B. TEMPLE, Pi-esidc-nt 
CHAS. D. JOYCE, Vice Piesidc-nt 



GERALD H. EFFING. Oisliic-r 
E. S. SPROAT. Assistant Casliier 



Ell ward B. Tciiiijlo 
.Joseph Swain 
Chas. Paxson 



Direitorfi 

Cluis. D. .Joyce 
Wm. C. Spi-oul 
.John ]''. MuiTav 



J. livei-ton Ramsey 
Thomas S. Safford 
C. Pcicy Webster 



245 




Tues. 24 — Telephone on second west 
out of order. Campbell broken-hearted. 
The male English teachers, after seeing 
the number of girls in their classes, develop 
the flu. Rumors that the girls will run 
the "Phoenix." 





Wed. 25 — Soph hazing machine rises 
to full speed. Fresh girls wear their mid- 
dies backward to breakfast. 

Thurs. 26 — Infirmary overflows. Mrs. 
Barrett opened the window and in flew 
enza. 




Fn. 27 — Special news dispatch to the 
Halcyon. Sun shines for Prexy's re- 
ception. French girls arrive. 

Sat. 28 — College dance called off on 
account of flu. 

Sun. 29 — Sunday school closed by 
Board of Health. Jud Ballard greatly 
affected. 

Mon. 30 — Collection seats assigned. 
Great consternation among the girls at find- 
ing the men across the aisle. 

October 

Tues. 1 — S. A. T. C. formally in- 
stalled by a bugle solo from Parrish dome. 
Prexy speaks without notes. Mary Ver- 
nam brings a returned soldier to Liberty 
Loan rally. 

Wed. 2 — Girls, struck with returned 
soldier's looks, buy Liberty Bonds. 

Thurs. 3 — Weeping and wailing and 
gnashing of teeth. Universal quarantine 
goes into effect. Girls spend the afternoon 
breaking dates for the week-end. 




Fri. 4 — Little boys do big business be- 
tween the Pie Shop and the hungry line 
on the fence. 



246 




247 



Sat. 5 — Station platform declared full 
of germs. More tears. Library full on 
Saturday night for the first time since 56 
B. C. (It is always sober at other times). 

Sun. 6 — The singing of "Keep the 
Home Fires Burning" is prohibited in the 
interest of the conservation of fuel. 

Mon. 7 — Collection singing omitted. 
Evidently they are not trying to conserve 
fuel in the hereafter. 

Tu8s. 8 — J. R. H. uses strong language 
against the Germans. War "Phoenix" 
comes out; time saved in reading it will be 
spent in studying. 

Thurs. 1 — Hamlet, the melancholy 
Dane, returns from the flu to the halls 
of Swarthmore. Reports of a burglar in 
Wharton. 

Fri. I I — Burglar reports turn cut to be 
merely the reports of a pistol. 

Sat. 12 — 1922 gives noisy hour party, 
which forces Keith's out of business. 

Sun. 1 3 — No church. 

Mon. 1 4 — New table system for girls 
starts. Collection singing starts again. We 
will all grow wings yet. 

Tues. I 5 — President Wilson and the 
Phoenix refuse peace terms. 




Germans to go to H — (no, not Heaven). 
Brooksy agrees with her. Mass meeting. 

Thurs. 1 7 — Mass meeting discontinued. 
Of all sad words of tongue or pen, 
The saddest are these — no game with Penn. 

Fn. 1 8 — A barrel of Dr. Trotter's 
fish is sent to the kitchen by mistake. We 
have an uncomfortable feeling that per- 
haps this has happened before. Sophs 
raise Cain at the Library. 

Sat. 1 9 — Library closed by imperial 
decree of J. R. H. Full moon shines 
through the quarantine clouds. Junior- 
Soph reception teaches the Fresh how to 
fuss. 

Sun. 20 — Unusual occurrence — Bill 
Ridpath and Fred Boughton visit Swarth- 
more. 

Mon. 21 — Brooks gives an exam in 
War Aims. Oh, wie schoene! 




Wed. 16 — Betty Atherholt says that 
President Wilson should have told the 



Tues. 22 — The latest from Queen 
Fashion's Paris court — Dust caps and 
aprons on second west. Girls decide they 
would rather be happy than married. 



248 



Joseph T. Sullivan Marshall P. Sullu-an 



CRETH & SULLIVAN 

General Insurance 



S. E. Cor. 4th and Walnut Sts. PHILADELPHIA 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



BIOREN & CO. 

Bankers 

Deal in High-Grade Municipal, Railroad and 
Public Utility Securities. 

Execute Stock Exchange Orders in all Markets. 

Transact a General Banking Business. 

314 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 



249 




Wed. 23 — The Crum Creek Navy 
leads community singing. 

Thurs. 24 — Historic battle of Lieper- 
ville. Bill Ridpath gets serious at mass 
meeting. 

Fri. 25 — McClintock goes to the zoo, 
slightly jagged. Moving day for the S. 
A. C. T. 




Sat. 26 — "Shorty" returns to see our 
victory over Ursinus, but is cheated out of 
his old job by sanitary drinking cups. 
First S. A. T. C. dance. 



Sun. 27 — One hour more of sleep; un- 
usual crowd at breakfast. Joseph and 
squad 



the 



wr 



th th 



eir 



Benjamin entertain 
infantry drill. 

Mon. 28 — From merry mirth to mourn- 
ful mid-semesters. Seniors decide to defy 
convention and shed their caps and gowns. 

Tues. 29 — Miss Lukens quells a race 
riot in the front hall. Betty Atherholt sits 
on the Pet. 



Wed. 30 — Austria sends a peace note 
to President Wilson. S. A. T. C. sends 
a war note to Prexy. 

Thurs. 31 — S. A. T. C. shows up P. 
M. C. in battalion review. Eddie Carris 
sweeps Collection Hall (with his arm). 

November 

Fn. 1 — Delta Gammas showed marked 
increase in studies, because, since they 
bobbed their hair, there is nothing on their 
mind. 

Sat. 2 — We help Penn out of a tight 
place by beating her, 20-12. Seniors cele- 
brate with a class dance. 

Sun. 3 — Miss Bronk takes another 
French major for an auto ride. The Loot 
announces that S. A. T. C. will adopt the 
West Point demerit system. 

Mon. 4 — Hip, hip, hooray ! Quaran- 
tine lifted. Students decide they want a 
Thanksgiving vacation. 

Tues. 5 — Board of Managers surren- 
der and give us our vacation. 

Wed. 6 — Date of Junior dance changed 
for 1 6th time. Dinner hour changed to 
6.15. Fussers have fifteen minutes longer 
to refrain from studying. 

Thurs. 7 — J. Russell beseeches us to 
be sober. Peace rumors send the whole 
college (except S. A. T. C.) to town on 
the 2.38 short line. Vahant S. A. T. C. 
veterans parade through Swarthmore's city 
streets posing as heroes mid applause of 
Mary Lionesses. Social anarchists win and 
we have a dance on Thursday night. 

Fn. 8 — Peace rumors denied. Back 
to the grind again. 



250 



Logan Trust Company 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

1431 Chestnut Street 

West Philadelphia Office Fifteenth Street OiRce 

6324 Woodland Aveniie 152 North 15th Street 



Invites the Accounts of Individuals, Firms 
and Corporations 

Acts as Executor, Trustee, Administrator 
and Guardian 



Interest Allowed at 3.65% Per Annum in the 

Savings Fund Department ROWLAND COMLY, President 

Franklin National Bank 

Chestnut Street, West of Broad, PHILADELPHIA 

INCORPORATED 1900 

Capital - - - - $1,000,000 

Surplus and Profits - - $4,500,000 

Resources Over - - - $70,000,000 

Officers 

J. R. McAllister, President W. M. GEHMANN. JR., Asst. Cashier 

J. A. HARRIS, JR., Vice President E. E. SHIELDS, Asst. Cashier 

J. WM. HARDT, Cashier M. D. REINHOLD. Asst. Cashier 

Invites the Accounts of Banks, Bankers, Corporations, Mercantile 
Firms and Individuals 

TRAVELERS LETTERS OF CREDIT ISSUED 
FOREIGN EXCHANGE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



251 



Sat. 9 — Navy Yard shows us what it 
will do to the Huns, to the tune of 6-2. 




Mon. 1 I — Armistice signed. Snake 
dance at 4.30 A. M. Collection at 
7.45. No classes. Palmer and Judd 
hold forth at college, while all Swarth- 
more snake-dances down Broad Street. 

Tues. 12 — The morning after the day 
before. No lessons done. 

Wed. I 3 — Parrish startled by a hor- 
rible noise, but calmed when it was found 
to be only Mr. Pitman dropping a per- 
pendicular. S. A. T. C. on their own for 
three hours. 

Thurs. 1 4 — One hundred gallant sons 
of S. A. T. C. march triumphantly back 
from Chester with their muskets on their 
shoulders. 

Fri. 1 5 — The Loot announces increase 
in drill schedule. First hockey victory 
over Beechwood, 3-2. 

Sat. 1 6 — Delaware army retreats be- 
fore Swarthmore aerial attack over the 
goal posts, 29-0, in spite of the band and 
officers innumerable. Would-be K. P.'s 
practice for the game by carrying baseball 
bats on shoulders ten or twelve miles. 

Sun. I 7 — Church called on account of 
rain. 

Mon. 1 8 — To be inducted or to be out- 
ducted, that is the question. 

Tues. 1 9 — Ogden now top sergeant. 
Second hockey victory over Penn Hall, 
3-2. 



Thurs. 21 — Freshmen decide to have a 
dance. Asphaltum receives its annual 
whitewash. 

Fri. 22 — Big mass meeting for Penn 
game. ''Doc" Cornog says he will do his 
"damndest." Sophs decide they will give 
a dance too. 

Sat. 23. — Student government decides 
that neither Sophs nor Fresh will give a 
dance. The Penn tragedy occurs, 7-13, 
with a large casualty list. 

Sun. 24 — Exciting bulletins arrive 
hourly concerning the Freshman picnic and 
Gardiner's nose. And Russ White at the 
Tea Room ! 

Mon. 25— S. A. T. C. finds that the 
distance to Morton has increased from two 
miles to ten, and that the size of their 
shoes has decreased from ten to two. 




Tues. 26 — Burrill again gets the flu. 

Wed. 27 — The joyful news of de- 
mobilization arrives just too late to let the 
men eat Thanksgiving dinner at home. 

Thurs. 28 — Much rain enables our con- 
valescing wounded to put one over on P. 
M. C, 7-0. 

Fri. 29 — Dr. Brooks objects to snores 
from the front ranks of war aims. 

Sat. 30— And still no girls! 



252 




THIS BANK 

INVITES 

NEW ACCOUNTS 

on the basis of efficient service, 
absolute safety, and an un- 
broken record of fifty-five years 
of conservative and successful 
management. 



Capital 
Sui-plus 



SI 00, 000. 00 
$300,000.00 



First National Bank of Media 

"The Bank of Safety and Service " 




Chester Times 



JOB Printing Depart- 
ment in the nearest big, 
complete printing plant to 
Swarthmore College. The 
students find it convenient 
to order their printing at 
the Times office, Chester, 
Pennsylvania. 



OFFICIAL PRINTERS 

for the 

PHOENIX, 

III]'; LARGEST .SWARTHMORK 
PUBLICATION' 



cTVlEDIA STEAM 
LAUNDRY 




Watch this edge 

High Standard Shirt and 
Collar Work 

Thoroughly Sanitary 
Chas. D. Manley media, PA. 



253 



December 

Mon. 2 — More snores in War Aims. 
Freshmen are requested to give precedence 
to upper class mail. Rumors of 18 days 
at Christmas. 

Tues. 3 — Dr. Goddard completes Mc- 
Clintock's zoo with a dinosaurus. 

Wed. 4 — President Wilson sails for 
Francs. Dr. Hull calls him a simple Amer- 
ican citizen. 

Thurs. 5 — 18-day rumor confirmed. 
Women's Student Government sits up till 
6 A. M. discussing table system, when it 
is interrupted by a fire drill. 

Fri. 6 — The Pearson family monopo- 
lizes the declamation contest. 

Sat. 7 — Junior dance satisfactory to all 
but the fussers who "wanta spoon." 

Sun. 8—12.05 A. M. Juniors return 
from dance. 

Mon. 9 — Mysterious dead-rattish odor 
in the hall materializes as codfish balls 
for lunch. Much noise on second west 
from a soup party. 

Tues. 10 — Fresh Boy: "I can fuss 
now." Fresh Girl: "Who taught you 
how?" 

Wed. 11—102 ex-S. A. T. Cites 
stay in bed late and utilize the 1 1 .55 train. 




Thurs. 1 2 — Soph scrubs try out for 
Halcyon. Boys decide that stag tables 
will not work for Christmas party. 

Fri. 1 3 — Girls take a vote, and decide 
to have stag tables. 

Sat. 1 4 — Boys decide to spite girls and 
have a big private banquet for Christmas 
party. 

Sun. 15 — Christmas Y. W. meeting at 
Ellis'. 

Mon. 1 6 — All halls collect money for 
Red Cross, maids, missions, Belgian 
babies, etc. 

Tues. 1 7 — Betty Atherholt sticks 1 30 
boys a dollar apiece for the Red Cross. 
Girls decide not to buy Christmas presents. 

Wed. 1 8 — Cap Howell takes dancing 
lessons. 





i. J 



Thurs. 1 9 — Boys' jazz band disturbs 
girls' Christmas party. 

Fri. 20 — Brooks cuts War Aims for 
the last time this year. 



254 



Strath Haven Inn 



And tlie 



Pompadour Tea Room 



Arc Always "At Your Command'' 



In SWARTH'NIORE. PA. 



Never Closed 



Phone 240 




BUCK HILL FALLS 



In the POCONO lAIOUNTAINS 



ExtabliahKl hy Friends for Friends and Friendly Peojlle 

We aim to have every comfort and convenience, without useless display. 
All the same, interestinff attractions. We have in the Poconos the best 
air in America. Cottages or the Inn available for the Summer— The 
WINTER INN available for the Winter. 



IIIE BUCK HILL FALLS CO. 



Buck Hill Falls, Pa. 



23.'5 



January 

Mon. 6 — The "Pennsy" puts on extra 
cars. 

Tues. 7 — The price of admission — ten 
steps and one flu certificate. Tickets col- 
lected at the Dean's office. Monks sally 
forth (or fifth) at midnight. 

Wed. 8 — Lucy and Ida, the Siamese 
twins, are even inseparable in elections for 
Junior Exec. 

Thurs. 9 — Men prevent further study- 
ing by choosing rooms. Soph Show re- 
mains in the dim future and Fresh dance 
sinks into oblivion. 

Fri. 10 — Floor five trims P. M. C. in 
opening encounter. 

Sat. 1 1 — Dr. Hull surprises the college 
by speaking in Collection. Table Com- 
mittee sits up all night. 

Sun. 1 2 — Boys enter old dining-room 
for first time this year. 

Mon. 1 3 — Conversation consists in try- 
ing to learn names of Freshmen or what 
"goat feathers" means. Dean Alexander 
elucidates at Senior smoker. 







mob the Freshies. Miss Richards mobs 
the Sophs. 

Wed. 1 5 — MacAllister drinks seven 
glasses of water for ten cents. 

Thurs. 16 — "In the Spring a young 

man's fancy ." Cornie has a date 

with Axle. 

Fri. 1 7 — Kewpies appear in the Social 
Ideals Class. Exams posted. Johnnie 
Ogden substitutes for Dr. Hull. 

Sat. 18 — Annapolis wipes us out, 
43-16. 

Mon. 20 — Kappa Sigs elect only one 
officer of Junior Class. 

Tues. 21 — Somerville dies a natural 
death. Ed Bush poses as the Halcyon 
staff. 

Wed. 22— Dr. Hull, afraid of being 
mistaken again for a German spy, shaves 
off his mustache, while the Freshman 
F riars of Ye Monks complete their 
obeisances at the feet of the Holy Altar. 

Thurs. 23 — Prexy makes a speech in 
Collection without notes. Sophmen beat 
Freshmores in debate, but Hutchinson 
opens a new era in the history of public 
speaking. 

Fri. 24 — Boys, 18; Princeton, 24. 
Girls, 2 1 ; Beechwood, 9. 

Sat. 25 — Cap Howell loses his razor. 



FREF 




Tues. 1 4 — Prexy wears a Palm Beach 
suit to hear McClintock's light Collection 
speech. Fresh girls mob the Pet. Sophs 



q-„a kelp +'^'J 9^Y 



256 



Bell Phone +6()-J 

A. FISHMAN 

Ladies' and Gent's Tailor 

Cleaning, Repairing. Dyeing 
and Pressing' 

S. W. Cor. State and Monroe Sts. 
MEDL\. PA. 



Isaac Rudnick, Sr. 

Ladies' and Gents' Custom 

TAILOR 

All kinds of Cleaning and Repairing 
Promptly Done 

Bell Phone 'im-J 

309 S. Orange Street MEDIA. PA. 



The Media Pharmacies 

S. E. Cor. 60tli and Market Sts., PHILADELPHIA 
N. W. Cor. State and Olive Sts., MEDIA 



Courtesy and Service 

Double Check on all Prescriptions 

Modern Drug Stores Complete in all their 
Departments 

Philadelphia Store Open All Night 



When in MEDIA Stop at 

J. S. BOYER 

Men's Shop 

for TOGS 



.30 West State Street 



Media Confectionery 
Company 

Home-Made Candies 

Chocolates, Bon Bons and 

Ice Cream 

23 West State Street 
MEDIA. PA. 



257 



Sun. 26 — Terrific pre-exam. grinding. 
Week-enders stick around for a change. 

Mon. 27 — Exams begin. Morning 
watch sings, "I need thee every hour." 

Tues. 28 — Meigs swears at Miss Mich- 
ener. 

Wed. 29 — Psalms 26:iii. 'Examine 
me, O Lord, and know my ways." 

Thurs. 30 — Mouse interrupts Social 
Ideals conclave. 

Fri. 31 — Exams now a mere matter 
of COURSE like today's fish. 

February 

Sat. 1 — Halcyon staff goes to New 
York. 

Sun. 2 — Everybody else goes home ex- 
cept those who have 

Mon. 3— EXAMS. Bob Blau blows 
in at a bad moment. 

Tues. 4 — Usual registration mob. 

Wed. 5 — Dr. Hull goes to France, 
thus divulging the real reason for the new 
style of shave. Ball season inaugurated 
with record-breaking window-breaking. 

Thurs. 6 — Urdahl wishes his classes 
were FULL, contrary to the teachings of 
J. R. H. 

Fri. 7— Basketball Day. S., 32; 
Ursinus, 29. Scrubs, 47; Scott Paper 
Co., 18. Girls, 21 ; Temple, 24. 

Sat. 8— S., 20; West Pomt, 19; m 
spite of Bill Stow's sprained ankle. Swarth- 
more swimmers meet Mercersburg. Senior 
dance. 

Sun. 9 — More people at meeting than 
at College dance. 

Mon. 1 — Harry Olin swells the ranks 
of the returned married Kappa Sigs. 

Wed. 1 2 — Cologne produced to drawn 
out the odor of defunct cats permeates 
Parrish. 



Thurs. 1 3 — Peaceful slumbers inter- 
rupted by two fire drills. 

Fri. 1 4 — Valentine parties. Pirates of 
Penzance rob unsuspecting audience for 
the Belgian babies. 




Sat. 15 — Penn disaster, 38-14. 

Mon. 1 7 — Urdahl wastes two weeks 

talking in Collection. Freshmen mistake 

D. A. S. for G. I. K. Lansdowne knocks 
girls out, 38-1 5. 

Tues. 18— D. A. S. and G. I. K. 
scrap. 

Wed. 19— Dr. Miller scraps in Col- 
lection. 

Thurs. 20 — Smallpox breaks out at 
Prep to introduce 

Fri. 2 1 — Prep school night. We lick 
Delaware, 26-22, in honor of the visitors. 
Priates of Penzance reappear at Hamburg 
Show III. 

Sat. 22 — In honor of G. W.'s birth- 
day we wipe out Dickinson, 48-20. 

Sun. 23 — Breakfast at nine o'clock. 
Oh, boy! Let's go! 

Mon. 24 — College gets vaccinated. 
Much limps and limpness. Al Valentine 
has a nightmare. 

Tues. 25 — Doc Mercer: "Have you 
been vaccinated?" Former S. A. T. C. 
Rookie: "Yep, I was shot at sunrise." 
Issy Jacobs gives Daddy Longlegs. New 
hymn introduced in Collection when Miss 
Baldwin speaks, "Dropping, dropping, 
dropping. Hear the pennies fall. " 



258 



CHARLES W. HALDEJIAN 



J. G. HALDEMAN Est. 



J. G. Haldeman & Bro. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
and Wholesale Grocers 

Mothers Delight Canned Goods Near By Butter and Eggs 

Our Own Milk Fed Poultry Hospitals, Hotels and Institutions Supplied 

Receiving and Feeding Station, Harrisonburg, Va. 



2918-24 Market Street 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Established Siiteen Years 



The Pie Shop 

Home-made Bread, Rolls, Pies, 
Cakes and Pastry 

Table Parties Arranged 

Picnic Parties at Short Notice 



Full Line of Sundaes 



We Make Our Own Ice Cream 




Notions 



Novelties 



The College Shop 

11 S. Chester Road 
Haberdashery 



Gents' Furnishings 



Gifts 



259 



Thurs. 27 — Jane Brown joins the 
Kappa Sigs. 

Fri. 28 — Rutgers treat us rough to the 
tune of 29-19. The girls make the first 
basketball trip in the history of the col- 
lege, beating Penn Hall and Hood. 

March 

Sat. 1 — Junior dance only 17 days 
ahead of St. Patrick's Day! Allin Pierce 
celebrates his first Alumni Banquet by 
smoking a cigar. 

Sun. 2 — Halcyon staff breaks dates 
to work on the Big Book. 

Mod. 3 — Stag dining rooms eat ice 
cream on Monday and hear Joe WilHts 
and Mrs. Griffin. 

Tues. 4 — No hymn books and much 
singing of "Amen" in Collection. Kitty 
Belville not wanting Allin Pierce to get 
ahead of her drinks 8 glasses of milk. 

Wed. 5 — Student government post- 
poned to see the girls' basketball team beat 
Kensington, 53-17. Penn shock troops 
take another Swarthmore trench, score, 
30-16. 

Fri. 7 — Girls, 1 3 ; Temple 1 1 . Re- 
venge is sweet. 

Sat. 8 — Swarthmore out-swims Lehigh. 
Music fails to show up for the college 
dance. 

Sun. 9 — Rain. 

Mon. 1 0— Y. W. C. A. T. (Y. W. 
Tea). 

Wed. 1 2 — George Jackson announces 
where he got his "No Beer No Work" 
sign. 

Thurs. 1 3 — Halcyon editor recovers 
and produces a mustache. 

Fri. I 4 — Much baby party. 



Sat. I 5 — Men's fraternities celebrate 
the coming of spring by banquets, dances 
and smokers. Debate victory over Trinity. 

Sun. 1 6 — Kay reads from Riley at 
combined Y. M. and Y. W. meeting. 

Mon. 1 7 — Dean Richards wears green 
necktie. Pistachio ice cream at the Pie 
Shop. 

Tues. I 8 — Halcyon subscription cam- 
paign wings in with a wise owl ! 

Wed. 1 9 — Freshman gym meet. 

Thurs. 20 — Cornie makes a charming 
enchantress in "Polly With a Past." 




Fri. 2 1 — Halcyon editors plan to 
spend spring vacation reading proof. The 
rest of us go home. 




260 



The Famous 

Stein -Bloch Smart Clothes 

The Famous 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 
Clothing 

For MEN and YOUNG MEN 

The Best Ready-to-Wear Clothing 
in the World 



MEN'S CUSTOM TAILORING 

High-Class Fabrics, Correct Styles 
Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed 



Sold in PliUadeJpMa Exclusively by 

STRAWBRIDGE & CLOTHIER 



261 



The West Jersey Paper Marrufacturino Corrrpairy 



Manufacturei-s of 



W. J. No. 10 Template Board, a Substitute 

for Wood, used by all Shipbuilding: 

Companies 

Open Mouth and Bates Valve Bags 

For Cement, Lime and Plaster 



Front and Elm Streets 



CAMDEN, N. J. 



Wilbraham-Green Blower Co. 

Sole Manufiictiirers of 

Green Patented Rotary Positive Pressure Blowers, 
Gas Exhausters and 
Huntoon Patented Gas 

Governors j \1 





i-S i 



POTTSTOWN 
PENNA. 



262 



Benjamin H. Shoemaker 

Distributor (if 


Williams, Darnell 
& Company 


Polished Plate Glass, 




Window Glass, 




Plain and Wire 
Skylight Glass, Etc. 

Orders promptly executed 


Anthracite 

COAT. 


from stock, for all Glass 
required in the construc- 


Bituminous 


tion of buildings. 




205-211 North Fourth Street 




PHILADELPHIA 


Drexel Building Philadelphia 


Where Modern Standards of Cleanliness Prevail 


ScofHissue 


Is the Most Satisfactory and 


Economical Towel 


SCOl 1 PAPER COMPANY 


PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


Scottis-.siie Products for Personal Hygiene 



2ii;{ 



Compliments of 

THE NATIONAL OIL COMPANY 

1608 Woolworth Building 
New York 



264 




A Swarthmore Tradition 

Every student who has ever attended Swarthmore College 
since its foundation, has known and liked WHITMAN'S. 
Whenever its students have wanted the best in chocolates 
the}- have bought WHITMAN'S. Now the proper gift is 




SWARTHMORE PACKAGE 
CHOCOLATES 



Other gifts, treats and necessaries are always convenient at 
the headquarters for Swarthmore student buying. 

VICTOR D. SHIRER 

Druggist 



Drugs 



Cameras 



Sodj 



Toilet Supplies 



2fi5 




f you realize die 
importance of a 
pod appearance, 
yeull appreciate 
theQiaractei-of 
our Clothes. 



Jacob Reed's Sons 
•Qothiers- 
nabcrdashers 
■Hatters- 

1K4H26 Chestnut SL 
Philadelphia 



H. D. REESE 

Purveyor to 
Swarthmore College 

Meats 

1203 Filbert St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Wm. Bertsch & Co. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Hand Books 
a Specialty 

N. E. Cor. 6th and Arch Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 



ESTABLISHED 1818 

©mtlemtn's '^urnisljing 0tioiis, 

MADISON AVENUE COR. FOBTY-FOUBTH STREET 
NEW YORK 

2'elephone Murray Hill SSllO 

This is a complete Establishment 

operated continuously 

for more than One Hundred Years 

under the same name 

and still in the control of the 

Direct Descendants of the Founders 

We specialize in the Outfitting- 

of Men and Boys from Head to Foot 

ivith Garments and Accessories 

for Every Requirement of 

Day or Evening Wear 

Dress, Business, Travel or Sport 

Jlliistrated Catalogue on JRef/tiest 

Uniforms and Personal Equipment 

for Officers in the Service of 

the LInited States 



The Ingleneuk 

Tea House 

E-Ncellent Luncheons 
Attractive Afternoon Teas 
Tempting Dinners 
Superlative Sunday Night Suppers 



!■,'() Park Av 



SWARTHMORE. PA. 



I. H. Wisler & Son 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Chairs and 
Rockers 

323-25 N. Sixth Street 
Cltik-n of 78 PHILADKLPHIA 



266 



BINDER 



Shampooing Scalp Treatment 

Hair Cutting Marcelling 



Six Floors 

As fair n.v a woman's hah, so fair is her whole beauty 

We Beautify Hair 

And Wf give you the newest modes of coiffures 



'Tlu: H<inxr Witlwiit (i Froini" 



Established 63 Years 

THIRTEENTH ABOVE CHESTNUT 



DANIEL B. SHEPP, President 



EDGAR A. MURPHY, Sec"y-Treas. 



MURPHY-PARKER CO 



Edition Book Binders 



N. AV. Cor. Seveiitli nnd Ari'li Streets 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 







-^-J, 








Coinpanp 

filG Cliestnut St., PHILADELPHIA 
Official Fraternity Jewelers 

Jeweler.s and Silversmiths 
Diamond JMerchants 

"An examination of our pins will con- 
vince you that they are the best pins 
made. Which accounts for the fact that 
the price is somewhat hig-hei- than 
others. These facts, together with 
prompt delivery, have vastly increased 
our business. Why not send us your 
orih'r ? 

Specialists in 

Fraternity Batlg-es, College Pins. Seals. 

l"'obs. Novelties. Rings, Charms. 

Prizes. 'I'rophies, Medals 



2K7 



UNIFORMS 

SUITS 

OVERCOATS 

HATS 

FURNISHINGS 

BROWNING KING & CO. 

1524-1526 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



268 



JOHN W. HOLLAND CO. 



Caterers 



W. NEWMAN, Mai-. 



Weddings, Parties, Collations and Fashionable Dinners 
Furnished with Any Dish Desired 

CoiiipetcMit Service Furnished — Open All the Year 



No. 115 N. Nineteenth Street 



PHILADELPHIA 



Wilbert Mathis, P. D. 

Ejcpert 
Prescription 

Work 

ELLIS PHARMACY 

Cor. Orange and Wa.shington Streets 
MEDIA. PA. 



Bell 3-2T-W 

Arcadia Restaurant 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

11)7 West State Street. Mei)i,\. P.\. 
24 Lancaster Ave., Ahdmoue, P.\. 

CHIOS and ANN OS, Proprietors 





269 



Property Insurance Chart* 



Fire Insurance 

Buildings. Equipment. Contents and 
Personal Property. 

Toi'nado Insurance 

A)j;ainst damage or loss by high winds 
and tornadoes. 

Explosion Insurance 

Inherent liazards of production pro- 
cesses and bomb and explosion plots 
of cranks, enemy sympathizers and 
propagandists. 

Riot and Civil Commotion 

Can be written to cover Strikes. Riot, 
Insurrections, Civil Commotion and 
Inside and Outside Explosion Hazard. 

Use and Occupancy 

Insures profits and fixed charges dur- 
ing interruption caused by Fire, Ex- 
plosion or Tornado. 

Sprinkler Leakage 

Covers loss by water damage from 
Sprinkler Systems. 

Rent and Leasehold 

Loss of rents or occupancy as a result 
of fire. 



Builders Risk Insurance 

Covers buildings in course of con- 
struction. 

Marine Insurance 

On liuUs and cargoes, both domestic 
and foreign shipments. 

Marine War Risk 

Covering perils of war on both foreign 
and domestic shipments. 

Cotton Insurance 

On domestic and foreign shipments 
of cotton. 

Tourist Insurance 

Baggage and personal effects, sport- 
ing paraphernalia, etc. 

Parcel Post Insurance 

Packages shipped by Parcel Post. 

Registered Mail Insurance 

Packages shippetl by Registered Mail 

Automobile Insurance 

Fire. Theft. Collision and property 
damage on pleasure cars and com- 
mercial trucks. 

Commercial Travelers 

On samples and equipment of sales- 
men. 



*The Insurance Company of North America, now in its l'27th yearand strength- 
ened financially and in experience because of its long service to the property owners 
of the Nation with which it has " grown up." is fully equipped to meet the complex 
needs of the hour. 

Check off the forms indicated above, in \\hich you are interested most and call 
in the local agent of the company. There are more than 10,000 of them in the 
United States. Canada and Cuba. 

Insurance Company of 

NORTH AMERICA 

Philadelphia 

Oldest American Stock Insurance Company 

Founded 1792 

Assets Over .?30.()00,000 



270 



E. A. Wright Co. 

Office and Factory 

Broad and Huntingdon Streets 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Engraxiei'S — Pointers 
Stationers 

Manufacturers of 

Class and Society Pins, 
Medals 

Exchisive De-iigns In 

Wedding' Engraving- Menus 

Calling- Cards Leather Souvenirs 

Commencement Invitations Stationery 

Dance Programs Photogravures 



Morton 
Chronicle Press 

GEORGE E. WHITAKER 
Proprietor 

Comme?'ciaI Printing 

Bell 'Phone 1019-J 
MORTON, PA. 



( i 



TARTAN" 




BRAND 

GOODS 

will please 
you 

Ask Your Grocer for "TARTAN" 

BRAND Coffee, Tea, 

Canned Goods 

Alfred Lowry & 
Bro. 

PHILADELPHIA 



E. C. WALTON 

Real Estate 

and 

Insurance 

SWARTHMORE, PENNA. 

Flounder's Candy Shop 

Opposite Pastime Theatre 

Confections, 

Ice Cream and 

Sodas 



State Street 



MEDIA 



271 



ANTHONY P. GRECO 

Barbershops 



PHILADELPHIA 



Adelphia Hotel 
Bingham Hotel 



Vendig Hotel 
Ritz-Carlton 



Joseph C. Ferguson, Jr. 

Optical Goods, 

Kodaks and Kodak 

Supplies 

Opposite 15th Street Exit 
Broad Street Station 

6-8 and 10 South 15th Street 
PHILADELPHIA 





Electrical 
Supplies 

Frank H. Stewart 
Electric Co. 

Old Mint Building 
37-39 N. 7th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Ricci & Malatesta 

Tailors 

For the College Man 
who cares to dress well 
A style for every taste 

39 S. 18th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Save Money and Go to the 
Right TAILOR 



Bell Phone S-504 



Harris & Company 

You will get A'our work at the time promised 
if it is done by us'^ 
Corner of Chester Road and Park Avenue 



272 



H. PARKER ROLFE 

Photographer 

Studio— 1714 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




Special Rates 

On School and College 

Photos 

Portraits 
Home Portraiture 



Reproductions, Enlargements and General Photography 



273 



If You Want an Expert 
Tailor 

for 

French Dry Cleaning 
Remodeling Scouring 

Pressing- 
Just come to the 

SWARTHMORE 
TAILOR 

9 South Chester Road 

Save Your Old Clothes 

Special Rates for Students 



dOHNHDOYLE 

NEMORIAL TABLETS 

14S.THiRD ST.. PHILADELPHIA 



CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 



|1^ 



Lighting Fixtures 
Lanterns 

Blddle-Gaumer 
Company 

3846-56 Lancaster Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Art Metal Workers 




ROBERT SHOEMAKER & CO. 

Wholesale Drug-g-ists 

Manufacturers of 

PAINTS and VARNISHES 



N. E. Cor. Fourth and Race Streets 



PHILADELPHIA 



274 



fratts, 

The Original 

Animal and Poultry Regula- 
tors and Remedies and 
Baby Chick Food 
of America 

Used nearly fifty yeai's by successful 
stock and poultry raisers. 

Better results and increased profits se- 
cured by their use. 

Sold on "Satisfaction or Money Back" 
guarantee by dealers everywhere. 

PRATT FOOD CO. 

PHILADELPHIA 
CHICAGO TORONTO 

J. H. VOELKER 

Shaving and 
Hair cutting 

Affida\-its, Acknowledgements, 
Automobile Licenses, Etc. 




Ladies' and Misses' 
Hyland Shirts 

Made to Order 

Ready-made in plain styles. 
Collars attached, collars de- 
tached. 

Mann & Dilks 

1102 CHESTNUT STREET 

The Rittenhouse Hotel 

Chestnut and Twenty-second Sts. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A Hotel of Refinement and Elegance. 
Exceptionally equipped for Banquets. 
Dances and Social Functions. 

Over 350 rooms. Special College Rates. 
Single Rooms, .fl.50 to $5.00 per day. 
Double Rooms, |3.50 to .$7.00 per day. 

CHARLES DUFFY, Manager 



Your Fire Protection Problems now and hereafter can 

be solved by . 

FOAMITE FIREFOAM COMPANY 

JF^ire Protection Everywhere 
Specializing in Extra Hazardous Risks 



200 Fifth Avenue 



NKVV YORK 



275 



Friends Books Headquarters for 
School Supplies Friends Marriage 


A. R. JUSTICE 


Printing- Certificates 
Engraving 


COMPANY 




Wholesale 


Walter H. Jenkins 


Silverware, Cut Glass, 


Stationer 


Prize Cups, Etc. 




Manufacturers of 


140 North loth Street 


U-Kan Plate Silver Polish 


PllIl.ADELI'HIA, Pa. 


612 Chestnut St. Philadelphia 


Ice Cream Pastry 


FRANK BRANNAN 


POWNALL BUILDING 


Opposite Town Hall 


Candy Cakes 




ii7G 



Superior Clothes 



Moderate Prices 



EDWARD R. WILLIAMS 

Exclusive Tailor for Better 
Dressed Men 



1306 Walnut Street 



PHILADELPHIA 



BORDEN'S 



Almond Bars 

Delicious 



Milk Chocolate 

Nourishing 



For sale at all good drug stores 



Engraving Printing Binding 

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF 




iliiililuiKS Owned ami Kxclusively Occuiiied hy GKIT 

College and School Half-tone and Line Engraving 

Especially Solicited. Write LTs Before 

Placing Your Next Order 



GRIT PUBLISHING CO. 



Williamsport, Pa. 



277 




How Do You Wear Your Hat? 

Did you ever have somebod,y put your hat on for you 
and t\'\ to wear it that way ? 

It can't be done. You experience acute discomfort un- 
til you give it a little familiar tug, and it settles down com- 
fortably. Now it is your hat. 

And how about the clothes you wear ? Do you ever 
feel that you are wearing somebody else's clothes ? 



Are they made in accordance with your fancy, your 
whims, your habits ? In brief, do they fit your personality ? 

You long ago discarded ready-made clothes, if indeed 
you ever wore them: but why not adopt individual is.\\onng,i 
Then when you get clothes, they will be emphatically your 
clothes. 

We build clothes around a man's personality. Watch 
us do it. 

We have all the seasonable things in variety, the 
choicest weaves — all-wool, and the best only. And the 
fjannents are made by well-paid, contented wcirkers. 

Kendig- Whelan- Mason 

13th & Walnut Streets 

131 South Twelfth Street 

Phone 
Walnut 3+,S 



278 



Does it pay to Di'ess Well ? 

Robt. O. P. Stuart 

Tailor 

1434 COLUMBIA AVENUE 
^ Corner 15th Street 
Philadelphia 



OFFICIAL for more than forty years. 
Spalding Athletic Goods have been the 
standard by which Quality is judged. 

A, G. 

SPALDING 

& BROS. 

136 Nassau St. 

Nkw Youk 

City 



fiend fur 



CataliH/ 




No Agencies 



Sailor Suits a Specialty Made to Order Only 

TAILOR to Men, Women and Children 



PETER THOMSON 

Naval and Merchant 

Tailor 



634 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 



Walnut at 12th Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



Ott Engraving Co. 

Engravers and 
Designers 

Invitations Dance Programs 

Menus, Etc. 

1021 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



You get more for the dollar ($1 ) 
which you spend to JOIN the 

Y. M. C. A. 

than for am* other dollar 
you will ever spend. 

Full SIO.OO privilege in any Y. M. 
('. A. by simply showing your col- 
lege membership card. 




Trees 




Plant Historic Ones 

pLANT a living memorial of the 
-'- restoration of Peace; of the 
glorious sacrifice of noble lives; of 
the part played by your dear ones. 
Our English Elms, scions cut from 
aged trees, which we especially 
obtained from historic places in 
England and Scotland; will always 
carry the sentimental association 
of interest in our Allies. 
This special lot of trees is not to 
be found at any other source in 
the world. Ours is the only sup- 
ply, and is limited. 
Send for information and price. 



-If., 



Nurifrympn (j^. Horticulturists 



GERMANTOWN 



PENNA. 



279 



ENGRAVINGS 

In the HALCYON 

MADE BY 

Hammersmith -Kortmeyer 
Compan)^ 

MILW^AUKEE, WIS. 



Get our special proposition on your Annual 



280 



The Great Clearing House for 
Swarthmore News 



News of Your Old Class Mates 

Up-to-the- Minute Alumni News. 

A weekly feature story about some big Swarth- 



morean. 



News of Swarthmore Men in the Service 

An up-to-date War Directory. 

Special War Stories written by the Boys them- 
selves. 

News of the Undergraduates 

Times are changing! Big things are on foot! 

All these are having their effect on Swarthmore. 
She will emerge from the present agitation big- 
ger and better. Watch her ! 

A Motion Picture of Swarthmore in News 
Every week. 

^^' Q\}otnix 

JAMES F. BOGARDUS, '21 
Business Manager 

Subscription for One Year $1,50 



281 



UiiSirtf^tiiMiv^